Crfc sg jun 11

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Crfc sg jun 11

  1. 1. STUDENT GUIDE FORCAREER RECRUITING FORCE CONTINUUM COURSE S-501-0007 PREPARED BY NAVY RECRUITER ORIENTATION UNIT (NORU) 385 Millington Avenue PENSACOLA, FLORIDA 32508 APRIL 2011
  2. 2. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 CHANGE RECORDNumber and Description of Change Entered By DateCh. 1 – OR Curriculum added CCH 18APR11Ch. 2 – Ethics/Prohibited Practices lesson modified CCH 19APR11 2
  3. 3. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 TABLE OF CONTENTSContents PageChange Record 2Table of Contents 3Section 1.0 - Course Outline Table 4Section 2.0 - Security Awareness Notice 6Section 3.0 - Safety/Hazard Awareness Notice 7Section 4.0 - How To Use Your Trainee Guide 8Section 5.0 - Terminal Objectives 10Section 6.0 - Information Sheet Table 14Section 7.0 – Problem Sheet Table 14Section 8.0 – Job Sheet Table 14Section 9.0 – Assignment Sheet Table 14Section 10.0 – Diagram Sheet Table 14Section 11.0 – Course Master Schedule 15Section 12.0 – Course Lessons 19 3
  4. 4. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 SECTION 1.0 COURSE OUTLINE TABLECRFC WEEK 1 Topic Outline SheetLesson Topic 1.1 Ethics & Prohibited Practices 1.1Lesson Topic 1.2 Operational Stress Control 1.2Lesson Topic 1.3 GENOFF Programs 1.3Lesson Topic 1.4 Medical Program Knowledge 1.4Lesson Topic 1.5 Medical market ID 1.5Lesson Topic 1.6 Reserve Structure 1.6Lesson Topic 1.7 Reserve Program Knowledge 1.7Lesson Topic 1.8 Reserve Market ID 1.8Lesson Topic 1.9 NAVET/DCO Affiliation 1.9Lesson Topic 1.10 Career Transition Office 1.10Lesson Topic 1.11 Reserve Bonus Programs 1.11Lesson Topic 1.12 Reserve Inst & Mob Dif 1.12Lesson Topic 1.13 Marketing Operations Plan 1.13Lesson Topic 1.14 Campus Data Notebook 1.14Lesson Topic 1.15 Speakers Bureau 1.15Lesson Topic 1.16 Diversity & Cultural Competence 1.16Lesson Topic 1.17 Credentialing 1.17Lesson Topic 1.18 Fitness & Nutrition 1.18Lesson Topic 1.19 Social Media 1.19Lesson Topic 1.20 Diversity Recruiting 1.20Lesson Topic 1.21 Collegiate Management 1.21Lesson Topic 1.22 Kit Building 1.22CRFC WEEK 2 Topic Outline SheetLesson Topic 2.1 Processing 2.1Lesson Topic 2.2 Prospecting 2.2Lesson Topic 2.3 Fairshare Goaling 2.3Lesson Topic 2.4 LCPO RPMS 2.4Lesson Topic 2.5 PRIDE 2.5Lesson Topic 2.6 Privacy Program 2.6Lesson Topic 2.7 Training 2.7Lesson Topic 2.8 Recruiting Personnel Management 2.8Lesson Topic 2.9 NIT Inspection Trends 2.9Lesson Topic 2.10 Awards & Incentives 2.10 4
  5. 5. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 SECTION 2.0 SECURITY AWARENESS NOTICE ***************************************************** This course does not contain any classified material. ****************************************************** 5
  6. 6. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 SECTION 3.0 SAFETY/HAZARD AWARENESS NOTICEThis notice promulgates safety precautions for students at Navy Recruiting Orientation Unit(NORU). All personnel must remain alert for any hazards within the training facilities. At aminimum, each individual is responsible for knowing, understanding, and observing all safetyprecautions applicable to NORU. In addition, you are responsible for observing the followinggeneral safety precautions: a. Each individual shall report for work rested and emotionally prepared for the tasks at hand. b. You shall use normal prudence in all your functions, commensurate with the work at hand. c. You shall report any unsafe conditions, or any equipment or material which you consider to be unsafe, and any unusual or developing hazards. d. You shall warn others whom you believe to be endangered by known hazards or by failure to observe safety precautions, and of any unusual or developing hazards. e. You shall report to the school any mishap, injury, or evidence of impaired health occurring in the course of your work or during non-training environment. 6
  7. 7. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 SECTION 4.0 HOW TO USE YOUR STUDENT GUIDEThis publication has been prepared for your use while under instruction. It is arranged inaccordance with the topics taught, and is in sequence with those topics. By using the table ofcontents you should be able to locate the lesson topics easily. By following the enclosed courseschedule, you should be able to follow the course of instruction in a logical manner.Under each topic there may be the following instruction sheets:• OUTLINE SHEETS: Provide a listing of major teaching points. The outline is consistent with the outline of the discussion points contained on the DDA pages in the lesson plan. It allows the trainee to follow the progress of lesson topic, to take notes as desired, and to retain topic information for future reference.• INFORMATION SHEETS: Amplify supplemental information from the reference materials for the course, from technical manuals, or from instruction books. You may be tested on this material during the course.• PROBLEM SHEETS: Normally used for paperwork troubleshooting when the equipment is not available. Can also be used for drill-and-practice problems related to the topic.• JOB SHEETS: Provide step-by-step instructions for developing your skills in performing assigned tasks and maintaining the equipment when and where the work is assigned, in the laboratory or practical areas.• ASSIGNMENT SHEETS: To assist you in being prepared for the lesson topics and laboratory/practical exercises BEFORE they are presented by the instructor or occur in the course.• DIAGRAM SHEETS: These are used as necessary to simplify the instruction. They are to aid you in understanding the systems, equipment, or topics presented.All of the instruction sheets are identified by their unit and lesson topic number. They arelisted in the order of their use. Each lesson topic will contain at least one EnablingObjective.The Enabling Objectives listed in this Guide specify the knowledge and/or skills that youwill learn during the course, and reflect the performance expected of you on the job. TheEnabling Objectives specify the knowledge and/or skills you will learn in a specific lessontopic. You should thoroughly understand the Enabling 7
  8. 8. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007Objectives for a lesson topic and what these objectives mean to you before you start eachlesson topic. Each learning objective contains behavior(s), conditions, and standards. Theyare defined as follows: The behavior is a description of the performance and/or knowledge that you will learn in that lesson topic; The conditions under which you will be able to perform or use the knowledge; The standard(s) to which you will be able to perform or use the knowledge.The objectives provide a means by which you can check your progress during training. Theobjectives also enable you to evaluate your training when you have finished, so you can ensurethat you have satisfied the goals of the course. Your instructor will explain the objectives to youat the start of the course. Feel free to ask for additional information during training if you feelthat you are not learning as you should.• STUDY TECHNIQUES:Classroom and laboratory sessions will be conducted by one or more instructors. You will beresponsible for completing the material in this guide, some of it before class time. Prior tostarting to use this guide, read through the front matter and become familiar with theorganization of the material, then follow directions below for each lesson topic: 1. READ the Enabling Objectives for the lesson topic and familiarize yourself with what will be expected of you. 2. STUDY each reading assignment. 3. WRITE any written assignment.• EXAMINATIONS AND QUIZZESExams and quizzes will be administered as required by the Course Master Schedule. A blitz is aninformal test used to check for understanding, and may be given by your instructor at any time.These quizzes do not count toward your final grade. In any event, only the material covered willbe tested. All written tests will be in the form of multiple choice, completion, or true/false items.Performance tests will be provided to test job skills as appropriate. Success on exams isdependent upon an understanding of the objectives, involvement in class activities, and goodstudy habits. 8
  9. 9. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 SECTION 5.0 TERMINAL OBJECTIVES1.1.0 Explain ethical behavior and prohibited practices to include Fraternization, Sexual Harassment, Government Vehicles, Government Travel Card, and Government Cell Phones, as it pertains to Navy Recruiting Command Personnel in accordance with Navy and NRC Directives.1.2.0 Recognize how Navy Operational Stress Control (OSC) can enhance your ability to prosper physically, emotionally and professionally.1.3.0 Identify General Officer Direct Accession and Collegiate programs.1.4.0 Identify Direct Accession and Collegiate programs; Program Authorizations and Program Managers.1.5.0 Identify the marketing plan and timelines for marketing medical programs.1.6.0 Explain the Reserve Structure.1.7.0 Explain the NAVET & DCO Programs for Navy Reserve Officers.1.8.0 Identify the competitive profiles, marketing concepts and timelines for reserve programs.1.9.0 Define NAVET and DCO affiliation.1.10.0 Explain the functionality of the Career Transition Office (CTO).1.11.0 Explain the incentives available for qualified Navy Reserve Officers.1.12.0 Describe the Mobilization Deferment policy for transition from Active Component to Reserve Component.1.13.0 Explain the Officers Marketing Operation Plan (MOP) including purpose, sections, and how to create a Plan of Action and Milestones to prevent failure.1.14.0 Explain the purpose of the Campus Data Notebook (CDN).1.15.0 Explain the procedures necessary to effectively utilize Navy Recruiting Commands Speakers Bureau Funds.1.17.0 Describe the credentialing process for Active/Reserve Dental Corps, Medical Corps (MC), Medical Service Corps (MSC), and Nurse Corps (NC).1.18.0 Explain the importance of proper fitness and nutrition in preparation for Officer Candidate School (OCS) and Recruit Training Command. 9
