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WintonWoodsMS-PARCC Ohio State Testing

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WintonWoodsMS-PARCC Ohio State Testing

  1. 1. "Jada Swúth ~Nia Go'(aOV' "Te.'('(e."'e.e. MC.e.ai"' E""'""'ª"'ve. Av'jve,ti"'e. I QW rJø=r~~-,a~t~4t--,·~&&re.:, ,._,. NOPARCCing • •SCHOOL zo.s E '#Nol"ov-ePA~C.C.C)!
  2. 2. ·,·.{ 78.. , _ TASK O•NE . EXPLAINING THE PROBLEM (001!Ttl.JUED). ( 7 8 What disagreements, if any, are there in your community about this ~oblem and the way it is being handled? e- G O- 1 O For each individual, group, or organization you identify, answer the following questions. Use a separate sheet of paper for your answers, " What is their position on the problem? «> Why are they interested? «> What are the advantages of their position? • What are the disadvantages of their position? ., How are they trying to influence government to adopt their view? 11 What level of government or government agency is responsible for 9ealing with this problem? W,hy_? e 12 What is the government doing about the problem? ß~ O'f: ffl~ :Pcg:; C','l 2009 Center for Civic Education (
  3. 3. ·,·.{ 78.. , _ TASK O•NE . EXPLAINING THE PROBLEM (001!Ttl.JUED). ( 7 8 What disagreements, if any, are there in your community about this ~oblem and the way it is being handled? e- G O- 1 O For each individual, group, or organization you identify, answer the following questions. Use a separate sheet of paper for your answers, " What is their position on the problem? «> Why are they interested? «> What are the advantages of their position? • What are the disadvantages of their position? ., How are they trying to influence government to adopt their view? 11 What level of government or government agency is responsible for 9ealing with this problem? W,hy_? e 12 What is the government doing about the problem? ß~ O'f: ffl~ :Pcg:; C','l 2009 Center for Civic Education (
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  5. 5. 4/1312015 PAR CC Is unfair to special needs students I West Miiford HelJIÄtt Nevioundland NJ I Letters to the Editor .. ( . Io LE-am More · Ciiek He're · · Cnll for Spr.•clr1ls! behalf of the student to learn something new. The common difficulties students with disabilities face daily have not been taken into account with the PARCC testing. These difficulties are: speaking, reading, comprehension, processing, memory, executive Tho does the PARCC testing hurt the most? The students who are most vulnerable. e .• bg1lEhlRVJ~ltWJ~"¥t~1~iª11flf~,~~¡',JlW~--S.î~ . . These students are expected to sit and d(ï110ÎlÍiÎÎg'fu'rt ecturatlon of the testing. 'l11e "sit and stare" iolicy i~ a direct punitive action that will negatively impact the special education populatlon,I BØ ·.'i., ··~~~~_Jl'g"ff" . , the sit and stare policy will just increase the anxiety. I implore school districts not to utilize suc 1gmatizing tactic. Offer the students who have parent refusals for the PARCC an nlternative activity. Mary Laumbach-Perez is a volunteer educational advocate for students with special needs. Professionally she is a nationally certified Employment Services Provider with 10 years of experience working with the developmental disabilities and special education population. She has 15 years experience studying Hidden Disabilities: Learning and Developmental. Laumbach-Perez is also the founder of a non-profit special education coalition. Through the coalition., she has partnered with professionals to offer special education workshops to New Jersey parent groups. The opinions expressed in this article are her own and do not express the opinions of her employer or other professionals she has partnered with. ,. Tweet ShareThls Comments Wise Monkey Rules See no evil read critically before posting: Are you "on topic?" Have you added value? Hear no evil the sound and tone of your comment should be clvll and thoughtful Speak no evil do not post anything you know to be untrue or disparaging ,¡ http://v>Æstmllfordmessenger.com'apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20150213/0PINION03'150219972/PARCC-is-unfair-to-speclal-needs-students 2/3
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  8. 8. Many critics say the questions are too confusing and the format is too complex, especially for younger students. Lila said she wanted to take the PARCC exams, despite her mother's concerns, until she took a practice test at school. She was confused by a question asking about the underlying teme of a sentence in a story, she said. Another question directed her to select the best answer when she thought none of the answers were great, she recalled. An "opt our: shirt worn by Mrntclair parent Colleen Martine, at the New Jersey Board of Education meeting (!'dam Clark I NJ Aívance ~dta for NJ.com) "Notonlywas it hard, the questions were reallycomplicated and they were, like, deceiving,"said Lila,13. "Eventually,once I had deciphered what they wanted, I had to rush to he able to finish it." Lilanowagrees with her mom thatshe shouldn't take the test. In addition to findingit confusing,she says practice tests are taking awayfrom instructional time. "Wehave alwaystold her, 'We are goingto do what wcthink is hest foryou,' "Evans said. "I do not think taking the PARCCis hest for her." In Montclair, parents have urged the schoolhoard to adopt a policyallowingstudents whowant to skip the test to receive other learning opportunities during testing periods. A vote is expected at Monday's school board meeting. No state policy In California,state law has long given parents the right to opt students out of tests, said BohSchaeffer,public education director for FairTest/the National Center for Fair and Open Testing (http://www.fairtest.org1 a national advocacygroup. Butthe issue is so new that most states, likeNewJersey, have no legalor regulatory guidance on how to handle a student refusing to take a test for nonreligious reasons, he said. "In most cases, it is unplowed ground," Schaeffersaid. A memo Hespe sent to schools in October suggestingthatthey consult their disciplinary policieswas widelyinterpreted hy opt-out advocatesas advising schoolsto punish students who cometo school but refuse to take the test. Hespe later clarifiedthe state's stance in January, saying not everyrefusal to take the tests should he considered a disciplinary problem. "Certainlyif a student comes in and they arc disruptive, you should applyyour own disciplinary policy,"Hespe said. "If they are not disruptive, you should havea policyon what you do with that child." The BloomfieldBoard of Education passed a resolution in October sayingthe district won't punish students who skip the tests and willprovide alternatives, when possible. "Wethought it was necessary to have an idea in mind early in the schoolyear ofwhat wcwere goingto do," hoard President DanielAnderson said. "Weare not promoting it or condoning it, hut the reality is some parents maywant to have their child refusethe test." Becauseadministering the tests is required under law,districts must tell students that the tests are mandatory, regardless of howthey plan to handle those who refuse to take them, said Richard Bozza,executivedirector ofthe NewJersey Association of School Administrators.
