Digitally included:  Paving the way for the digital inclusion  of disabled people Simon Hogg  Digital Communications  A Bo...
About the Office for Disability Issues <ul><li>Leadership.  We lead the government's vision of achieving equality for disa...
A Bold Vision for 2014
A Key Digital Statistic 74% of non-disabled people within the UK use the internet 48% of disabled people within the UK use...
What are the Office for Disability Issue’s priorities for digital inclusion? <ul><ul><li>Enable disabled people to get onl...
Enabling disabled people to get online <ul><li>Working with Race Online 2012: how do we ensure disabled people are represe...
Ensuring government online services are inclusive <ul><ul><li>Accessibility: it’s not an afterthought!  </li></ul></ul><ul...
Capability building <ul><li>Digital products </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible Media Pla...
A Bold Vision for 2014
A Bold Vision for 2014
Capability building <ul><li>Digital products </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible Media Pla...
Where next? <ul><li>We did a lot of groundwork last year, but now we need your help! </li></ul><ul><li>Visit our website: ...
Links and resources www.odi.gov.uk/communications www.odi.gov.uk/policy www.odi.gov.uk/facts www.odi.gov.uk/roadmap-to-dis...
Keep in touch <ul><li>www.odi.gov.uk/newsletter </li></ul><ul><li>twitter.com/odigovuk </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] <...
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Digitally included: Paving the way for the digital inclusion of disabled people

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How the Office for Disability Issues is ensuring the needs of disabled people are addressed in the government's digital inclusion policy. Presentation by the Office for Disability Issues made to the eAccessibility Forum on 11 January 2011.

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  • One of the things that ODI is keen to address is the removal of barriers within society. If you aren’t familiar with the social model of disability, the easiest way to understand this is with the example of using a bus. Someone might be disabled because they are unable to board a bus with their wheelchair. Making the bus accessible by, for instance, offering level access, means that they can board it and, in this instance at least, they are no longer disabled. As I’m sure you are aware, the digital agenda has increased in significance over the course of 2010. ODI is concerned that everyone, including disabled people, are able to take advantage of the growing digital economy, and don’t face unnecessary barriers. Additionally, a study conducted by ODI in 2008 found that participants considered digital inclusion key to their feelings of social inclusion and participation. By ignoring (or not considering fully) the needs of disabled people service providers, whether within government or outside, risk actually increasing exclusion. It’s relevant to businesses too: the Employers Forum on Disability produced a study that showed 83% of disabled people will avoid spending money with companies are inaccessible, far more than will actually complain to them.
  • This may be a familiar statistic to some of you, but it is worth considering. The interesting thing is that, when ODI explored this statistic in our Experiences and Expectations of Disabled People report, the reasons disabled people gave for not being online were broadly similar to those of non-disabled people, the biggest being that they didn’t see anything in it for them. If we encourage people to get online without making it accessible, we’ll simply be confirming their existing beliefs and make it harder to get them online in the future.
  • As you know, Race Online is working closely with organisations across government, private and voluntary sectors to set the pace for this area of digital inclusion. We fully support the aims of RO2012, and we got involved to ensure that the particular issues faced by disabled people are appropriately recognised as distinct from other excluded parts of society. We’ve had really positive discussions with them which have directly led to sharing information and expertise about disability. We’ve also provided lines for Martha Lane Fox about disability and are involved with the national digital inclusion conference later this year. We are working with them to get tools and info onto their website and out to their stakeholders.
  • At ODI we e ncourage all civil servants to buy into the principles of accessibility, meaning that more projects will be inclusive from the beginning. It’s not a box-ticking exercise: it has real effects on real people. For example a poorly chosen colour scheme can prevent a site being used by someone who is colourblind, who then has to ring or visit an advisor, costing much more in time and money. We understand the financial pressures faced across the public sector at the moment. However, accessibility doesn’t have to be expensive if you plan it in at the start: in fact, it will cost you much more if you try to do it after the event, when you may have no choice! We’re in touch with BIS, with DWP, Directgov (board and franchise directors) and Cabinet Office to help them take measures to include disabled people in the design of online services We are also participating in governmental working groups like the eAccessibility forum, and the DWP digital inclusion network. Finally, we offering a connection between disabled people’s organisations and government departments. This helps people understand the real needs of what they must provide to meet the needs of disabled people at the earliest stages of online service development. EQ2025 is an NDPB that offers strategic, confidential advice to government on issues that affect disabled people . We are also piloting a Network of Networks, an innovative way of getting disabled people heard within government by drawing on the existing networks of disabled people’s organisations.
  • We have a range of capability building tools, most of which are available for download on our website at www.odi.gov.uk. Our digital products are something we have been developing over the last few months. Our website and accessible media player have both recently passed key milestones.
  • Our website was rewritten and restructured from scratch over the course of the summer. We wanted a website that gave quick and easy access to the tools and information we supply. We’ve also worked hard at optimising it for search, so you should find the information much more readily with Google. And of course we made sure that it was accessible to the widest range of visitors.
  • We’ve also developed an accessible media player, which we want to make available to as many organisations as possible. It presents video and mp3s online to the highest accessibility standards, and is the first player to have been awarded RNIB’s Surf Right badge.
  • We also have a number of leaflets and booklets available for download on our website. These include everything from an overview of producing accessible communications to guidance on commissioning accessible video. You can find an extensive range of statistics and definitions to help you understand how we measure disability equality. You can keep up to date with developments in ODI’s projects by subscribing to our monthly newsletter, ODInsight. Finally, we offer bespoke, practical accessibility advice to government departments, and run a very popular series of workshops for government communicators which introduce ideas about disability and what they mean practically.
  • Digitally included: Paving the way for the digital inclusion of disabled people