  10. 10. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-00071.19.0 Recognize how social media and social networking benefit Navy awareness.1.20.0 Demonstrate the ability to maximize Officer Recruiting Diversity Production, utilizing tools and strategies to become a successful U.S. Navy Officer recruiter in Outreach Markets.1.21.0 Describe the Collegiate Management Process and Reporting requirements.1.22.0 KIT BUILDING2.1.0 PROCESSING2.2.0 PROSPECTING2.3.0 Identify the process of goaling throughout Navy Recruiting Command.2.4.0 Demonstrate the ability to manage the Enlisted Recruiter Production Management System as a Leading Chief Petty Officer.2.5.0 Explain the programs and reports located in the PRIDE System and how they are used in the enlistment and management of Navy Applicants.2.6.0 Explain the NRC Privacy Program requirements as outlined in DoD Directive 5400.11, COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 5211.4 (Series), COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 1130.8 (Series) and COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 1131.2 (Series) as it pertains to Officer and Enlisted recruitment and processing.2.7.0 Utilize the Training Program to identify and correct production recruiter deficiencies to maximize productivity.2.8.0 Utilize Recruiter Development, Recruiter Qualification, and Recruiter Eligibility Boards to determine a recruiter’s ability to perform on recruiting duty. Initiate recruiting personnel actions, including fault/no-fault transfers, and NRD change of station/move procedures.2.9.0 Build a Plan of Action with Milestones to correct NIT Inspection discrepancies.2.10.0 Utilize Navy Recruiting Commands various awards and incentive programs to provide timely recognition to successful field recruiters.Back to Course Outline 10
  11. 11. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 OUTLINE SHEET 1.1 ETHICS AND PROHIBITED PRACTICESA. Introduction The mission and requirements of Navy Recruiting create a unique environment in which NRC personnel are consistently placed in situations requiring strict adherence to rules, regulations and ethical guidelines.B. Enabling Objectives 1.1.1 Describe NRC Fraternization policy as it pertains to applicants, prospects, DEP personnel, Future Sailors, and Collegiates. 1.1.2 Explain the policies regarding providing familiarization and/or coaching to prospects, applicants, DEP personnel, Future Sailors, and Collegiates. 1.1.3 Identify the four different types of recruiting irregularities and investigations. 1.1.4 Describe the authorized use of government vehicles (GOV) to include Domicile to Duty procedures, credit card use and limitations and emergency/accident procedures. 1.1.5 Explain the policies regarding government cellular phones. 1.1.6 Explain the policies and member responsibilities associated with the Government Travel Card.C. Topic Outline 1. Fraternization: Personal relationships that are unduly familiar between recruiting personnel, prospect, applicants, DEP personnel, Future Sailors, and Collegiates are prohibited. a. Prospect. Any person who has expressed to recruiting personnel an interest in enlisting or receiving an appointment in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Navy Reserve and who appears to possess the potential, or who may in the future possess the potential and qualifications for enlistment or appointment. 1) A prospect that expresses a loss of interest in enlistment or appointment shall continue to be a prospect under this instruction for a period of one year from the date they express this loss of interest. 2) Individuals who may in the future possess the potential and qualifications for enlistment or appointment include, but are not limited to, individuals who do not meet minimum age requirements, who score too low on the qualification testing but will be eligible to re-test, or who have not completed their education. 11
  12. 12. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 3) An individual who expresses an interest in enlistment or appointment but is permanently barred under existing regulations is not a prospect. b. Applicant: Any person who has commenced processing for enlistment or appointment in any of the Armed Forces. c. Future Sailor: Any person who accesses into the Delayed Entry Program of the United States Navy. d. DEP personnel: Any person who accesses into the Delayed Entry Programs of any of the Armed Forces. e. Collegiate: Any individual who has been selected and enlisted into one of the following programs: 1) Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program (BDCP) 2) Civil Engineer Corps (CEC) Exceptional Student Program 3) Nuclear Power Officer Candidate (NUPOC) 4) Naval Reactors Engineer (NRE) 5) Nuclear Power School Instructor (NPI) 6) Health Services Collegiate Program (HSCP) f. Recruiting Environment: Any function, gathering or meeting in a public or private place that recruiting personnel attend in their official capacity. 2. Prohibited Activities. Recruiting personnel shall not: a. Form or attempt to form a dating, private or unofficial social relationship with anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. b. Allow anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate to remain in any recruiting offices except for official business. c. Allow anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate to ride in any Government vehicle except for official purposes or ride in the personal vehicle of anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. d. Engage in consensual or nonconsensual physical contact with anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate when the contact is not authorized in the performance of official duties or required in an emergency to protect against injury, or in self-defense against an unprovoked attack. 12
  13. 13. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 e. Perform body fat measurements on any prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate of the opposite sex. If a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate requires measurement and none of the recruiting personnel at the station are of the same gender of that individual, the measurement can be delayed until the individual goes to MEPS for processing. f. Harass any prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. Harassment includes, but is not limited to: 1) Any language or act, which would, measured by an objective standard, constitute cruelty, oppression or maltreatment under article 93, UCMJ. 2) Abusive language which, when taking due consideration of the individual sensitivities of the victim, tends to degrade a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate whether directed at or used in the presence of such person. g. Use anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate to provide any benefit, financial or otherwise. h. Allow or invite any prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate to enter into, operate or be transported in the recruiting personnels private vehicle unless authorized in advance by a POV use authority for official purposes only. i. Gamble with any prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. j. Solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, anything of value from any source in return for granting favors, privileges or other preferential treatment to any prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. k. Borrow money or any articles of value from, lend the same to, anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. l. Offer to engage in, or engage in, any unofficial financial or business dealings with anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. m. Photograph or accept any pictures of anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate other than those required for official purposes. n. Spend the night with, or allow anyone known to be a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate to spend the night in the same home or apartment without prior command approval o. Process for enlistment or appointment, any person with whom they developed a social relationship prior to that person becoming a prospect, applicant, DEP 13