  9. 9. 4/15/2015 The 12 Reasons We Oppose the PARCC Test I Sae Our Schools NJ I~e 12 Rea!tflns We Opp()sethe}'.ARCC Te~t .Just in time for Christmas, we bring you ... The 12 Reasons We Oppose the PARCC Test 1. PARCC is poorly designed & confusing Why? J.Kf4t~1eg~1&~~îtN§!'.§tz[£~:r:ª~l~'lJ~f~.~J.!~.w~~¿f~J(.@);'.~;t},1&~1Y(multiple-choice and EBSR). These item types are most appropriate for testing very low-level skills ( e.g., recall of factual detail). However, on these tests, such item formats are pressed into a kind of service for which they are, generally, >[¡¡Jlk11'ifi'· ~,· ,-,· '"f;~î,ø~Ínot appropriate. , ·,~{~ · -é, o .,, ¡tl~~~¥fd@l§i~E~~'1$<',.Ü ,. se: .. :n;~.¥!'! $01 the questions are supposed to deal with higher-order thinking, and . i :""'' 1 ·•fli'Wtfil!~t~~á'~WtTØ,nsI;.eJl'aFtl'tí}15eif:ffíTexth;:ro:tdlt· ...- y,, ., ··-~ .., ... .u.-£if.Mtf!.·~~~u.1;0,.;.¡~.¡'x~.i'l.~;;.~~~~t~.::d:..~· · rtf,,,1§.r · ,?, all because the "experts" who designed these tests didn't understand the most basic stuff about creating assessments-that objective question formats are generally not great for testing higher-order thinking, for example." i 3. PARCCis diagnostically & instructionally useless "Many kinds of assessment-diagnostic assessment, formative assessment, performative assessment, some classroom summative assessment-has instructional value. They can be used to inform instruction and/or are themselves instructive. The results of [the PARCC]tests are not broken down in any way that is of diagnostic or instructional use. http:/lwNN.sa1ÆOurschool snj .org/2014/12/23/th~ 12-reasons-~-oppos~ the-parce-test/ 1/4
  10. 10. 4/1512015 The 12 Reasons We Oppose the PAR CC Test I Sa1.e our Schools NJ ( questions of those kinds, and the time spent on reporting, data analysis, data chats, proctoring, and other test housekeeping." i S. PARCCwill further distori: curricula and teaching "The tests drive how and what people teach, and they drive much of what is created by curriculum developers ...Those distortions are grave. In U.S. curriculum development today, the tail is wagging the dog." i 6. PARCC & other high-stakes standardized tests undermine students' creativity and desire to learn The research on motivation and creativity is very clear: externally imposed punishment and reward systems, like those associated with high-stakes standardized testing, suppress our intrinsic motivation, dramatically undermining creativity and love of learning. High-stakes standardized tests also suppress motivation and creativity because the endless test preparation narrows the curriculum and creates a boring learning environment, filled with anxiety and fear. ( 1: PARCC & other high-stakes standardized tests have an enormous financial cost "qfffl~-2'0'1~Ø'k''1far~Wi~~~f1Q.~íllf&l!tôº'-ll'ä'tfé'if5får*f'å'füiz'ê~~:t_e;siii'm'~'ôîfb" With the Comm on Core State Standards tests, this cost increases substantially. ïftß:ê}_ë.AJ?¡l@~§:~B~t~r:ª~@b'~-~¡f'g~flv!'fg.@6f:tf1Yö.&r~.lfEqz!3iJ1J~[ll~.9mläf to th e Pearson [Corpo rat ion l i n th e first three years, and you have to add the cost of [the Smarter Balanced Common Core Assessment] and the other state tests (another billion and a half?), to that. ~JWB'V.'·~"9.~l~~Xlf"';,t.trä~:f~~tl@tW~f'·rn~T~lfe~1~~~"-:··-· 7 ·· • · ~ ·. · te .u rades that:·wil~· '~~~~~~~~~~~·~1~~~~~~~~11~-1-~' 1ffl1ï{1~~:rn~m~~Y2!.~.âJi:cQQ1-m.1:)~~.i?.:.lt§E1,~B.nP:tYJflbåf.~mattef$.rOn making sure that poor kids have eye exams and warm clothes and food in their bellies, on making sure that libraries are open and that schools have nurses on duty to keep kids from dying. How many dead kids is all this testing worth, given that it is, again, of no instructional value? IF THE ANSWER TO THAT IS NOT OBVIOUS TO YOU, YOU SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED ANYWHERE NEAR A SCHOOL OR AN EDUCATIONAL POLICY-MAKING DESK." i I ~- 8. PARCC is completely experimental. lt has not been validated as accurate & yet it will be used to evaluate students, schools and teachers http:/fwN>N. sa1.eOurscl1ool snj .org /2014/12/23/the--12-reasons-we-oppose- the-par cc- testi 2/4
  11. 11. 4/1512015 The 12 Reasons We Oppose the PAR CC Test I Sa1.e Our Schools NJ , , both generally and specifically (that is, with regard to specific materials and/or skills being tested). 9. PARCC & other high-stakes standardized tests are abusive to our children · , '.,::../;,;-;~:· · ' ·· ·· '·..~,-,,, .:·JfctJzed<fä.$ts:~6r,;Jnflict.Lng::ih.ªr:JiLí~I '-•' •_.,,.· .J ¿,g;. .~ 10. PARCCwill worsen the achievement and gender gaps . ",,,..·,:»·· ,''ëîit~·fí_ël~fj¡¡':êl'ñ'd ë'rf!H~~Yp'."§"1i'nt~Hú'èfäíti'ótral'iaertøt11)1çl1jfC"ê'.fäif'g~Íå'f~g•:.,,èWiV0d'êl~för'&J... ,.,. . ' ~ . -~ ·-· • /,:¡_._:· .. -.J~~·:;f.::,,_ ..,_~.;:>::.;-:.: ;;, .... ,, -·· . . . .., ..·.. ,. . .... ;,. , and these tests and the curricula and pedagogical strategies tied to them are extremely demotivating. They create new expectations and new hurdles that will widen existing gaps, not close them." · tr:0tñ¡êr'~'®b~miS*~6i1'eió'í?ei'i;~~'ämg¡.wa¥r1Je·~tfftlr.ë1{re·g'irW'ê'ti't~fl'8Wt~¥i'tí~'§t:á;-rn'ru·a~finiz·afü~m~,, ..., which will further turn off kids already turned off by school, causing more to tune out and drop out." i 11. High-stakes standardized tests fail to improve educational outcomes "We have had more than a decade, now, of standards-and-testing-based accountability under [No Child Left Behind]. We have seen only miniscule increases in outcomes, and those are well within the margin of error of the calculations. Simply from the ,,;~;~'-Ætë'; 7;.;...,.,..fä, ,·qy:¡ç1_~i~'ª-','ril - , fÏJ:~&~l~.~ili11' And that[$.~ú~l~-~t~~fäj'.fü~tft~{!fü~;§:~tnx:rL -- K.:..~:;f , , '~--,¿¿:, -,~::.;;" '-- ,· ..··~,-~·-· ,• ,.. ,, ""·"" ; ~~·. :., which is consistent with what we know about the demotivational effects of extrinsic punishment and reward systems. It's the height of stupidity to look at a clearly failed approach and to say, 'Gee, we should do a lot more of them."' i 12. PARCCand Smarter Balanced Common Core aligned tests are designed to brand the majority of our children as failures •.. '.lf,.. ~~4t1Q_.·:·"·:.'5. ·îm.Ja'i/if.....~.Æß.~Îi~.·-1'..~.·~.;r~.'~~.:z.mf_~t®:'. . ....·~-~r,.·.Jb.:'.'6··..m.:.'fu.·..P'"'..·"'''..···..- .-. · l···~:~~~~fféM.r¢::'.~-,fi1á'füi¡~1f~~ f«li:h~~BHé1'fB'ä http:/lvwvvv.sa1ÆOurschoolsnj.org /2014/12123/the-12-reasons-'Ae-oppose- the-parce- test/ 3/4
  12. 12. 4/15/2015 The 12 Reasons We Oppose the PAR CC Test I Sa1.e Our schoos NJ ( ' The PARCC test will set its cut scores next summer, but it is very likely to follow the same pattern, creating a false narrative of failure and causing great harm to our children and our public schools. Source: http://dianeravitch.net/ .. ./bob-shepherd-why-parcc-testing-i .. ./ 11 Source: httn..;.L.Lwww.edweek.orgLJ;warticles/2014/11/17 /13sbac.h34.html Iii Source: bltn..;.L/dianeravitch. net/ ... /how-pearsons-common-core-tests..:.a,d PDF Version of this post. Available for Facebook sharing nere. sharer . ( 3 Responses to The 12 Reasons We Oppose the PARCC Test Pingback: New }ersev Blogger Mel Katz Gives All The Reasons For Opt-Out To Superintendent!!! I Exceptional Delaware Pingback: .12 Reasons to Refuse PARCCI Diane Ravltch's blog Pingback: Ed News, Fridav, March 6, 2015 Edition I tlqersteach @ 2015 - Save Our Schools NJ ( http:/fw.N.N.saveourschocl snj .org/2014112/23/tlie-12-r easons-ve-oppose- the-parce-test/ 4/4
  13. 13. A reporting project of State Board of Education on Public Corrplalntsover PARCC Test J statenpæt Ohio4/1312015 OHIO ~ Eye 011 E.clucéltíon member stations State Board of Education on Public Complaints over PARCC Test MARCH11, 201514:28 PM BY MARK URYCKI Ohio public schools are in their third week of issuing standardized teste; for students in fourth throuqh sixth grades, eighth grade, and high school. The state legislature passed a law one year ago that eliminates any ramifications for the pupils in this first year of the test. But that hasn't calmed down members of the state board of education at their .1eeting tbis week. ABOUT STATEIMPACT OHIO StatehnpactOhio is a collaboration among WCPN,WKSU and WOSU. Reporters Amy Hansen and Mark Urycki travel the state to report on the state of education in Ohio, where it's heading, and how it affects you. Readtheir reports on this site and listen to them on public racliostations across Ohio. UrlYCKI District 11 member Maryl~ose oakar of Cleveland (foregrouncl)tellinI) Sen. PeggyLehner (hack)about public complarnts over PAACCtost. It's known as the PAf~CC test, which stands for Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers. Listen to the Radio Staty lDNnlwJ with few problems so far says Jim Wright of the Ohio Department of Education. "Overall with the number of tests we have given right now there are over 850 thousand tests that have been completed, 600 thousand in math and ELA [English Language Arts] and over 250 thousand in science and social studies. So I think it shows that a lot of schools and districts are doing successfully." But Board of Education members aren't so sure. Mary Rose Oakar of Cleveland turned to State Senator Peggy Lehner and said there must be some issues with the test rollout. "Otherwise I wouldn't be getting boxes of test mania, letters from thoughtful parents, students, teachers," Oakar said. "I mean, boxes." "Yeah I know," Lehner said. "I have the same boxes. But I want to point out we've been etling those for a couple months now." Lehner, chairman of the Senate Education Committee, believes it's a vocal few who are complaining and did so even before the exams were given. Some opposition to the PARCC test comes from groups opposed to the Common Core standards that Ohio Learn More» Support State Impact Ohio» r.x. DATA:2013-14 Ohio School District Report Cards '.í DATA:2013-14 Ohio School Building Report Cards ACCES! Internet access to the requested website hast District's Intern User/Machine: IPGROUP IP: 10.80.168.69 Category: i=>cception Blocked URL: http://www.facebook.com'plugins. onvpages/Staten-,iact-Ollio/21226 show _faces=true&border_color"<' For further op rrustw ave Web !'ilter provided by Trustw ave. Copyrk EMAIL UPDATES Keep up to date with Statelmpact Ohio by subscribing to our email updates: http://statei mpact.npr.org /ohi ol2015103/11Jstate- board-of-education-on- publ ie-complalnts-over-parcc-test/ 115