    1. 1. Digitally included: Paving the way for the digital inclusion of disabled people Simon Hogg Digital Communications A Bold Vision for 2014
    2. 2. About the Office for Disability Issues <ul><li>Leadership. We lead the government's vision of achieving equality for disabled people. </li></ul><ul><li>Building skills. We share our knowledge and experiences, and provide tailored advice. </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation. We test new policy ideas and new ways of delivering services. </li></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    3. 3. A Bold Vision for 2014
    4. 4. A Key Digital Statistic 74% of non-disabled people within the UK use the internet 48% of disabled people within the UK use the internet (OFCOM Digital Participation: 2010 Metrics Bulletin) A Bold Vision for 2014
    5. 5. What are the Office for Disability Issue’s priorities for digital inclusion? <ul><ul><li>Enable disabled people to get online </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure online services are inclusive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build understanding and capability across government </li></ul></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    6. 6. Enabling disabled people to get online <ul><li>Working with Race Online 2012: how do we ensure disabled people are represented? </li></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    7. 7. Ensuring government online services are inclusive <ul><ul><li>Accessibility: it’s not an afterthought! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Working with key government stakeholders to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>promote the interests and needs of disabled people in government working groups </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>encourage effective involvement of disabled people and co-production </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>facilitate conversation between disabled people, their organisations and government </li></ul></ul></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    8. 8. Capability building <ul><li>Digital products </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible Media Player </li></ul></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    9. 9. A Bold Vision for 2014
    10. 10. A Bold Vision for 2014
    11. 11. Capability building <ul><li>Digital products </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible Media Player </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guidance documents </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Background on disability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statistics and indicators </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Definitions of disability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ODInsight: monthly e-newsletter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Accessibility advice </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusive communications workshops </li></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    12. 12. Where next? <ul><li>We did a lot of groundwork last year, but now we need your help! </li></ul><ul><li>Visit our website: www.odi.gov.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Are you a disabled people’s organisation? We want to find out what you are doing. </li></ul><ul><li>If you want to collaborate on a digital project, get in touch. </li></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014
    13. 13. Links and resources www.odi.gov.uk/communications www.odi.gov.uk/policy www.odi.gov.uk/facts www.odi.gov.uk/roadmap-to-disability-equality www.odi.gov.uk/player www.odigallery.co.uk A Bold Vision for 2014
    14. 14. Keep in touch <ul><li>www.odi.gov.uk/newsletter </li></ul><ul><li>twitter.com/odigovuk </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Simon Hogg </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Communications </li></ul>A Bold Vision for 2014

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