  14. 14. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate or prior to learning that person was a prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate. Recruiting personnel will refer such a person to another recruiter and disclose the nature of the relationship to the Commanding Officer via the Chain of Command. p. Enter any portion of an establishment known to be a MEPS lodging and/or meal facility, except that recruiting personnel may enter the main lobby of such a facility when their official duties make it necessary to assist in the proper check-in and check-out of an applicant and/or Future Sailor. q. Coach any prospect, applicant, DEP personnel, Future Sailor, or Collegiate to give false statements to NRC personnel to include but not limited to; Medical history, medical processing, criminal history, drug usage, education, and RTC processes or requirements. 3. Use of Government Vehicles a. Transportation of military and civilian personnel officially participating in public ceremonies, military field demonstrations, and parades directly related to official activities. Transportation of other individuals (e.g., hitchhikers, friends, family members) is prohibited. b. Transportation of prospective military recruits may be provided in connection with interviewing, processing, and orientation. 1) Individuals requesting authorization to use a GOV for transportation between domicile and place of duty must submit a written request, to an authorized official prior to the date of such use is requested. c. Domicile-to-Duty is the use of GOVs for transportation between an individual’s Domicile and place of duty. It is permitted only when: the Individual has an assignment or official obligation away from their regular duty station which requires them to either proceed directly to the place of an assignment, or obligation, without reporting first to their regular duty station, or to return from such place of assignment or obligation after normal duty hours. 1) Individuals requesting authorization to use a GOV for transportation between domicile and place of duty must submit a written request, to an authorized official prior to the date of such use is requested. d. Safety Regulations apply to all personnel operating Government-owned or controlled motor vehicles. Personnel shall comply with current instructions. 1) All vehicle operators will conduct themselves in a manner, which will not endanger or cause injury to themselves or others. 14
  15. 15. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 2) Safe/defensive driving shall be practiced at all times. 3) No individual shall operate a Government-owned or leased motor vehicle while consuming, or within a period of eight hours after consuming, any quantity of alcoholic beverage. 4) Consuming or permitting the consumption of alcoholic beverages by any occupant of a Government motor vehicle is prohibited. 5) The driver has the responsibility for maintaining the mechanical and cosmetic condition of the vehicle. e. Monthly Vehicle Log Report shall be forwarded within 5 calendar days of the end of each month to the NRD Vehicle Coordinator. f. Emergency/Accident Procedures. Vehicle operators must report any accidents and incidents immediately by telephone to the Logistics Support Department and the chain of command. This includes damage resulting from accidents, thefts, vandalism, or arising from natural phenomena. 1) Within three working days of an accident, the motor vehicle accident reporting kit, which is contained in the glove compartment of each vehicle, shall be submitted by the operator in involved in the accident/mishap to the Logistics Support Department. If you are involved in an accident: (a) Take necessary emergency action. (b) Do not sign or make a statement as to responsibility except to your supervisor or Government Investigator. Do not engage in arguments at the accident scene. Do not divulge personal insurance information. (c) Get names and addresses of all persons involved and extent of injuries, if any. (d) If it is a serious accident, report by telephone to your supervisor. g. Credit Card Use. Tight security of credit cards shall be maintained. Upon completion of a trip and at the end of each working day, credit cards will be removed from the vehicle and placed in a secure location. h. On all purchases, the vehicle operator shall ensure that the number of gallons, price per gallon, value of purchase, vehicle tag number, mileage, and driver’s signature are on the driver’s copy of the receipt. Copies of all credit card purchase receipts will be forwarded monthly to the district Vehicle Coordinator. Guidelines are as follows: 1) Use self-service pumps only. 2) Fraudulent use of the credit card is subject to criminal prosecution. 15
  16. 16. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 3) Procurement of the following items with a credit card is unauthorized: (a) Waxes and polishes (b) Storages and parking (c) Tires and tubes (d) Batteries (e) Routine repairs (f) Items for personal use i. Vehicle Care/Maintenance/Repair. The vehicle operator has the primary responsibility for maintaining the mechanical and cosmetic condition of the vehicle to include safety items. If unscheduled or Emergency/After hour repairs are needed and the GSA MCC cannot be reached for authorization, the driver must notify the LSO/Vehicle Coordinator. 4. Cellular Telephones a. Use of cellular telephones is for official business only. Use of the cellular phone for other than authorized purposes is prohibited. b. Cellular phone users are encouraged to use government communications lines whenever possible (i.e., in office). Excessive use of cell phones may result in un- programmed additional charges such as exceeding contract minutes. c. Directory assisted calls are very costly, and as a result, are PROHIBITED. d. The individual assigned a cellular phone is responsible for safeguarding against unauthorized use, and loss or destruction of the cellular phone and accessories. 5. Government Travel Charge Card. All military and DoD civilian employees are required to apply for the government travel card. The government travel card is the primary means by which travelers will receive cash advances, pay for lodging, meals, rental vehicles, etc. while TAD only. The cardholder will: a. Limit use of card for official TAD travel expenses only. Use for other than official business can result in a disciplinary action I.A.W. the UCMJ. b. Pay financial obligations to bank on time. c. Notify Agency Program Coordinator of any changes. 16
  17. 17. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 d. Use of the split pay option (mandatory for all military personnel) upon travel liquidation. e. Assume liability for all billed charges. Cardholder must pay on time whether or not reimbursement has been received. 6. Familiarization/Coaching are methods directing, instructing and training a person or group of people, with the aim to achieve some goal or develop specific skills. a. Coaching any prospect, Applicant, DEP personnel, or Future Sailor to give false statements to NRC and RTC personnel is Strictly Prohibited. These include but not limited to; medical history, medical processing, criminal history, drug usage, and education. b. ASVAB Familiarization/Coaching. Several information devices are available to familiarize applicants with the ASVAB: (1) Use of the official ASVAB website is authorized (2) Use of the Enlistment Screening Test (EST) is authorized. (3) Sample for School Officials. An ASVAB specimen set is a sample for school Officials to familiarize them with the institutional ASVAB. NRC personnel are strictly prohibited from using it to familiarize applicants or students. (4) Study Guides. Several ASVAB information/study guides, such as the ARCO ASVAB preparatory study guide, have been commercially produced. Use of these commercial publications by NRC personnel is Strictly Prohibited. It is recognized that these commercial publications are available to applicants; however, NRC involvement with these publications is limited to informing applicants that they are available in some stores. Under no circumstances shall NRC personnel use a commercial ASVAB study guide to familiarize applicants with the ASVAB. NRC personnel are prohibited from possessing any ASVAB Study Guides. (5) Schools. NRC personnel must NOT refer applicants to any commercial ventures or schools whose purpose is to familiarize applicants with the ASVAB. NRC personnel may not offer their services to these schools, act as a distributor for their information materials, or become involved with them in any way. (6) NRC personnel must be fully aware that acts which are conducive to test loss or compromise will not be tolerated and that individuals who are found to have aided or abetted test compromise will be subject to disciplinary action under the UCMJ. 7. Recruiting Irregularities and Investigations a. Malpractice: Malpractice is concealment of or conspiracy to conceal a disqualifying factor of an applicant; action to qualify an ineligible applicant in violation of 17
  18. 18. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 directives; or any intentional violation of recruiting policy or procedure, which results in the processing and enlistment of an ineligible applicant. A person in recruiting, while dealing with an applicant or processing an application for enlistment is guilty of malpractice when he/she intentionally violates an established law, regulation, written policy or directive in order to enlist an applicant who does not meet the basic enlistment eligibility requirements. b. Erroneous enlistment: An enlistment agreement into which the government would not have entered had the true facts been known or had the legal conclusion based on such facts been correctly reached at that time. c. Fraudulent enlistment: An enlistment with deliberate misrepresentation, omission or concealment by an applicant to the government, which, if know at the time, might have resulted in rejection of that applicant. d. Misconduct: Conduct that does not affect the enlistment qualifications of the applicant, but which is in violation of regulations or policy. e. Every alleged or apparent recruiting or enlistment processing irregularity is to be acted upon and investigated at the appropriate level to determine if it occurred and how it could have been prevented. f. Investigation Procedures: The investigation will be conducted only by an impartial commissioned officer, Warrant Officer or senior enlisted person, (E-7, E8, or E9). g. Congressional inquiries. The most common inquires are: 1) Promised reclassification in RTC 2) College graduates promised commissioning after RTC 3) Fraternization 4) Harassment of potential applicants from recruiters e. CNRC Hotline complaints. Most common complaints are: 1) Quality of life – working hours. 2) Recruiting Procedures – DEP Discharge request. 3) Misconduct – Misuse of GOV vehicle. 4) Command Policies – Relief of position. 8. Summary & Review 18