  14. 14. 4/1312015 State Board of Education on Public COOl)lalnts rn.er PARCC Test I StatelrTl)B.ct Ohio educators adopted. Others just believe students take too many high stakes, standardized FUNDERS tests. Lehner asked that the board members allow the tests to run their course over the next two weeks so officials can study how well they worked. But new board member Bob Hagan of Education reporting is supported by the Youngstown said every time he goes to the grocery store he's accosted by upset parents, Corporation for Public Broadcasting and its American Graduate Initiative. ( students, and teachers. "What you're dealing 1Nitl1 now is a test that they think can end their career and the morale of teachers that is disintegrating right before our eyes." But last year and again earlier this month, Senator Lehner pointed out, the state legislature passed a law so this first-year test Nill not have ramifications on students' grades or their ability to graduate. Support for Statelmpact Ohio and its education programming on 90.3 and online is provided by the Nord Family Foundation and The Nordsan Corporation Foundation. "There are no implications for anyone at the school level, the teacher level or the students' level from these exams this spring. There are none. So not taking the test only delays our ability to find out whether it's a bad or a good test or whether its formulated well or not." That's not entirely true. ln fact, the test Nill count toward teacher evaluations unless the teacher works out a deal with the school district. lt was conservative Repuolicans, like the late State Senator Gene Watts, who wanted strict statewide standards and testing, going back to the 1990's. 'And sorne still back them. One of the eight board members appointed by Governor Kasich, Melanie Bolender, of Mt Vernon, expressed support for the exams. "Accountability is important and testing is the way to hold people accountable. I think we need to hold people accountable." ( The Senate has formed a committee that includes board members, teachers, and curriculum experts to investigate whether the PARCC test works for Ohio. They'll issue a report in May. After that the committee Nill look for ways to follow up on the State School Superintendent's goal of cutting back by 20% all standardized tests in Ohio. TOPICS The ABC's of the Common Core in Ohio Influences PARCC COMMENTS 11 Comments Statelmpact Ohio 8 Loqln « • Recommend ['.t Share Sort by Best.,, ( fJl j Join the ~1scussion... . . ..... .. ... .· ~ ~~ .. - ···~· ~--.-·~·~··· http://statelmpactnpr.org/ohla.'2015'03/11/state-board-of-educatlon-on-public-cOOl)laints·owr-parcc-test/ 215
  15. 15. 4/13/2015 PAR CC Is unfair to special needs students I West Milford Hewtt NewfoundlandNJ I Lettersto theEditor Cartoons Columns Letters to the Editor PARCC is unfair to special needs students PARCCis unfair to special neecls students PUBLISHED FEB 13, 2015 AT 6:01 AM (UPDATED FEB 13, 2015) Share This There are many parent concerns, echoed throughout the state of New .Iersey, regarding the upcoming PARCC assessment. The PARCC test aligns with the New .lersey Common Core curriculum. ;~ . However, they will he able to utilize the accommodations built into the computerized version of the test. This sounds, on paper, as appropriate accommodations for the special needs students. However, in actuality, the PARCC testing and Common Core arc creating a population of students, 1(,to 2.0 percent in New Jersey, with a very ~&~~~¥iiî~~î~W~"'V 'J1Je Common Core curriculum and the PARCC testing fit the one-size-fits- < ocsn't take into account the unique needs of our special education students with an !EP or 504. Hg·-, Some of the difficulties this population faces are reading comprehension, written expression, and fluency. The accommodations on the PARCC test cannot meet the unique needs of the student. The PARCC doesn't take into account that many language-based learning-dísa hied students read below grade level. This is very apparent on previous years' standardized test reports. There is a disparity between the partially proficient general education students and the special education list of most siguificant common core key terms hy Bruce Taylor being given out hy schools that are participating in PARCC. This document claims, if students elo not understand the meaning of these terms on which PARCC prompts are based, students learn differently than the general population. The standard visual test wou Id create an unfair disadvantage to these specific leamers even with a reader or audio-component. -~mt&.1i~'.~i.i~.~~Æ~~1ªRAt~~~ØJ.w~- . _ .These students are often below gracie level as well. Many parents arc concerned in this group of learners. · · 1 1 1 . ,a· , f'a,Ji:W¡~~Øft[~clt-·11iis can adversely affect a child';s:~lf esteem. Standardized testing for one with a neurological condition is penalizing those students. •• Most: Rend Commented Emniled 04/09/201? The return of Arnold Road 04/09/2015 District's Wechling retiring 04/08/2015 Lakeland Bank honors colleagues for years of service 04/09/2015 Take Five with Murad Yassin 04/09/2015 School district approves tech upgrade 04/07/2015 Hensley calls for GOP debate 04/07/2015 Anthony Christopher Neglia 04/08/2015 BASF to sponsor two free lectures by Oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle Tm: WEEK'S MOSTDISCI:SSEI>STOR!l·~~ Dining Guide 2014 http://Westmlfordmessenger.coovapps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20150213/0PINION03/150219972/PARCC-ls-unfalr-to-speclal-needs-students 1/3
  16. 16. 4/1312015 PAR CC Is unfair to special needs students I West Miiford HelJIÄtt Nevioundland NJ I Letters to the Editor .. ( . Io LE-am More · Ciiek He're · · Cnll for Spr.•clr1ls! behalf of the student to learn something new. The common difficulties students with disabilities face daily have not been taken into account with the PARCC testing. These difficulties are: speaking, reading, comprehension, processing, memory, executive Tho does the PARCC testing hurt the most? The students who are most vulnerable. e .• bg1lEhlRVJ~ltWJ~"¥t~1~iª11flf~,~~¡',JlW~--S.î~ . . These students are expected to sit and d(ï110ÎlÍiÎÎg'fu'rt ecturatlon of the testing. 'l11e "sit and stare" iolicy i~ a direct punitive action that will negatively impact the special education populatlon,I BØ ·.'i., ··~~~~_Jl'g"ff" . , the sit and stare policy will just increase the anxiety. I implore school districts not to utilize suc 1gmatizing tactic. Offer the students who have parent refusals for the PARCC an nlternative activity. Mary Laumbach-Perez is a volunteer educational advocate for students with special needs. Professionally she is a nationally certified Employment Services Provider with 10 years of experience working with the developmental disabilities and special education population. She has 15 years experience studying Hidden Disabilities: Learning and Developmental. Laumbach-Perez is also the founder of a non-profit special education coalition. Through the coalition., she has partnered with professionals to offer special education workshops to New Jersey parent groups. The opinions expressed in this article are her own and do not express the opinions of her employer or other professionals she has partnered with. ,. Tweet ShareThls Comments Wise Monkey Rules See no evil read critically before posting: Are you "on topic?" Have you added value? Hear no evil the sound and tone of your comment should be clvll and thoughtful Speak no evil do not post anything you know to be untrue or disparaging ,¡ http://v>Æstmllfordmessenger.com'apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20150213/0PINION03'150219972/PARCC-is-unfair-to-speclal-needs-students 2/3
  17. 17. Parent? Student? leacher? NO Wh~t~~~~%,~z~~·;~:r~~e~~1 :~1Y1~l~t~~;~iew ~ in our school: PARCC. SŒCll lt Hl Overtesting strips us of ow love of lc<H ning. Hig1 stakes tc-stir.g .lmits ocr exptomttcn of ourwodd, our teacher's t:rnativity, and our school's 1thilit.yto Improve education Yoy.are.more .Hu1n.ø.:;core. Wonl.m.9r.dnf2Ui91l>Julp;//ßl1~q-~_b•i:tfll~.~-"'·m.~ For the alternative policies some that we have mentioned are giving individuals the option to opt out of taking the test instead of making everyone take the test. Yes this is already an option but we've decided to mention it because many parents do not know about it here. This is a good alternative to the people but not to the school because the people will be happy with choosing which test but the schools will be having to pay for two tests. The second alternative is to go back to regular standardized testing (OAA). This will be hard to decide because some people like the new test. Although many at this particular school dislike the PARCC tests some school districts do enjoy the new computer based testing. So this will get a lot of controversy among Ohio. The state governor could choose to not allow PAR CC tests at all so we have to be careful of what we ask so we keep everyone i n mind when we make the final decision. The third alternative is to allow schools to decide which test to take and not the state of Ohio. This would be good because some VOU CAN ... • Refuse the PARCC • Take Control of Your Education • Make a Stand schools may like it and some may not. Many states are doing PARCC by state not by school district so it would be a good solution to one of the problems. Also many students have chosen to opt out of the test so instead of having vast numbers of students opt out the entire school can just opt out. This will help because once a child opts out you'll have to get a new test for them to take so if vast amount of people opt out it would be smart for the entire school to opt out as well.
