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Keeping innovation moving asml

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Presentatie
Lucas van Grinsven
Head of Communications
ASML
BRAMM Congres Mobiliteit beweegt iedereen

Keeping innovation moving asml

  1. 1. PublicSlide 1 | Keeping innovation moving Lucas van Grinsven Hoofd Communicatie “Mobiliteit beweegt iedereen”, 17 november 2010
  2. 2. PublicSlide 2 | Agenda • Introducing ASML – a cornerstone of the chip industry • Sustainability is a key driver of the chip industry • Keeping innovation moving in the Netherlands
  3. 3. PublicSlide 3 | Introducing ASML, a cornerstone of the chip industry
  4. 4. PublicSlide 4 | Our strategy •“ •To be a technology leader in lithographic systems and software for semiconductor manufacturing, •thus enabling our customers to increase the functionality of microchips while reducing the cost and power consumption per function on a chip
  5. 5. PublicSlide 5 | $300.3 B Semiconductor Chips in 2010 $228.4 B in 2009 $1,360 B Electronic Applications in 2010 $1,204 B in 2009 $6.1 B Semiconductor Litho market in 2010 $2.5 B in 2009 Source: Gartner Q3/10 and ASML From silicon to smart electronics
  6. 6. PublicSlide 6 | 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 01 03 05 07 09 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 % Continuous lithography innovation grows market share 1984 Total market: > € 6 billion GCA Ultratech Eaton Nikon ASET Hitachi Perkin ElmerCanon ASML Nikon Canon 2010* Total market: > € 463 million ASML Technology leadership brings increased market share *estimates of independent market research firms
  7. 7. PublicSlide 7 | ASML Headquarters in Veldhoven
  8. 8. PublicSlide 8 | Sustainability is a key driver of the chip industry
  9. 9. PublicSlide 9 | ASML enables Moore’s law by providing lithography equipment to produce smaller and more powerful chips The Semiconductor Manufacturing Process A variety of complementary suppliers provide the other tools, materials and packaging equipment necessary to make ICs
  10. 10. PublicSlide 10 | Moore’s law holds steady for more than 40 years • Double the computing power per chip • At equivalent power consumption • For half the price • Every 1.5 to 2 years
  11. 11. PublicSlide 11 |Slide 11 | Moore’s law: what it means for consumers Note: data iSupply, March 2009. High quality Flash 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 $2,305 for 1Gigabyte (GB) $/GByte $0.17 for 1 GB
  12. 12. PublicSlide 12 | Smaller and cheaper chips mean market growth example: NAND Flash memory Source: ASML MCC, WSTS, Gartner 1 GB USB stick 4 GB Digital cameras 8 GB MP3 player 10 - 20 GB 60 - 80 GB Hybrid HDD FLASH camcorders Solid state disk-based laptops 2 -16 GB 80 - 150 GB 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 ’95 ’96 ’97 ’98 ’99 ’00 ’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 Year FLASHICMarket(millionsofunits) FLASH units forecast Several new NAND-based applications on the horizon 3G smart- phones
  13. 13. PublicSlide 13 | Game changer of affordable advanced computing Source: Morgan Stanley, The Mobile Internet Report, Dec 2009 10 1000 100 10,000 100,000 1,000,000 0 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Devices/Users(MMinLogScale) 1 Minicomputers 10MM+ Units PC 100MM+ Units Desktop Internet 1B+ Units / Users Mobile Internet 10B+ Users??? Mainframes 1MM+ Units Computing growth drivers over time, 1960 – 2020E More than Just phones • Smartphone • Kindle • Tablet • MP3 • Cell phone / PDA • Car Electronics GPS, ABS, A/V • Mobile Video • Home entertainment • Games • Wireless home appliances Increasing integration
  14. 14. PublicSlide 14 | Source: Jonathan Koomey, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Stanford University, 2009 Moore’s law helps to reduce energy usage Computations per Kilowatt hour double every 1.5 years Dell Optiplex GXI 486/25 and 486/33 Desktops IBM PC-AT IBM PC-XT Commodore 64 DEC PDP-11/20 Cray 1 supercomputer IBM PC SDS 920 Univac I Eniac EDVAC Univac II Univac III (transistors) Regression results: N = 76 Adjusted R-squared = 0.983 Comps/kWh = exp(0.440243 x year – 849.259) Average doubling time (1946 to 2009) = 1.57 years IBM PS/2E + Sun SS1000 Gateway P3. 733 MHz Dell Dimension 2400 SiCortex SC5832 2008 + 2009 laptops 1.E+16 1.E+15 1.E+14 1.E+13 1.E+12 1.E+11 1.E+10 1.E+09 1.E+08 1.E+07 1.E+06 1.E+05 1.E+04 1.E+03 1.E+02 1.E+01 1.E+00 ComputationsperkWh 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