  19. 19. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 9. Application 10. Assignment: NoneBack to Course Outline 19
  20. 20. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-1 ETHICS AND PROHIBITED PRACTICESA. Introduction This information sheet provides references and abbreviations used in this lesson.B. References 1. OPNAVINST 5354.1 (Series), Navy EO Policy 2. COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 1130.8 (Series) 3. COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 5370.1 (Series) Fraternization 4. COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 1137.3 (Series), Invest. & Reporting of Allegations & Complaints 5. SECNAVINST 5350.15 (Series), DON Core Values 6. COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 4400.1 (Series) Logistics Support Manual 7. COMNAVCRUITCOMINST 2061.2 (Series) Telecommunications Service 8. http://www.asvabprogram.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=overview.testC. InformationASVAB Armed Services Vocational Aptitude BatteryBDCP Baccalaureate Degree Completion ProgramCEC Civil Engineer CorpsEST Enlisted Screening TestDEP Delayed Entry ProgramGSA MCC General Services Administration, Maintenance Control CenterGOV Government VehicleHSCP Health Service collegiate ProgramNPI Nuclear Power School InstructorNRE Naval Reactors EngineerNUPOC Nuclear Power Officer Candidate 20
  21. 21. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 OUTLINE SHEET 1.2 OPERATIONAL STRESS CONTROLTerminal Objective:1.2.0 Recognize how Navy Operational Stress Control (OSC) can enhance your ability to prosper physically, emotionally and professionally.Enabling Objectives:1.2.1 Identify common sources of stress.1.2.2 Describe indicators of the four phases in the Stress Continuum.1.2.3 Identify actions for managing stress reactions and injuries and getting help for stress illnesses.1.2.4 Explain your role in OSC.Topic Outline:1. Introduction2. What is Stress? a. The process by which we respond to challenges to the body or mind. b. Stress can be positive or negative.3. Operational Stress Control a. Comprehensive approach to prevent, identify & manage the adverse effects of Operational Stress and Stress injuries on the health and readiness of Sailors. b. OSC is not just for “operational” commands in the historic sense. It is for all Navy personnel, in any mission, any environment. c. OSC seeks to create an environment where Sailors, commands and families can thrive in the midst of stressful operations. Just as world-class athletes gain the winning edge by using every means at their disposal – coaches, trainers, even sports psychologists – our world-class Sailors need to employ every available resource to stay fit, ready and resilient as well as seek assistance for stress reactions early before they become problems. 21
  22. 22. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 Causes of Stress a. The levels of reported stress have shown significant increase in recent years in both the officer and enlisted ranks. b. Of the top ten reported causes of stress Navy-wide, most will still apply while on recruiting duty. c. Stressors can have different effects on Sailors and their families.4. Impact of Negative Stress a. Irritability b. Physical symptoms (migraine, fatigue, weight gain/loss, trouble sleeping) c. Decrease in work quality or output d. Damaged Relationships (personal /professional) e. Compromise of morals or ethics f. Depression/Suicide5. Stress Continuum – Refer to Information Sheet 1.2-1 a. The goal of Navy OSC is to get back to Green. 1. Ready – Green - To stay mission ready. Keep fit, eat right, relax and balance. 2. Reacting – Yellow - To recover and build resilience. Get adequate sleep, talk to someone you trust. 3. Injured - Orange - To begin healing. Talk to a chaplain, counselor or medical provider. 4. Ill – Red - To get help. Seek medical treatment.6. Your Role in OSC a. Help build positive relationships b. Help to foster trust c. Communicate d. Help others to see the bigger picture 22
  23. 23. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 e. Refer to the right resources7. Resources a. Shipmate, family member, or command leadership b. Ombudsman c. Fleet and Family Support Center d. Doctor, nurse or other medical staff member e. Military One Source (www.militaryonesource.com) f. Chaplain/Religious leader (www.navychaplaincare.navy.mil) g. Navy Operational Stress blog (www.navynavstress.com) h. Navy Stress Facebook Page (www.facebook.com/navstress) i. Navy Personnel Command Suicide Prevention (www.suicide.navy.mil)8. Summary & Review a. Stress is a fact of life, some stress can actually push us to achieve our personal best, but it’s important to know how to recognize when stress is becoming a problem. Using the Stress Continuum can help you learn more about the signs and symptoms of too much stress, as well as what you can do to help yourself or your shipmates stay healthy.9. Application a. None10. Evaluation a. CBT11. Assignment a. None12. Back to Course Outline 23
  24. 24. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 INFORMATION SHEET 1.2-1 OPERATIONAL STRESS CONTROLA. Introduction This information sheet provides references used in this lesson.B. References 1. Navy Operational Stress blog (www.navynavstress.com) 2. Navy Stress Facebook Page (www.facebook.com/navstress) 3. Navy Personnel Command Suicide Prevention (www.suicide.navy.mil)C. Information 24
  25. 25. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 OUTLINE SHEET 1.3 GENERAL OFFICER (GENOFF) PROGRAM KNOWLEDGETerminal Objective:1.3.0 Identify General Officer Direct Accession and Collegiate programs.Enabling Objectives:1.3.1 Describe the difference between OCS and ODS General Officer programs.1.3.2 Identify General Officer Programs.Reference:1. COMNAVCRUITCOM INST 1131.2 (Series)2. Program AuthorizationsTopic Outline:1. Introduction2. Introduction to General Officer Programs (GENOFF). a. What are GENOFF Programs? Usually when someone says GENOFF they mean everything other than medical and reserves. b. GENOFF designators include all designators (Unrestricted Line, Restricted Line, & Staff Corps) that go to Officer Candidate School (OCS) plus a few that go to Officer Development School (ODS) (JAG, Chaplain, Nuke Instructor and Naval Reactors Engineer). c. OCS GENOFF: (1) 1390 Pilot (Naval Aviator) (2) 1370 Naval Flight Officers (NFO) (3) 1160 Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) (4) 1460 SWO Engineering Duty Officer Option (SWO-EDO) (5) 1160-1800 SWO Oceanography Option (SWO-METOC) (6) 1160-1600 SWO Information Professional Option (SWO-IP) (7) 1160-1640 SWO Information Warfare Option (8) 1600 Information Professional (9) 1180 Special Warfare SEAL (10) 1190 Special Operations EOD, UMCM, ODS, EOM 25
  26. 26. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (11) 1630 Special Duty Intelligence (12) 1640 Special Duty Information Warfare (IW) (13) 3100 Supply Corps (14) 1520 Aerospace Maintenance Duty Officer (AMDO) (15) 1650 Public Affairs Officers (PAO) (16) 5100 Civil Engineering Corps (CEC) (17) 5100 CEC Collegiate (18) 1810 Cyber Warfare Engineer (19) 1170/1160 NUPOC Sub & Surface (20) XXX7 Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program (BDCP) d. ODS GENOFF: (1) 2500 Judge Advocate General (JAG) (2) 1950 JAG Student (3) 4100 Chaplain (4) 1945 Chaplain Candidate Program (5) 1210 Nuclear Power School Instructor (6) 1220 Naval Reactors Engineer e. GENOFF programs are competitive (i.e. many applicants will not get selected even though they are qualified). Being qualified to apply does not mean an applicant will be selected. Selection is based on the whole person concept.3. Officer Candidate School (OCS) Programs. a. Pilot (1) Community Overview (a) Navy pilots are members of the select, highly skilled Naval Aviation team. The Navy maintains and operates more than 4,000 aircraft including carrier-based jets, land-based patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, transport planes and sea and land- based helicopters. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 27 at time of commission. (b) Waiver up to 24 months for prior AD service. (3) Education (a) BA/BS in any major; technical degrees preferred. (b) Min 2.5 GPA. 26
  27. 27. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (4) Testing (a) OAR-40; AQR-4; PFAR-5; PRT (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) API Basic/Intermediate Advanced Winged (18-24 mo) (c) FRS (6-12 mo) (6) Obligation (a) 8 yrs Active Duty from earning wings. b. Naval Flight Officer (NFO) (1) Community Overview (a) Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are members of the select, highly skilled Naval Aviation team. NFOs may be radar intercept officers, tactical coordinators or airborne electronic warfare specialists. The Navy maintains and operates more than 4,000 aircraft including carrier-based jets, land-based patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, transport planes and sea and land-based helicopters. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 27 at time of commission. (b) Waiver up to 48 months for prior AD service. (3) Education (a) BA/BS in any major. (b) No restrictions, but technical degrees preferred. (c) Min 2.5 GPA (4) Testing (a) OAR-40; AQR-4; FOFAR-5; PRT (5) Training 27