  18. 18. PARCC Testing: Some Ohio · parents opting out Department of Education issues warning BY: Julie O'Neill (mailto:joneill@wcpo.com) LOVELAND,Ohio - Are you in or out? 9 On Your Side has found that a growing number ofparents are considering opting their kids out of next week's new standardized testing for Ohio in spite ofwarnings from the Department of Education about possible consequences. Many parents are taking their concerns to social media. And even a local superintendent is expressing reservations about it. Loveland parents like AmyBroermann are sounding offon the private "Learn Loveland" Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1023711754310780/). Ohio is among 13 states in the consortium called the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for Collegeand Careers (PARCC),(http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Testing-old/Ohio-s- State-Tests/Partnership-for-Assessment-of-Readiness-for..,Co-1)which developed Ohio's new grades 3-12 English language arts and mathematics state tests. Broermann has spent the last fewdays conferring with other parents concerned about PARCC testing, and she says the math doesn't add up. "The number of days that teachers spent preparing for it. The number of days that school will be disrupted so that kids can take the tests ... It's gone too far," she said. "I hear about teachers complaining that they spend as much time and energy on paperwork and prepping for tests as they do actually teaching the kids. "The money and time that is being spent with all the standardized testing is not most benefiting our kids and Ijust worry that we are traveling in the totally wrong direction as to how we can best help our kids and help our teachers educate our kids."
  19. 19. Loveland Superintendent Chad Hilliker understands her concern and has shared his on his blog. (http://www.lovelandschools.org/protected/ ArticleView.aspx?iid=5IU2B2&dasi=3IU2) "My concern isn't about the testing. It's about the number of days that we're going to be ( -, testing," he told 9 On Your Side. "We used to test two days a year for reading and for math. Now we're testing in eight sessions, which changes the schedule for eight days." The grassroots organization Opt Out Ohio (http://ohioansagainstcommoncore.com/ optoutohiochallenge-your-childs-safe-harbor /) said the opt-out form on its site has been downloaded 24,000 times since they posted it two weeks ago. Hilliker says only a minority are opting out in Loveland. "We have some people who have opted out but not a vast majority of people are doing that. Most people want their children to take the test because we need to see the results. We kind of need to see what it's like after the first year before we really make a determination about what that really means for our students," he said. ( The Ohio Department of Education has a warning on its website (https://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Testing-old/News/Guidance-on-Testing-Refusal-Cases- Offered) about possible consequences for students, teachers, schools and districts when students don't take state tests. Broermann believes this first year is the best year to opt out to minimize negative consequences such as affecting her district's report card or funding. She is opting out. "Onlybecause I think that sends the strongest message," she said. Parents have been sounding offon this issue on WCPO'sFacebookpage. (https://www.facebook.com/WCP09/posts/10152832985863445) We'd like to hear from you with this testing beginning Feb. 16.
  20. 20. Elementary school teachers: How PARCC testing is affecting our classrooms - The Washi... Page 1 of 5 ~he ttlttøbittgtontJoøt Answer Sheet Elementary school teachers: How PARCCtesting is affecting our classrooms By Valerie Strauss March 23 With the spring standardized testing season under way, we are hearing from a growing number of teachers, principals and even superintendents who are speaking out about the negative effects of high- stakes testing on teaching and learning. For example, Steve Kramer, superintendent of Madeira City Schools in Ohio, recently wrote an open letter about why he is "profoundly concerned" about new Common Core testing. The following post is an open letter signed by 20 teachers at Barbieri Elementary School in Framingham, Massachusetts, who detail how Common Core testing is affecting their classrooms. Here's the open letter: We are teachers at Barbieri Elementary School who want to make clear what is happening in your children's classrooms as a result of decisions made in offices far away. This year, 3rd-8th graders in Framingham Public Schools will be taking the test known as PARCC,which will be replacing the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS). PARCCwas created by the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, one of two multi-state consortia given $360 million in federal funds to design new standardized tests to hold students, schools and teachers "accountable." As teachers we cannot stay silent as PARCCmakes its way into our classrooms. In the words of Soujourner Truth at the 1851 Women's Convention, "Where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter." Nationally, we're hearing a racket about the problem of standardized tests driving instruction, knocking the process of education clearly out of kilter. Here are a few reasons why: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2015/03/23/elementary-school-teac... 4/8/2015
  21. 21. Elementary school teachers: How PARCC testing is affecting our classrooms -The Washi... Page 2 of 5 1. Test Prep takes time awayft•om REAL Reading, W1·iting and Math Instruction. ( For example, leading up to the PARCCexam, regular instruction is suspended in reading and writing classes in order to prepare our students for the kind of passages and questions they will encounter. On average we will cancel six weeks of reading and writing instruction to prepare for the tests. The time for independent reading, read-alouds and word study is replaced with repeated practice answering multiple choice questions and writing multi-paragraph essays in less time than they will ever be asked to do in high school or college. This does not even account for the instruction time lost to actually taking the PARCCtests. This year students will lose seven additional learning days in Grade Three, eight days in Grade Four and nine days in Grade Five, while the children take the PARCCexam (in addition to science MCASin fifth grade). Some say that because students will only be allowed 75 minutes to complete the test, there will still be plenty of time for regular instruction. However, it will take at least an additional 40 minutes to get students appropriately seated, hand out the materials and read the lengthy directions. This also does not account for the fact that some students are allowed up to the entire school day to complete the tests, and we cannot introduce new concepts with part of the class still testing. Furthermore, PARCCis only one of many state and district mandated tests that your children have to take each year. 2. Test Prep Negatively Affects Children's Love ofLearninq We became elementary school teachers because we wanted to help foster a love of learning. We teach our students that reading can bring joy and that math is magical. But that message is nullified when we start to prepare our students for standardized tests. We tell our students that they can no longer talk with their friends to puzzle out a math solution, or consult the word wall to help them understand unfamiliar words. We tell our students that they need to read quickly because on testing days they will have a mere 75 minutes to read two or three stories, answer multiple choice questions and write an essay. As we completely undermine what we have spent so much time building, our students begin to lose their passion for reading and math. If wc extinguish the passion to learn at such a young age, how are we preparing them for "college and careers?" 3. Standardized Tests Punish English Language Learners, Students with Special Needs and Students with Anxiety http:!/www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2015/03/23/elementary-school-teac... 4/8/2015