  15. 15. PublicSlide 15 | Sustainable Innovations, enabled by ASML LED-lighting Green datacenters Social & Mobile media Solar Cells High-performing & energy efficient Chips ASML-machines that realize shrink
  16. 16. PublicSlide 16 | Communication became ~ 1013 more energy efficient enabled by scaling of semiconductors Frederic Remington, “The Smoke signal”, 1905, Amon Carter Museum, Forth Worth, USA 5 MJ/b 20 wood sticks of 2 cm diameter and 50 cm long equals ~3 dm³ Message size 10 characters or 10 ~15 MJ/dm³ energy from burning wood we use 45 MJ/message or 5 MJ/b High Speed Downlink Packet Access, HSDPA speed 3.65 Mb/s using 5.5 W resulting in ~1μJ/b (Siemens UR5 router) 1 μJ/b
  17. 17. PublicSlide 17 | Keeping innovation moving in the Netherlands
  18. 18. PublicSlide 18 | Managing energy efficiency, a 5-level approach 1. Energy consumption per transistor 2. Energy use of our sites 3. Energy consumption per machine 4. Energy for lithography of one wafer 5. Energy to produce chips
  19. 19. PublicSlide 19 | Energy consumption: Biggest impact is energy use transistors produced with ASML machines 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 ktonnes CO2 CO2 emissions to produce one machine CO2 emissions one machine operating one year CO2 emissions all transistors produced per machine in one year
  20. 20. PublicSlide 20 | Energy consumption per transistor CO2 emissions per computational bit decreases every year • 2007: 42 (103 kg CO2/Petabyte memory) • 2008: 21 (103 kg CO2/Petabyte memory) • 2009: 16 (103 kg CO2/Petabyte memory) The trend of reducing CO2-emissions per computational bit will continue in the future
  21. 21. PublicSlide 21 | Lithography as main enabler of memory power savings Source: Samsung (07/10)
  22. 22. PublicSlide 22 | Managing energy efficiency, a 5-level approach 1. Energy consumption per transistor 2. Energy use of our sites 3. Energy consumption per machine 4. Energy for lithography of one wafer 5. Energy to produce chips
  23. 23. PublicSlide 23 | CO2 emissions sites 2015 based on production estimates (Business as usual scenario without CO2-saving measures) 0.0 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 140.0 160.0 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 CS w w ACE Temp Rich Wil VH Target: < 45 kton CO2 in 2015 Employee mobility: <5 kton CO2
  24. 24. PublicSlide 24 | ASML and Maxima Medisch Centrum
  25. 25. PublicSlide 25 | More pressure on infrastructure
  26. 26. PublicSlide 26 | Mobility survey @ ASML • Survey held in June 2010 • 2277 (of 3931) employees filled out the survey (fix and flex employees); 58% respons. • Most important results: • Only 25% commutes by bike (62% lives within a radius of 15 km) • Only 4% commutes by bus; public transport is experiences as inefficient (buss stop is at ASML doorstep) • 59% commutes by car • 86% is flexible in start and end time of the working day • 60% commutes during rush hour • 13% of employees think that car pooling is an attractive way to commute (9% is car pooler at the moment)
  27. 27. PublicSlide 27 | Issues and potential for improvement Issues: • Commuter packages are not up to date • Frequent requests by employees for full reimbursement of the costs for public transport • Rempte working is facilitated but not promoted • Car pooling is not facilitated • Cycling is not actively encouraged • A new fiscal law will be implemented (1.4% regulation); policy choices have to be made e.g. a higher amount of electric bikes Potential for improvement: • There is potential to increase the use of bike or public transport and car pool activities • Alternative ways for commuting are large; potential for change in behavior is large, interest in car pooling is large
  28. 28. PublicSlide 28 | What is required? ASML’s Vision on Mobility & Campus: ‘’ASML strives the Veldhoven campus to be a sustainable place where people can work and meet, in a productive, safe and pleasant way, supported by: • free choice in ways of commuting • a flexible work environment (in ups and downs) • stimulus for employees to choose a healthy and sustainable way of commuting
  29. 29. PublicSlide 29 | Mobility actions Short term actions: 1. Cycling plan (extension of current plan) 2. Encourage public transport (extension current plan) 3. Promote and support car pooling 4. Green lease car policy (company car park is very small anyway) Mid term actions (under investigation): 1. Comprehensive employee mobility plan 2. Remote and Flexible work places (“Nieuwe Werken’’)
  30. 30. PublicSlide 30 | Can we create Google-like campuses?
  31. 31. PublicSlide 31 | Towards a more sustainable ASML campus
  32. 32. PublicSlide 32 |

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