  28. 28. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) API (6 wks) (c) Basic/Intermediate/Advanced Winged (15 – 24 mo) (d) FRS (6 – 12 mo) (6) Obligation (a) 6 yrs Active Duty from date of designation as NFO. c. Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) (1) Community Overview (a) Surface Warfare Officers are Navy officers whose training and primary duties focus on the operation of Navy ships at sea and the management of various shipboard systems. Their ultimate goal is to command a Navy surface ship. Navy systems such as the vertical launch system that fires surface-to-air and cruise missiles require the skills and expertise of people trained in high-tech fields. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waiver up to 2 yrs for prior AD service. (3) Education (a) BA/BS (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35+ (b) PRT (higher scores are more competitive) (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) DIVO (6 – 10 mo) (c) SWOS (4 – 6 wks) 28
  29. 29. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (d) Complete DIVO tour (e) Specialty School (3 – 7 wks) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. d. SWO Engineering Duty Officer Option (SWO-EDO) (1) Community Overview (a) Engineering Duty (ED) Officers are the technical leaders of the United States Navy, and are a unique cadre of Naval officers who are highly educated, and have a broad continuum of operational experience and engineering expertise. EDs develop system-engineered, cost effective solutions to meet fleet war fighting requirements. We lead the integration of research and development, design, acquisition, construction, modernization, and life cycle management. (b) Engineering Duty Option Program. Ten Officer Candidate School quotas are available per year for this program. Officers begin their careers as conventional Surface Warfare Officers, and can exercise their option to become EDs after completing their warfare qualification, and a minimum sea tour, typically two years. Shortly after reporting to their ship, theyll be assigned a local ED mentor, available to provide information and answer questions. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waiver up to 2 yrs for prior AD service. (3) Education (a) BS/MS in Engineering or Science. (b) Req. evidence of academic excellence (B or better avg.) (c) Top ¼ of class. (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35; PRT 29
  30. 30. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) DIVO (6-10 months) (c) SWOS (4-6 wks) (d) Complete DIVO tour (e) NPS/MITEDO School (6 wks) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. (c) If NPS/MIT for MS, then additional 3 yrs for 1st yr and month for month thereafter. e. SWO Oceanography Option (SWO-METOC) (1) Community Overview (a) Special Duty (Oceanography) Officers (designator 180X) are commonly referred to in the fleet as Meteorology and Oceanography (METOC) Officers. The METOC Community is a small Restricted Line community of just under 400 officers (0.7% of the Navys Officer Corps). It is a technically oriented community that provides meteorological, oceanographic, and Geospatial Information and Systems (GI&S) support to the fleet. Also, it is a sea going community; about 16% of our billets are afloat on ships, staffs, or Mobile Environmental Teams. Seventy percent of our officers currently have warfare qualifications. (2) Age (a) Less than 35 years at time of commissioning. (3) Education (a) BS in Physical Oceanography or Meteorology is preferred, but not required. (b) Min. 2.2 GPA. C+ or better in Calc & Physics. (4) Testing 30
  31. 31. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) OAR – 35; PRT (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) DIVO (6-10 months) (c) SWOS (4-6 wks) (d) Complete DIVO tour (e) Basic Oceanography Accession Training (11 wks) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. (c) Officers must serve two years following re-designation to 1800 or until the completion of four years from the date of commission, whichever is greater. f. IP and SWO Information Professional Option (SWO-IP) (1) Community Overview (a) The IP community was established in October 2001 and is one of the newest officer communities in the Navy. IP officers plan, acquire, operate, maintain, and secure the Naval network and the systems that support Navys operational and business processes to ensure they are reliable, available, survivable, and secure. They evaluate and integrate cutting edge technologies, innovative concepts, and essential information elements to ensure a war fighting advantage. (b) Age Less than 35 years at time of commissioning. (2) Education (a) BS in Computer Science, Computer of Electrical Engineering, Math, Physics, Information Systems or Operations preferred, but not required. (b) Min. 2.2 GPA. C+ or better in Calc & Physics. (3) Testing (a) OAR – 35; PRT 31
  32. 32. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (4) Training (a) IP i OCS (12 wks) (b) SWO IP Option i OCS (12 wks) ii DIVO (6-10 months) iii SWOS (4-6 wks) iv Complete DIVO tour (5) Obligation (a) IP & SWO IP Option i 4 yrs Active from date of commission. ii Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. (b) SWO IP Option only i Officers must serve two years following re-designation to 1600 or until the completion of four years from the date of commission, whichever is greater. g. Special Warfare SEAL (1) Community Overview (a) The word SEAL is an acronym that stands for the environments in which Naval Special Warfare (NSW) units operate; the Sea, the air and the land. NSW personnel are organized, trained, and equipped to conduct maritime special operations across the spectrum of conflict. These highly trained specialists are deployed worldwide in support of joint and fleet operations. The unique training regimen in place to produce the basic SEAL operator is based on the four Special Operations Forces (SOF) Truths: Humans are more important than hardware; Quality is better than quantity; SOF cannot be mass produced; and, Competent SOF cannot be created after emergencies occur. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. 32
  33. 33. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (b) Waiver up to 2 yrs for prior AD service. (3) Education (a) BA/BS (b) Technical degree preferred. (c) Min 2.0 GPA. (Higher GPA more competitive.) (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35 (b) Physical Fitness Screen i Special Warfare/Special Operations Physical Fitness Screen consists of: swim 50 meters with mask, fins and snorkel to show waterborne confidence with no time limit; 500yd swim using breast/side stroke in 12.5 min (competitive time of < 9 min); 10 min rest; minimum of 42 push-ups in 2 min (competitive > 100); 2 min rest; minimum of 50 sit-ups in 2 min (competitive > 100); 2 min rest; minimum of 6 pull-ups with no time limit (competitive > 20); 10 min rest; and 1.5 mile run in boots and long pants in 11.5 min (competitive time < 9 min). (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) BUD/S (6 mo) (6) Obligation (a) 4 years Active from commission or 3 years from completion of training, whichever is longer. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. h. Special Operations Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD), Under-water Mine Counter Measures (UMCM), Operational Diving & Salvage (ODS), Expendable Ordnance Management (EOM). (1) Community Overview (a) The 1140 Navy Special Operations (SPECOPS) community comprises the war fighting communities of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) and Under-Water 33
  34. 34. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 Mine Countermeasures (UMCM) with expertise in Operational Diving and Salvage (ODS) and Explosive Ordnance Management (EOM). The Community offers a unique opportunity to motivated men and women who seek early leadership responsibilities and tough challenges. Assignments are based on performance, qualification, and personal desires, mirroring the URL warfare community. All aspects from initial training to command are included in the organization of the SPECOPS community. Junior officers are immediately trained as Navy Diving Officers and serve aboard Mine Countermeasures (MCM) and salvage ships to earn their qualification as Surface Warriors. After training in EOD, officers are immediately assigned as the Officer in Charge of EOD detachments, operating throughout the world. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of application. (b) Waiver up to 2 yrs for prior AD service. (3) Education (a) BA/BS (b) Technical degree preferred. (c) Min 2.0 GPA. (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35; Physical Fitness Screen (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) DIVO (6-10 months) (c) SWOS (4-6 wks) (d) Complete DIVO tour (e) Naval Diving & Salvage Training Center (18 wks) (f) EOD School (51wks 34
  35. 35. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (6) Obligation (a) 2 yrs Active after EOD School grad. or until completion of previously acquired min. obligated svc., whichever is longer. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. i. Intelligence (1) Community Overview (a) Naval intelligence officers provide tactical, strategic and operational intelligence support to U.S. naval forces, joint and multi-national military forces, and executive-level decision-makers in our national government. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 42 at time of commission. (b) No waivers. (3) Education (a) BA/BS in International Relations, Political Science, Gov’t, Engineering, Physical or Natural Science, and Comp. Science preferred. (4) Testing (a) OAR-35; AQR-3; PRT (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) Intel School (5 mo) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from commissioning. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. j. Information Warfare (IW) and SWO IW Option (1) Community Overview (a) Modern technology has created a different type of war often referred to as information warfare. Sea duty opportunities in the IW community takes many 35