  22. 22. Elementary school teachers: How PARCC testing is affecting our classrooms - The Washi ... Page 3 of 5 As teachers, wc constantly strive to meet the individual needs of our students by differentiating instruction so that everyone can access the curriculum. But that is not the message during testing time. For the first time in the school year, all students arc expected to read independently at their given grade level. Students with special needs and those whose first language is not English arc likely to struggle. Every year, children who are anxious about school freeze up, become ill, and/or are reduced to tears by these types of tests. Russ Walsh, a literacy expe1t, recentlydetermined that the majority of passages and questions on the sample PARCCtests arc two years beyond the expected reading level for the grade. He summarized his findings by saying that the tests will provide very limited information for parents and teachers, and a tremendous amount of frustration for students. 4. PARCC= Failing our Teachers and Students The results of the PAR.CC tests will no doubt feed into the education reform mantra that our kids, teachers and schools are failing. Each year, there are wholesale changes to curriculum because the goal of education has become "passing the test." We have to scramble to create lesson plans for these constantly changing expectations. How can we do our best work if we are not properly trained in the curriculum? A new lesson requires time for teachers to understand the concept deeply and determine how best to present it. It requires time to think about how to engage students in the lesson, how to accommodate for individual student needs, and to gather the necessary materials. We need time to create visual supports, and to consider how to assess students' understanding of what is taught. Multiply that time by four or more subjects in a day, and you can sec how it becomes impossible for teachers to be effective when curriculum is changed every year to fit a test. Excellent teaching is aligned to the individual learning needs of students, and it is out of kilter to have to teach to the expectations of a standardized test. These sterile tests and the accompanying weeks of artificial test-prep stand in stark contrast to the rich and varied learning experiences we strive for in the classroom. By way of this testing, we see the curriculum narrowing, a false definition of educational success expanding, and the appreciation of school and life-long learning vanishing. Pat Kryzak, 3rd Grade Teacher http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2015/03/23/elementary-school-teac... 4/8/2015
  23. 23. Elementary school teachers: How PARCC testing is affecting our classrooms - The Washi... Page 4 of 5 Antonella D'Eramo, 3rd Grade Teacher / Laura Molina Camarasa, 3rd Grade Teacher Sarah Pogson, 3rd Grade Teacher Rebecca Lally, 3rdGrade Teacher Jocelynne Mackay, 3rdGrade Teacher Megan Gage, 3rdGrade Teacher Jean Mulcahey, 3rdGrade Teacher Lisie Haustein, 4th Grade Teacher Katy Shander-Reynolds, 4th Grade Teacher Monica Viteri-Harutunian, 4th Grade Teacher Ned Sawyer, 4th Grade Teacher Kirstin Veeder, 4th Grade Teacher Ann Croatti, 4th Grade Teacher Susan Quemere, 4th Grade Teacher Tamar Szmuilowicz, 5th Grade Teacher Laura Goldman, 5th Grade Teacher Susan Rosser, 5th Grade Teacher Teresa Burke, 5th Grade Teacher Cristina Sandza-Donovan, 5th Grade Teacher http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answcr-shect/wp/2015/03/23/elcmcntary-school-teac... 4/8/2015
  24. 24. • Takes up less time • Has easier questions • Get grants to pay for the assessments • Take it all one day • Gets more class time • You'll know the content of the text These are some advantages of going back to paper state testing better known as OAA 's. Some advantages of going back are it takes less time and and you can finish all tests in a week time frame. Since it takes up less time you'll have more class time and time for your teachers to teach you things you may need to know on these tests. Disadvantages on going back to the OAA 's • Its not as challenging as PARCC • We won't know how to operate the computers for other things • Its not eco friendly These are some disagreements on our alternative policy which is going back to the OAA 's. Some of the things we came up with are the PARCC is not as challenging as the OAAs, so we could be preparing for the next grade up. Also its not eco friendly and you would be using a lot of paper when we could be taking the online tests. Although there are some disadvantages these things can be fixed besides the paper issue so I still think we should go back to regular paper testing OAA 's.
  25. 25. stares reconsmer common core tests By Adrienne Lu February 20, 2014 Beginning in March,-mti.~~DJÆ~;¡<l'è<]ff tlCß.!!!i4l~:!l.M; a set of standards adopted by almost every state that map out what students should know and be able to do in each grade. .-·-m~•ifd~Jmm:~~~, ~~g¡~~to increase academic rigor for all students and to allow states to better evaluate their students and compare them with those in other states. The testing that will take place starting in March wi11 serve as a dry run for the two groups of states that have , , u .' banded together to develop Common Core tests, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and the Partnership' for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC. In most states, the real Common Core tests will · ·,,gin in 2015. ·y K12 Online Public School k 12.cdm/Ohio -Ad I . Learn About Tuition-Free Online School in OH. Power But as controversy over the Common Core has challenged some states' commitment to the standards,_., ~d~il!Im..--1,, · · raising questions about the cost of the tests and the long-term viability ofthe multi-state testing groups, which~~ ŒØIJJmJJml· . ·. The federal grants will end this fall, and it is unclear whether the testing groups will continue past that point. "What gets tested is what gets taught," said Joan Herman, co-director emeritus ofthe National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing at UCLA. "To the extent that the assessments well represent the spirit l meaning of the standards, the spirit and meaning ofthe standards will get taught. Where the assessments fall snott, curriculum, instruction and teaching willlikely fall short as well."