  36. 36. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 forms from TAD deployments onboard ships and submarines, to PCS assignments aboard aircraft carriers, amphibious units, cruisers and destroyers, to staff assignments with the numbered fleet commanders. IW officers may be assigned to flight duty at commands which conduct fleet airborne reconnaissance operations. The Navys IW officers perform: i Naval Information Warfare and related functions as directed by the Chief of Naval Operations. ii National Signals Intelligence tasks assigned by the Director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service (DIRNSA/CHCSS). These functions include: iii Information Warfare (IW) support to deployed ships, submarines, and aircraft. iv Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) tasks assigned by both CNO and DIRNSA where appropriate. v Information Warfare (Protect) to minimize foreign exploitation of the Navys electromagnetic system. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 35 at time of commission. (b) No waivers. (3) Education (a) IW. BA/BS in Computer Science, Info. Systems, Mathematics, Physics, Electrical Engineering preferred. (b) SWO IW Option. BS in Computer Science, Math, Engineering, Physics and Foreign Area studies with a concentration in Language are preferred, but not required. Min. 2.2 GPA. C+ or better in Calc & Physics. (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35; PRT (5) Training IW (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) Crypto Officer Basic Course (13 wks) (6) Training SWO IW Option 36
  37. 37. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) DIVO (6-10 months) (c) SWOS (4-6 wks) (d) Complete DIVO tour (7) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. (c) SWO IW Option: Officers must serve two years following re-designation to 1640 or until the completion of four years from the date of commission, whichever is greater. k. Supply Corps (1) Community Overview (a) The Supply Corps is the United States Navys professional staff corps responsible for the supply phases of naval logistics. The broad responsibilities of the Supply Corps are closely related to those of many executive positions in private industry and embrace such areas as financial management, inventory control, merchandising, transportation, procurement, data processing, and personnel services, including feeding U.S. naval forces and operating the Navys Exchanges. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waiver up to 31 yrs prior to AD service. (3) Education (a) BA/BS in Math, Econ., Accounting, Business Admin., Finance, or Comp. Science/Info. Systems preferred. (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35; PRT (5) Training 37
  38. 38. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) Supply Corps School (24 weeks) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. l. Aerospace Maintenance Duty Officer (AMDO) (1) Community Overview (a) Aerospace Maintenance Duty Officers (AMDOs) are maintenance and logistics professionals with formal technical and managerial education. AMDOs use their extensive Fleet experience to provide leadership at all levels of the integrated logistics and operational support of Naval Aviation. No other designator mirrors AMDO education, Fleet experience, and knowledge of the integrated logistics system. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 35 at time of commission. (b) No waivers. (3) Education (a) BA/BS in Technical/ Business/Engineering/ Physical Science. (b) Min 2.0 GPA. (4) Testing (a) OAR-35: AQR-3; PRT (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) Aviation Maint. Officer School (10 wks) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs active from commissioning. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. 38
  39. 39. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 m. Public Affairs Officers (PAO) (1) Community Overview (a) A Navy Public Affairs Officer handles visual, audio and written communications for internal and public audiences, chooses the best media to deliver information, responds to reporters, and provides intuitive advice to top-level Navy decision makers. Navy Public Affairs Officers manage the flow of news and information for the Navy, the media and the public. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 35 at time of commission. (b) No waivers. (3) Education (a) BA/BS in English, Communication, PR, Journalism, Speech or Broadcasting. (4) Testing (a) OAR – 35; PRT (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) PAOC(10 wks (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. n. Civil Engineering Corps (CEC) (1) Community Overview (a) Hundreds of naval shore facilities worldwide-like small cities with hospitals, airfields, power plants, housing, stores, office buildings and much more-make up the fleet support establishment. As a Navy Civil Engineer Corps (CEC) officers are a special group of officers in charge of engineering, management, planning, construction and maintenance of the Navys shore facilities. Civil Engineer Corps officers may work in any or all of the following three areas: 39
  40. 40. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (b) Contract Management. (c) Public Works. (d) Construction Battalions. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waivers may be considered for those who would not exceed age 35 at commission. (3) Education (a) BS/MS in ABET accredited Engineering program (Civil/ Mechanical/Electrical, etc.) or NAAB accredited Architecture Program. (4) Testing (a) PRT (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) CECOS (13 wks) (c) Three tour areas: 1) Construction Management 2) Public Works 3) SEABEES (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. o. CEC Collegiate (1) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waivers may be considered for those who would not exceed age 35 at commission. (2) Education 40
  41. 41. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) Within 2 yrs of graduation in AABET/ NAAB accredited BS program (1 yr for MS). (b) Collegiate: Min 3.0 GPA and "B" or better all science/tech courses. (c) Applications will not be considered if prospect not already within the 24/36 month windows listed above. (3) Testing (a) PRT (4) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) CECOS (13 wks) (c) Three tour areas: 1) Construction Management 2) Public Works 3) SEABEES (5) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. p. Cyber Warfare Engineer (1) Community Overview (a) The Cyber Warfare Engineer was created as a means of addressing the increased demand for officers with specific computer network operations (CNO) focused knowledge, skills and abilities. Initial employment is focused on CNO capability/tool development under the purview of fleet cyber command. Selection is based on outstanding technical academic records in the field of computer science and computer engineering degree programs. After completion of obligation CWE’s are encouraged to laterally transfer into another community within the information dominance corps. (2) Age (a) Less than 35 years at time of commissioning. (3) Education 41
  42. 42. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) BS in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering. (b) Min. 3.0 GPA in all Technical/Math/Science courses. (c) One year of Calculus and Calculus-based Physics with a minimum grade of B. (4) Testing (a) PRT (5) Training (a) ODS (5 wks) (6) Obligation (a) 5 yrs Active from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. q. NUPOC Sub (1) Community Overview (a) Nuclear Trained Officers first tour of duty is spent learning and overseeing the operations of a nuclear propulsion plant, this is only a foundation on which much higher levels of responsibility are built. After mastering the engineering spaces and the theories behind nuclear power, junior officers learn more about communications, navigation, armament capabilities, and the tactical employment of the platform. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waiverable to 31. (3) Education (a) BA/BS/MS in preferred majors: Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry. (b) Within 2 ½ years of graduation (1yr - MS), with a minimum of: i 1 yr Calculus with C or higher ii 1 yr Calculus-based Physics with C or higher 42
  43. 43. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 iii Calculus must be through differential and integral calculus of one real variable. Physics must cover the classic fundamentals of mechanics, magnetism, and electricity. (4) Testing (a) PRT (5) Training (SUB) (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) NPS (6 mos) (c) Prototype (6 mos) (d) Sub School (13 wks) (e) Fleet qualify DNR, Wash., DC for Engineering Exam (6) Training (SURFACE) (a) OCS (12 wks) (b) DIVO (6-10 mos) (c) SWOS (4-6 wks) (d) Complete DIVO tour (e) NPS (6 mos) (f) Prototype (6 mos) (g) Fleet qualify DNR, Wash., DC for Engineering Exam (7) Obligation (a) 5 yrs from date of commission. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. r. BDCP (1160, 1370, 1390, 1460, 1860, 1520, 1630, 1640, 1800, 3100, 5100) (1) Program Overview 43
  44. 44. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) BDCP a very financially rewarding program for applicants and a tremendous tool for recruiters to attract top quality college students to begin a career as a Naval Officer. BDCP candidates are selected by an officer community (Aviation Officer and Surface Warfare Officer BDCP professional selections are made by NRC staff vice community representatives) when determined that the applicant possesses the desired skills, abilities, and professional growth potential desired by the specific community. Once professionally selected, the NRC staff conducts an evaluation of the applicants academic record and selection is based on the assessment of the individuals potential to meet the academic performance standards prescribed for the program. (2) Age (a) At least 18 and cannot exceed designator age limit prior to commission. (3) Education (a) Enrolled full time in accredited 4-yr college with at least 30 sem. or 45 qtr hrs. (b) Min. 2.7 GPA. (c) No waivers. (d) Candidates can be enrolled in the program for up to 36 months i For Technical Degrees: Generally, should have taken or be scheduled to take Calculus and Physics prior to graduation. Technical Degrees include: all Engineering, Architecture, Aeronautics, Operations Research/Systems Analysis/Operations Analysis, Meteorology/Climatology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Metallurgy, Mathematics, Computer Science (Math Oriented), Physics, Astronomy, Physical Sciences, and Statistics. (e) Applications will not be considered if appl not already within the 36 month window listed above. (4) Test (a) OAR-35 or as required by program designator (b) PRT (c) Others as required by program designator (5) Training (a) OCS (12 wks) 44
  45. 45. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (b) Follow-up training per designator (6) Obligation (a) Obligation upon commissioning as required by program designator4. Officer Development School (ODS) Programs a. Judge Advocate General (JAG) (1) Community Overview (a) The Judge Advocate Generals (JAG) Corps Direct Appointment Program (DA) permits attorneys to be appointed directly into the Navy Judge Advocate Generals Corps as lieutenants (junior grade) in the U.S. Naval Reserve for eight years and serve on active duty for at least the first three or four years of that obligation. This is a small program. (2) Age (a) At least 21 and less than 35. (b) Waiver for every month prior commission service. (3) Education (a) Graduate of ABA accredited law school. (4) Testing (a) Passed Bar Exam in one of the 50 states. (5) Training (a) ODS (5 wks) (b) Naval Justice School (9 wks) (c) Naval Legal Service Office Orientation (1 wk) (d) Ship Orientation (2 wks) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from reporting to 1st duty station. 45
  46. 46. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. b. JAG Student (1) Program Overview (a) The Judge Advocate Generals (JAG) Corps Student Program (SP) permits law students to receive a commission in the inactive Naval Reserve while attending law school. Upon graduation and successful completion of a bar examination, SP participants serve in the Navy Judge Advocate Generals Corps as lieutenants (junior grade) in the U.S. Naval Reserve. This is our largest source of attorneys and the best way to become a Navy JAG. (2) Age (same as JAG DA) (a) At least 21 and less than 35. (b) Waiver for every month prior commission service. (3) Education (a) Full-time student at ABA Law School with at least one year completed or graduate awaiting Bar admission. (b) Part-time or dual-degree students must be within 2 yrs of completion. (4) Testing (a) None (5) Training (same as JAG DA) (a) OIS (5 wks, if possible, done summer prior to 3rd yr, otherwise after Bar exam) (b) Naval Justice School (9 wks) (c) NLSO Orientation (1 wk) (d) Ship Orientation (2 wks (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs Active from reporting to 1st duty station. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. 46
  47. 47. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 c. Chaplain (1) Community Overview (a) Chaplain Corps officers are religious professionals in spiritual care. They work in collaboration with all Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard commands throughout the world to deliver religious ministry to active duty personnel and their families. The areas of responsibility include: i Navy ships at sea, home ported in the continental United States and overseas. ii Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard units and chapels at home and around the world. iii Navy hospitals near military bases. iv Service academies and military training schools. (2) Age (a) Must not have reached age 40 at time of commission. (b) Waivers on a case by case basis to meet the needs of the Navy. Age waiver boards for Chaplains will be announced by the Program Manager, and are currently very limited in number available. (3) Education (a) 120 semester hrs for undergrad degree, plus a graduate degree (72 grad. semester hrs; at least 36 of these hours must be in "religious/ministry" core areas); from accredited schools. (4) Testing (a) None (5) Training (a) Chaplain School (length of school varies depending on whether first assignment is with a Marine Corps or Navy command). (b) Active Duty applicants, with an initial assignment to a US Navy command, will complete approximately 80 days of Chaplain Basic Course curriculum. Applicants with an initial assignment to a US Marine Corps will complete an additional (approximate) 25 days of USMC orientation (CREST training). (6) Obligation 47
  48. 48. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) 3 yrs from date of initial Active Duty orders. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. d. Chaplain Candidate Program (1) Program Overview (a) This program is designed to expose seminary students to the diverse and demanding ministry of Navy chaplains serving sea service personnel in a variety of settings. Chaplain candidates wear the uniform and receive pay and benefits only while on annual training. i Active Duty - This program leads to a direct commission as a Naval Reserve officer on three years of active service. Chaplains on active duty may apply for an indefinite extension and a regular commission after selection and promotion to Lieutenant Commander. ii Reserve Duty - This program leads to a commission as an officer in the Naval Reserve and a commitment of two days each month for drills and two weeks of annual training. While remaining in their civilian careers, Naval Reserve chaplains also have the opportunity to serve their country and accumulate points toward retirement. Naval Reserve chaplains also may apply for temporary or full-time active duty assignments (2) Age (a) At least 21 and not older than 38 at time of graduation from seminary. (3) Education (a) 120 semester hrs for undergrad degree, plus enrolled full-time in an accredited graduate program. (4) Testing (a) None (5) Training (a) Chaplain School (approximately 45 days). (6) Obligation ACITVE (a) 3 yrs from date of initial Active Duty orders. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. 48
  49. 49. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (7) Obligation RESERVE (a) Total 8 yrs USNR Ready Reserve. (b) Not subject to recall or mobilization while in a 1945 status. (c) No annual or weekend drill obligations. (d) Annual on-the-job-training (OJT) periods, with pay, strongly encouraged. e. Nuclear Power School Instructor (1) Community Overview (a) Nuclear Power School Instructors are responsible for teaching future nuclear trained officers and enlisted personnel the theory and fundamentals behind the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waivers may be considered for those who would not exceed age 35 at commission. (3) Education (a) BA/BS/MS in preferred majors; Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry. (b) Within 2 ½ years of graduation (1yr - MS), with a minimum of: i 1 yr Calculus with B or higher ii 1 yr Calculus-based Physics with B or higher iii Calculus must be through differential and integral calculus of one real variable. Physics must cover the classic fundamentals of mechanics, magnetism, and electricity. iv "B" or better in all technical courses. (4) Testing – None (5) Training (a) ODS (5 wks) 49
  50. 50. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (b) NPS OJT (4 mo) (6) Obligation (a) 4 yrs from ODS graduation. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive. f. Naval Reactors Engineer (1) Community Overview (a) NR Headquarters consists of about 250 engineers, who technically manage the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. About 100 of these engineers are junior naval officers with engineering or technical degrees. This Headquarters group is responsible for all aspects of the Nuclear Propulsion Program including: i Advanced research and development in concepts, materials, design, and operation of nuclear propulsion plants. ii Training and qualification of nuclear propulsion plant operators. iii Reactor safety and radiological controls. iv Development of equipment, procedures, and specifications for naval nuclear propulsion plants. v Overseeing the acquisition, construction, testing, and operation of propulsion plants. vi Developing and implementing the operating, maintenance, and refueling procedures for these plants. vii Resolving emergent fleet technical issues. viii Decommissioning the nuclear propulsion plants when removed from service. (2) Age (a) At least 19 and less than 29 at time of commission. (b) Waivers may be considered for those who would not exceed age 35 at commission. (3) Education 50
  51. 51. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (a) BA/BS/MS in preferred majors: Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry. (b) Within 2 ½ years of graduation (1yr - MS), with a minimum of: i 1 yr Calculus with B or higher ii 1 yr Calculus-based Physics with B or higher iii Calculus must be through differential and integral calculus of one real variable. Physics must cover the classic fundamentals of mechanics, magnetism, and electricity. iv "B" or better in all technical courses. (c) Competitive GPA = 3.3+; top 10% of class. (4) Testing (a) None (5) Training (a) ODS (5 wks) (b) Department of Naval Reactors OJT (4-5 months) (c) Land-based prototype (2 wks) (d) Reactor Design Study at Bettis Reactor Engineer School (6 months) (6) Obligation (a) 5 yrs from OIS graduation. (b) Total of 8 yrs Active & Inactive.5. Summary & Review6. Application7. Evaluation a. CBT8. Assignment9. Back to Course Outline 51