  26. 26. Dropping the tests ~~~Crlticsfromb~hends~fuepoliticd spectrum cited a variety of complaints, including the fear of federal control over education, questions about whethe( Common Core is superior to previous state standards and worries about .the implementation ofthe standards, · including the cost to states and school districts . .~):[ft;)T'°%:tfi ~?(ç':,:¡'.{1P:hJ:;.n'(~ ·~··mt--rhfä~·;~·(I {pikir~ í, d:qi 'g~î. K.ahITTta }fff~. tú~ ~ïiY~ Ilii o.:!, • ~l .O , º º o t º- (! fd)ij'!) • , • • , , • , - ., --. : - .- • - • ,..~·«, ·,. _- ->;:·¿·..~(F}_::)~i,·{~:-{--rt>:'_-'.~~z)~-·:,}.~.TY~~,~,:,...._~ --~····~· ~-~-- - ',.~/ -~,_~'.?-:/':(li~l?i( ,;f~~~~~s·_¡r..~L~Ji:i;fo:~,~1v¡¡t1o;(~·:~p.rJ~F:iiï~~miiif.~;·.~ifü~;_'.rnr'i;ùit;~{L:;-iéfuî~·..~~-fü ··füt~r~ ";,'tf' ~ · ·t.··fü~~) ..J.>~-.~~~j¡~i¡i~{~j)fü~~,i'~~~~' ..... ... only the English standards). But WJW!?or~'Ja'wl,!.!~.~ opting instead to commission tests from the . • and instead Pennsylvania has said it will use its own tests. - about the median its member states now pay for standardized tests; ····and than current standardized test costs in two-thirds of the member states. =A J Ad Amplify ELA amplify.com/ELA Get your students excited about complex texts with Am¡ Herman said both PARCCand Smarter Balanced are breaking new ground in developing student tests. '~~ii1f'"1d;£{1Jñ~imlmfûJIS~l)@p,!gif~@mltllB~ŒØ," Herman sait· "No doubt some folks don't think they're far enough, but in my mind, they're definitely an important step forward and will~~~tm1r~m¥ï1lf@.îfçííi'§!filri'ft.rd~~X!§.¡,JJm~t~lm}~t~~,,
  27. 27. <tbc ttlíl!lbington¡Jost 'nions Want your kids to opt out of standardized tests? The Constitution may be with you. Correction: An earlier version of this story attributed a.finding - that pre-kindergarten through ieth grade students take 113 tests - to the wrong education organization. The version below has been corrected. By Anya Kamenetz January 9 Anya Kamenetz writes about education for NPR. This essayis adapted from her book "The Test: WhyOur Schools Are Obsessed With Standardized Testing - but You Don't Haveto Be." When Jeanette Deutermann's older son began third grade, he started crying and begging not to go to school. He developed stomachaches that a doctor said were stress-related. Deutermann, a stay-at-home mom in Nassau County, Long Island, was mystified. "In kindergarten, first, second grade, he wasn't a kid who was like, 'Please let go to school,'" she recalled. "But he didn't have issues." She eventually realized what was stressing him out: ~~J.ï11(Wfi@l"l.11J.!lg,IîJif]!¡~ßœ~Ø On top of state-mandated annual exams, her school and district had imposed many more diagnostic, benchmark and practice tests. For Deutermann, the last straw came in February 2013, during her son's fourth-grade year, when he brought home a notide that he'd been "selected" for something called "Sunrise Academy." Based on their scores on the NWEA, a benchmark test, some fourth-graders - gifted as well as struggling kids - were asked to come in at 7:30 a.m. two mornings a week to prep for the state exam. "For me it was a-~ota.I red flag," peutermann recalled, "I start asking: 'What happens ifhe doesn't do well? WiU he be put on a lower track? What is the consequence?'" She was told the test would measure the school's performance, not her son's. But Deutermann had had enough. So she founded a Facebook group, Long Island Opt-out Info, that February and started organizing other parents. the next spring, , !'§}~'l)]l!zSJiritr,!Lt§i~}ñîï'[Çl§f.@.~-;;jlrâñcflîW"d~t~ .l.-
  28. 28. (,_ u ·-vv-~u~,·.v~~·.v~•·.···-~c,v>~~---,-~-.~·--~-.w~ •• ~-~~-----•--·•~----~=~~~~~--~~~-·~·~-~ --~-~·~-~ ..,-.,~,•n·v,--'-~--~~ ~~~~- determined to reclaim local control and opposed to market-based reforms, school closures and cutbacks - fiJ.mñ'gt"tliê.ir:mit:i~ltJlJ§fäffffi._HiiJg.it~&J Designed to assess students and hold teachers, schools, districts and states accountable for their performance, high-stakes exams have come to define education for many kids. The Council ofthe Great CitySchools has reported that ~"".®1í®!til~!t1ll!l!!1ifil!'eíi'à'li'iliil'!filmil1Bf]lfülI!lli!fïl~Il~áLILt.- ~"û· . íW§ffll The new national resistance holds that these exams do not provide useful or timely information; that they are unfair to minorities and other disadvantaged grnups; and that tests and prep are crowding out arts, science, social studies and zrst-century skills. Officialsare pushing back. Yet parents are finding constitutional arguments to support their approach, and in many cases they'r~~vVinni11g. There are no hard numbers. But starting in 2013, changes to teacher evaluations related to Race to the Top, a federal incentive program, as well as the adoption of the Common Core standards, triggered a new wave of opt-out protests and boycotts led by parent groups and teachers unions.Qi•ør~JJ:~1~11m}nfti~iliiiwí:Jil,W~:"" : f:~~'î§ilftll_... f¡. Organizers in Denver and Chicago also recruited many defectors during the 2014 testing . legendar Histofy..,," historian William J. Reese tells the story ofwhat happened in 1845 in Boston, when reformers, led by the . ···,·· · . , ,í : ·culnsT.ftñfis'ª"i$~,r.,,rytegtnñ'¡i)1fv..1;·c.r1:;·1fg'ffii2·;;lf&fü§.fU:ä~lf Pi'~r~êfJ~lfffà.dê'r'Yf:¡¡.,.;:;r¡:· ,.,..,,,., ~,, .,•.t!hJ,..·.(·~1¡'1):',~,!:,l-1-.:·:·.~~.../:t!:l-'- • lt 1):,¡~!t. · .,.~.·R~......,.....~,~·-- · ru~·~,-,Y.~..~- · .. . 8•.:.<~">~ , that the test narrowed the curriculum and deprofessionalized teachers. But, as Reese writes, "once written tests entered the schools, they were never going to leave." Still, most students complied. The opt-out is a relatively new phenomenon - a response to the age ofuniversal, high-stakes testing. · ·· .' ,~ ,, ··1~~ff1~'@lllmwª_Ps_: ~-g~-~~~f_W,t1Ø r1·~~.~~,¡~·~·âh~:;~cf:t~1··~:: '.~Hf~:Í·/;~ ~:l. aw.:~~vyy.2t.,,..,,....~ .. ,~§=.@ ~L .. ,,,....,:X.Æ..~1 . J . The state commissioner of education scolded the affluent district in an officialletter the following fall, ordering school officialsto punish students if they repeated the stunt. I alarm about "Obamacore," while teachers unions are asking for more professional autonomy. High-stakes testing
  29. 29. H ·st · 11 ~~,:i:~:'¥.~î:;e"~."s'Mt~a·,:,;¡;·1î1X~èlt.JW~~''e:;,sr't~s1'~~'l,a·;·,_:,:i;-~+'A'Q;'i'c,"Bil,·'8"mt;l'l~P~""'a-··.-.···1"e"··1P''e)7JW)ll'.r-c.1~=-]:l;r.f~Wa""'~~"1i·e-~"ª:i-·.¡;~ffi..1~'·"'fm -1~~~1· 1~ one~ y, ~~i,:g¡.1. ll!;!.W..il.,~~t :n Y-e.,tM.w.r~¥~~:fü·i,·.~,W.1,,~l,l,,.1X..•J;~g._~~.y;,_S_M __.::;.J:¡,!i._1;;?.~t:t~~"..til,~Y.11i:s.i.e..~P~ll!Ul!@S't and don't reflect a great depth oflearning, said James Pellegrino, co-director of Learning Sciences Research Institut~ at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a leading expert.on student assessment. Pellegrino said that because every child is now tested every year from third through eighth grades and once in high ~hoo~~~dbecauæ, ,~;..~,Yv~ ' Pellegrino warned. "If we have shallow tests §Øi._1l.:œJ'· -~~~ " Pellegrino said. "As a consequence, they won't teach to the standards - they'll teach to "Youget into a mode of mass production, and mass production doesn't alwaysget tuned to the highest levels of quality," Pellegrino said. "It's not like you couldn't do it, but it's very costly to produce high-quality assessments on an ongoing basis with the sort of scope and scale" used in the United States. the test." Assessing complex skills tmlmf' or groups of test questions designed around a common theme and On the end-of-year exams, King said high school students might be asked to imagine being a staff member in a congressman's office.The congressman has asked the staffer to write a short memo explaining the pros and cons of nuclear power and provide a recommendation on what position the congressman should take, including the justification for the recommendation. The student would be given background materials to read and would need to evaluate the credibility of the background materials before constructing a cogent, concise argument. David Connerty-Marin, a spokesman for PARCC,said . They will, for example,~9,')_Y~, ... , . t . , . They also will evaluate reading and writing scores at every grade (currently, few states u.st writing at every grade level) and gauge whether students are on track to be "collegeready" when they graduate from high school.