  52. 52. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 OUTLINE SHEET 1.4 MEDICAL PROGRAM KNOWLEDGETerminal Objective:1.4.0 Identify Direct Accession and Collegiate programs; Program Authorizations and Program Managers.Enabling Objectives:1.4.1 Describe Active Duty Direct Accession Medical, Dental, Nurse and Medical Service Corps programs.1.4.2 Describe Active and Reserve Collegiate programs offered within the Medical, Dental, Nurse and Medical Service Corps.1.4.3 Explain Bonus Options and Payback Requirements for each medical program.1.4.4 Identify the purpose of Program Authorizations.1.4.5 Identify the role of Medical Program Managers (PM).Reference:1. Program Authorizations: 113 – 119; 130 – 1322. N34 Active Duty Medical Program Matrix3. Lesson Topic: Intro to Collegiates4. Information Sheet (I-2): Competitive Board ProfilesTopic Outline:1. Introduction2 Active Duty Direct Accession Medical Programs a Medical Corps Direct Accession (1) Fully licensed and specialized. Can also be ready to finish residency or be right out of Medical School. (2) Accession Bonuses vary by specialty, higher for Critical Wartime Skills (CWS). Health Professions Loan Repayment Program (HPLRP) available. (3) Obligation 3 years, 4 years if bonus or HPLRP is taken. b Dental Corps Direct Accession (1) Fully licensed and/or specialized. Can be right out of Dental School. 52
  53. 53. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (2) Accession Bonus is $75,000. HPLRP available. CWS bonus may be more. (3) Obligation 3 years, 4 years if bonus or HPLRP is taken. CWS bonuses may incur even more obligation. c Nurse Corps Direct Accession (1) Must have 4 year BSN degree and have passed license exam. (2) Accession Bonus options are $20,000 or $30,000. HPLRP is available dependent upon need for Navy Nurses. (3) Obligation is 3 years with or without the $20,000 bonus. 4 years with $30,000 or HPLRP. 5 years if $30,000 and HPLRP are taken. d Medical Service Corps Direct Accession. The MSC consists of 22 specialties. Accession bonuses vary year to year dependent on the needs of the Navy. Minimum payback for all MSC direct accession programs is 3 years. If bonus is available and taken payback is + 1 year in addition to minimum (3) for a total of 4 years. Same for HPLRP. If a bonus and HPLRP are available and taken together payback is + 2. Not all of these specialties are needed each fiscal year as some specialty communities are very small. (1) Aerospace Physiology (AP) (2) Aerospace Experimental Psychology (AEP) (3) Audiology (4) Biochemistry (BIOCHEM) (5) Clinical Psychology Workforce (CLINPSYCH) (a) Clinical Psychology Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USUHS) (b) Clinical Psychology INTERN (c) Clinical Psychology Post Doctoral Fellowship (6) Clinical Dietetics (7) Environmental Health (EHO) (8) Entomology (ENTO) (9) Health Care Administration (HCA) (10) Industrial Hygiene (IHO) (11) Medical Technology (MEDTECH) 53
  54. 54. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 (12) Microbiology (13) Occupational Therapy (OT) (14) Optometry (15) Pharmacy (PHARMD) (16) Physical Therapy (PT) (a) Physical Therapy Baylor Program (17) Physician Assistant (PA) (18) Physiology (19) Podiatry (20) Radiation Health (RHO) (21) Research Psychology (22) Social Work (SW)3 Collegiate Medical Programs. These are the same programs you were introduced to during Introduction to Collegiates. a Active Collegiate Programs (1) Health Services Collegiate Program (HSCP) provides opportunities to the following types of students. (a) Dental students i There are not many HSCP positions available to dental students, some years there may be none offered at all. (b) Medical Students (c) MSC i Only offered to certain specialties and can change year to year, even mid-year. (2) Benefits and payback. (a) All benefits and pay commensurate to all other active duty personnel with the exception of tuition assistance. (b) Payback is generally year for year. 54
  55. 55. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 b Reserve Collegiate Programs (1) Armed Forces Health Professional Scholarship Program (AFHPSP). This is a program identical to the Army and Air Force, thus why it’s called Armed Forces HPSP. It provides scholarships for the following types of students. (a) Medical Students (b) Dental Students (c) Physician Assistant Students (d) Optometry Students (e) Podiatry Students (f) Clinical Psychology Students (g) Nurse Corps (h) The above specialties may be authorized per program authorization to use the AFHPSP but this does not mean all of them do each year. It’s all dependent on funding and needs of the specific Corps. (i) There is a $20,000 signing bonus associated with this program. Whether it is offered to each of the 7 specialties above may change year to year. Currently it is only offered to Medical Students. Stipend is the same no matter the specialty, currently $2,060 per month, taxable. (j) Payback for all specialties is generally year for year + 1. (k) As with most accession bonuses, accepting the bonus incurs 1 more year of obligation IF not taken at the beginning of a 4 year program or currently in the first year of a 4 year program. For example, a medical student is waiting to begin or is currently in their first year of medical school and signs the AFHPSP contract accepting the bonus will not incur any further obligation. (2) Dental Student Program. This is a specific program offered only to Dental Students. (a) Sign on any time during dental school, but student decides whether to obligate at graduation. (b) Time in program earns time towards pay- this could result in $1000.00 or more per month if they obligate. (c) Upon graduations they have four options. i Option 1 –$75,000.00 sign on bonus; 55
  56. 56. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 ii Option 2 – HPLRP; iii Option 3 - $75,000 and HPLRP; iv Option 4 – do not obligate at all and return a civilian at graduation. (d) Payback is 3 years if no bonus or HPLRP taken. 4 years if bonus or HPLRP taken. 5 years if bonus and HPLRP taken. (e) This program only offers a guaranteed job. (3) Nurse Candidate Program (NCP). As the name implies this is specific to the Nurse Corps. (a) Offered to 3rd and 4th year Nursing Students. (b) A $10,000 accession bonus is broken into 2 payments. $5,000 at accession and $5,000 six months later. (c) A monthly taxable stipend of $1,000 is earned monthly. (d) Payback is tricky with this program. If a student accesses between 24 and 12 months from graduation they are obligated 5 years. If accessing within a year of graduation they are obligated 4 years. (e) For those students falling into the 4 year obligation it may be in the best interest for the student to apply for a direct accession. Ensure you have all goaling and bonus information up to date and that the student understands their options. (4) Financial Assistance Program (FAP). This program offers an annual grant and stipend to the following: (a) Medical (b) Dental (c) The grant for both is $45,000 and is paid on their anniversary date of accession. (d) Both also receive the same stipend allotted to the AFHPSP of $2,060 per month. (e) Payback is year for year + 1, or a minimum of 3 years, whichever is greater. For example, a medical school graduate is accepted to a 3 year residency and signs the Navy contract. At the completion of the residency the Doctor will owe 4 years. 3 years for the program plus 1 year. (f) Keep in mind that the Doctor, while in a military program, is attending a civilian residency. This means they will also be paid by the civilian residency.4 Program Authorizations (PA) 56
  57. 57. STUDENT GUIDE S-501-0007 a PA’s are written laws of basic eligibility requirements such as age limits and citizenship, and education requirements such as Grade Point Averages and professional test scores, for each different program the Navy has to offer. b It’s unrealistic to memorize every single PA but it is important to know where to find, view, and/or review a PA prior to beginning the “blueprinting” process with a Prospect. c PA’s are public information and can be found on the Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) website under “Publications” then click on “Directives.” d NRC Website address is: http://www.cnrc.navy.mil/5 Program Managers (PM) a PM’s reside at NRC Headquarters in Millington, TN. Their primary job is to accomplish annual goals assigned to them by the Director of Medical Accessions. b PM’s other duties involve screening your kits for accuracy and applicant eligibility in preparation for the professional review boards. c It is in your best interest to contact a PM if there is any question whether a prospect is qualified. Guessing in the recruiting business equals wasted time for you and more importantly, the prospect. It is highly stressed that you read the respective PA prior to calling a PM. d PM contact information can be found on the NRC website by selecting “Internal Links”, then “Recruiting Quarterdeck” (CAC Required), then “Departments”, then “N3”. Scroll down to N314; these are the PM’s for the programs discussed in this lesson.6 Summary & Review a None7 Assignment a Review N34 Program Matrix8 Testing a CBT9 ApplicationBack to Course Outline 57

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