  30. 30. •bepth of knowledge' In Michigan, which has seen its share of controversy over the Common Core, Joseph Martineau, the deputy superintendent for accountability services, said ·~im~~Ft'~iJ'la~mfill$.m.ii~ ( , the Michigan Educational Assessment Program, or MEAP.Smarter Balanced wi11 ' .: .... ~êisfß.··n:·,~.. ~. m. ~~~~~!t.ll'IJ!m. . , they can also be administered over a longer period, whereas the previous state tests had to be administered on a single day to prevent cheating. Martineau said th ' "We would not have been able to afford to develop the kind of quality that was developed t~rough the consortium.f •' ._. ;. . he said. '. - Stateline.org
  31. 31. • ,on
  32. 32. su~~o~te~s a~d a~~o~e~ts Our PARCC movement has appealed to many people. Not only do we have many supporters we also so have Opponents. We are planning to appeal to the ones opposing our alternative for PARCC in by part taking in civil disobedients. We are planning to protest against their opinion in hopes to persuade them that PARCC is not in the best assessment to prove what the students have learned throughout the year .. PARCC also affects the way teachers are rated and this assessment is unfairly bring rates down. Some of the group of people we have supporting us are mainly our peers. Most of our teacher, our Principle, and many groups of students all across the districts. We don't have many upper executive supporters yet, but we are hoping to appeal to the State Board of Education. The State Board of education will give us the power we need to carry out our Alternative policy of going back to the OAA state assessment. We will need to influence them to make a change in their state testing system. Although, we have a great amount of supporters we also have many opponents we need to influence. Some of these groups consist of many of our peers, many teachers, and and the people of the district. We have to influence the teacher that this assessment is failing them. Teachers are evaluated by three things, which consist of Teacher performance, Alternative Component, and Student Growth. If our students are not prepared for this assessment, and don't meet the standards of this test how can a teacher be rated on their growth. If the student are failing the test, because teachers didn't have to resources to prepare them for the assessment, how can you tell if the teacher is doing his/her job or not. The assessment is unfairly failing both the students and teachers, which also makes our school as a whole look bad. Refuse the Te$t OPT OUT OF PAR CC CommonCoroForum.<>rg [i] Common Core Sorum The State Government is this biggest opponent our group needs to influence. The State Government agrees with the idea of PARCC "Challenging the student", and PARCC being the "New and Improved". We would need to influence them to have an open mind. We are hoping they would see our views and consider our policy. Other than the State Government, There are many supporters in that field. There are not many others we may need to influence, but if needed we will do so.
  33. 33. Basically we are going to be taking all the evidence we have received so far in our project and making a video of it. The evidence we have all come from reliable sources and surveys. Every website we used to find information is listed in each of the panels bibliography. We'll have a table of content in the beginning of our binder so you know where to find everything in the binder. We have dividers in the binder labeled as the panel numbers and more. Our information we gathered is very helpful to us because we needed some type of proof to prove to them a lot of people dislike the PARCC tests. Keep in mind when you see our surveys that they are from all kinds of different people they could be 7th or 8th graders men or women and even adults. Our surveys really have no limit of whos taking it because we want our evidence to be very distinctive so as long as you have some connection with PARCC you can take it whether it be you are taking it or you're giving the test or even your children are taking it. Also even though you may think that everyone in the United States has to take the test they don't PAR CC is ran by state so if your state governor says its a good idea to take PARCC tests every public school has to do so unless you or your school opt out. Some states may not want you to opt out though because it will cause a lot of stress and hectic moments in the mean time of getting some sort of test in place instead of the PARCC. PARCC States http://www.parcconline .org/ 1• ·~·'· . • Il
  34. 34. ou~ ActltM Pan We are going to be making a video to present to the Board of Education and maybe even the state. We decided to make a video so we can share our results and information to inform everyonewhy we don't like PARCC. Most people have many differentviews on state testing and whether or not PARCC should be in place. We will also be interviewingadministrators like teachers, the principal, board members and more. We will start by getting questions in order to ask our different groups of teachers we'll be writing our questions in a journal along with the responses. We are going to be emailing teachers and asking them when the best time to interview them is and keeping note of when and where. We'll be recording clips of the interviews to put in the video and be asking them to record a short entry so that we can insert that as well. The video will mainly focus on differentviews on the PARCC but we will also give a lot of background information on PARCC and OAA's. This is what we will be doing as our step to get rid of PARCC. Mer we gather all the information, video clips, and interviews we will be editing it and turning it into this great inspirationalvideo. We basically just want PARCC removed from our school and to allow us to pick what WE want to take. Think about it would you be trying your absolute best on a test you dread taking? I don't think so. So why not allow us to pick so you can have the best test score results for the district? Exactly there is no point. Parccïnu AT ANY. TllVlliE N<> iPCl rc:·c::= T·~s.t-i 111 g :Ze> ri te- -o
  35. 35. Menu (http://www.nj.com/) Subscnbe Slgn ln Search PARCC: What happens if students 'opt out?• few Jersey schools am pmparir1gtor how to handle students w 110 refuse lo take the new PARCC ex urts. (Express Tirn:~s file photo) n lhttp://conncct.nj.com/staffladamclark/index.htmn ByAdam Clark I NJ Advance Medla for g NJ.com lhttp://connect.nl,com/staff/adamctarklp.l!filliJllrn!l · Email the author I Follow on Twitter lhttps://twitter.com/rcalAdamClarkl on January 25, 2015 at 7:41 AM, updated January 25, 2015 at 9:40 AM NewJersey students in grades 3 to 11 willtake the state's new standardized tests this March. But LilaLofving,a seventh-grader at Montclair's Mount Hebron Middle School,won't be ciné of them, her mother says. Martha Evans says she will refuse to allow Lila,a straight-A student, to take the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (http://www.parcconline.org) exam, whichshe thinks is unnecessarily difficult, among other concerns. "I think it's a horrible test," Evanssaid. "I don't think it has any assessment value, and I don't want her taking it." AcrossNewJersey, districts arc preparing for how they will respond to students like Lila,part of a building "opt-out" movement aimed at the PARCCexams, computerized tests designed to he more challenging than their predecessors. The state says it has no policyaddressing whether students can opt out of standardized tests, but the Department of Education has advised districts that the tests are mandatory ane! that schoolsshould consult their discipline ane! attendance policiesif students refuse to take MORE,EDUCATION 'Under God' will stay in district's Pledge of Allegiance after group drops fight {http://www.nj.com/monmouth/index. ln Newark public schools election, Newarkers have chance to Jet their voice be heard I Opjnjon {http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ss1 Dean of Rutgers planning school and wife leaving $3.5 million to university {http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/21 Dear Teacher: Don't have students write to a cop killer. Sincerely. N,J. I Editorial {http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ss1 statewjde pajd sjck leave discredits employers who already offer it, Congress' cuts of college funding no accident I Letters Chttp://www.nj.com/opioion/jn~ Sponsored by. [11~,:s~~,~22] (http1/ads.ni.ct>m/Rea1Media/ads/click lx.ads/www.nj.com/education/2015 Most Read Trending Videos cw York Klents dont take th, Active Discussions 1 N.J. teacher speaks out after suspension for third-graders' 'get well' letters to convicted cop killer (VIDEO) (http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2015/04/nj_teacher__sp, (301 conrnmts) 2 N.J. native, an Arizona cop, caught on dashcam running down suspect {VIDEO) (http://www. nj.com/newslindex.ssf/2015/04/former_nj_mar {39ccnrmnts) 3 Christie urging Social Security reform with an eye to 2016 {http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/04/christie_ urgit (318 comS nts) 4 Poll: Do you agree with Christie that U.S. Social Security retirement age should be raised to 69? (http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/04/poll do you (12 corrrS nts) 5 Jersey City investigating Howell collision Involving city car driven by police officer (http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2015/04/jersey _city il All Stories {bup¡//toplc,.nt.com/tag/educatlon/po11ts.btml} (12 cormums)
  36. 36. them. See more comments» (http://www.nj.com/interact/) Superintendents say they are followingthat state (http://ads.nj.com/RealMedia/ads/click lx.ads/www.nj.com/cducation/2015/01/what directive,whileat the same time concedingtheycan't force a student to take a test. The state has also advised schoolofficialsto steer the conversation awayfrom whether students can refuse the PARCCtests and toward the benefit of taking the exams, which focuson criticalthinking and strategy more so than content. "ThePARCCexams, unlike anything elsewchave ever done in the state, willprovide much more robust information about your child's education, howthe schoolscan help them, howyou as a parent can help them," Education Commissioner DavidHespesaid, Students arc not required to take the PARCCtests to moveto the next grade level.And unlike the HighSchoolProficiencyAssessment,which had been givento rith-graders, PARCCwillnot he a graduation requirement, at least not until 2018. A fewdistricts have been proactiveabout clarifyingfor parents whether students who refusethe test willhe offered alternative learning activities,whichthe state says districts are not required to do. But others haveso far remained mum unless specificallyasked. Someparents fear students couldbe forcedto "sit and stare," an approach certain schoolsacross the country have adopted in response to opts outs. Sarah Tepper Blaine of Montclair, an education bloggerwhosaysher daughter will refuse the fourth-grade test, said the lackof a universal policyhas left parents unsure what to expectiftheir students refuse to take the PARCCon test clay. "I don't think it's clear to anyone at this point," Blainesaid. Opt-out movement grows NewJersey is one of 11 states, along with the Districtof Columbia,in the PARCC consortium that developedthe common set oftests in math and language arts. More than 20 states were originallyinvolvedhut the number continues to drop as support wanes.The tests are aligned with the newstandards introduced in classrooms last year, called Common Core íltttp://www.c01·estandards.org). With the debut of the PARCC tests loomingin NewJersey, the localopt-out movement is experiencinga groundswell,said Jean McTavish,a member of United Opt Out-NJ, a branch of a national organization that promotes opting out as a wayfor parents to get a seat at the table with decision makers in education. "It is explodingin NewJersey," MeTavishsaid. That was evidencedat January's state Boardof Education meeting, where nearly 100 people signed up for public testimony. (11Up://ads.ni çom/RealM¡di@l¡ls'/elii,knhœdîJß,MIM,jcJialnllslotialtid11/¡IO rt11tp:J/ads.nl.com/Realfrndi@tds'/elS kknll<:Bfls/,',w,LIMUwamli:<fni: •...:~ fhttp:Jtads.nl.com/Realtredl@úls'/elö,j(ni¡S mm/JiwajMffcJialnlè<latiaiti<111t:lO ;a;:;;,;:,:~~::::~'"" llJ...·~.•.'l~.. ~i:~~~e~,~~~ic~~~~ ~c~~~octc>r ~~ will never tell you. • The 10 MostAlfor,fable Cars of 2014. Advt:rtiœmAnt ~·.~·=·Ohio Driwrs Feel Stupid For Not t ..:..,.·~ ,Knawiny This New Rule t2~t ··..·~.··..•....·. ~i:~~~~e~1~,~~ic~~:::,ª!~~~actor · 'I>., will never tell you. P' .•. '..·.· •.. 16 Child Stars Who Grew Up To • , Be Super Altractiw! , • Auveulsemant Parents, some holding "NO PARCCING" signs or wearing "Opt-out" shirts íblln://www.nj.com/education/2015/ollpa1·cc exams blasted by parents teacher students at open fomm.html), calledfor the state to abandon the PARCCtests. Somestudents said they wouldrefuse to take them. McTavish,a NewYorkCityschoolprincipal whose children attend RidgewoodPublic Schools,said NewJersey is followingin the footsteps of NewYork,where thousands of students reportedly skipped schoollast spring rather than show up to take their annual state tests. Educators agree the movement is spreading, though it's unclear to what degree. Opposition is vocalin some communities, like Montclair,hut superintendents in some others saythey have barely heard a peep. PARCC supporters, who count the state's PTAand association ofschool administrators among them, have said they believemuch of the opposition stems from a general dislike of the CommonCore. Opponents, however,say their concerns nm deeper.
  37. 37. Many critics say the questions are too confusing and the format is too complex, especially for younger students. Lila said she wanted to take the PARCC exams, despite her mother's concerns, until she took a practice test at school. She was confused by a question asking about the underlying teme of a sentence in a story, she said. Another question directed her to select the best answer when she thought none of the answers were great, she recalled. An "opt our: shirt worn by Mrntclair parent Colleen Martine, at the New Jersey Board of Education meeting (!'dam Clark I NJ Aívance ~dta for NJ.com) "Notonlywas it hard, the questions were reallycomplicated and they were, like, deceiving,"said Lila,13. "Eventually,once I had deciphered what they wanted, I had to rush to he able to finish it." Lilanowagrees with her mom thatshe shouldn't take the test. In addition to findingit confusing,she says practice tests are taking awayfrom instructional time. "Wehave alwaystold her, 'We are goingto do what wcthink is hest foryou,' "Evans said. "I do not think taking the PARCCis hest for her." In Montclair, parents have urged the schoolhoard to adopt a policyallowingstudents whowant to skip the test to receive other learning opportunities during testing periods. A vote is expected at Monday's school board meeting. No state policy In California,state law has long given parents the right to opt students out of tests, said BohSchaeffer,public education director for FairTest/the National Center for Fair and Open Testing (http://www.fairtest.org1 a national advocacygroup. Butthe issue is so new that most states, likeNewJersey, have no legalor regulatory guidance on how to handle a student refusing to take a test for nonreligious reasons, he said. "In most cases, it is unplowed ground," Schaeffersaid. A memo Hespe sent to schools in October suggestingthatthey consult their disciplinary policieswas widelyinterpreted hy opt-out advocatesas advising schoolsto punish students who cometo school but refuse to take the test. Hespe later clarifiedthe state's stance in January, saying not everyrefusal to take the tests should he considered a disciplinary problem. "Certainlyif a student comes in and they arc disruptive, you should applyyour own disciplinary policy,"Hespe said. "If they are not disruptive, you should havea policyon what you do with that child." The BloomfieldBoard of Education passed a resolution in October sayingthe district won't punish students who skip the tests and willprovide alternatives, when possible. "Wethought it was necessary to have an idea in mind early in the schoolyear ofwhat wcwere goingto do," hoard President DanielAnderson said. "Weare not promoting it or condoning it, hut the reality is some parents maywant to have their child refusethe test." Becauseadministering the tests is required under law,districts must tell students that the tests are mandatory, regardless of howthey plan to handle those who refuse to take them, said Richard Bozza,executivedirector ofthe NewJersey Association of School Administrators.
  38. 38. "A district has no authority to say you may opt out," Bazza said. "What they can say is if children aren't participating we will provide another academic setting." Yet some districts are reticent to do even that, especially since federal law requires 95 percent of a school's student body to take a state's annual standardized test. North Brunswick Township, where more than 500 students piloted the PARCCtests last year, has had only a fewparents indicate they don't want their children to take them again, district Superintendent BrianZychowskisaid. ( Zychowskisaid he will inform parents at an upcoming information session that students who refuse the exams must stay in their classroomwhiletheir classmates test but willbe allowedto read. MillburnTownship PublicSchoolswillalso make students whorefusethe test stay in the classroom, though it hasn't determined what exactlythose students willdo, Superintendent James Crisfieldsaid. Students willreceivean excusedabsence iftheir parents keep them home from school,he said. At Kenilworthpublic schools,Superintendent ScottTaylorhasn't publicizedhis plan to advisestudents whowant to opt out ofthe tests to simplystay home.And, so far, he hasn't had any parents contact him, he said. "Theless I advertise this protocol,the more likelyI will not have that issue,"Taylor said. "I am really playingthis lowkey." Adam Clark muy be reachedat adam clark(á1niadvancemedia.com (mailto:adam clark@niadvancemedia.com). Followhim on tioitter at @realAdamClark(https:f/hvitter.com/realAdamÇlm•k). Find NJ.com on Facebook Ozttps:f/www.facebook.com/NJ.com). Lessons are learned and memories are made in U1e classroom, band room. gymnasium and cafeteria, on tile walk to school or during the ride on U1e bus. Gallery compiled l1y Greg Hatala I The Star-Ledger Greg Hatala I The Star-Ledger (bttp:llconnect.ni.com/userO,atalaqlphotos.htm/1 1/27 FORRENT Clark. NJ FORRENT upper Sadulø Riw.r. NJ nrrJersey Real Estate I ······························· . Garde~ ..-~.cii·.~~u~'-'-'!_! ----·
  39. 39. QG Do you believe the PARCC test is beneficial? Answered: 91 Skipped: O sun.eyMonkey Analyze - State Testing sur'Æy ves 90% 100% No 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Hes pons es Answer 010,ces ves 70,33% No 91 lotnl Q5 Do you feel tired after taking the tests? Answered: 90 Skipped: l 0% 10% 20% 30% 50% 60% 70% 90% 1()()%80%40% 19 11 rotnl 90
  40. 40. Q3 Do you feel that you should take the PARCC? Answered: 91 Skipped: O Yes No 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 80% 90"/o 100% Answer cnoices Yes 18.68% 17 No Totf.11 91 SureyMonkey Analyze - State Testing sur1.ey No Yes 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% lO"!o 80% 90% 100% Answer 010ices Yes No rotnl 90
  41. 41. Ql Do you like taking the PARCC? Answorod: 91 Skippod: O Yes No 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% b0% 60% 7ffi'o 80% 90% 100% B 83 9J. 101£11 Q2 How has it effected your grades? Answered: 91 Skipped: O Posltvely Negatively Notatall 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Answer Choices Positvcly Negatively Not at all 91 ]OWi

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