REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES

BATAAN PENINSULA STATE UNIVERSITY

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
City of Balanga, 2100 Bata...
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The researchers who worked on the research “Disaster Risks and Hazard
Vulnerability of Coastal Communities...
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRELIMINARIES
Title Page
Acknowledgement
Table of Contents
List of Tables
List of Appendices
Abstract

P...
LIST OF FIGURES
Figures

Title

Page

1

Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Family Occupation

18

2

Liveliho...
18

Self-Protection in Terms of the Location of the House

35

19

Self-Protection in Terms of the Acceptance of Relocatio...
Disaster Risks and Hazard Vulnerability of Coastal Communities in Bataan: Basis

for Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation ...
by the LGUs regarding the Building Code during the construction of their houses. The LGU has
already conducted seminar abo...
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  1. 1. REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES BATAAN PENINSULA STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE City of Balanga, 2100 Bataan DISASTER RISKS AND HAZARD VULNERABILITY OF COASTAL COMMUNITIES IN BATAAN: BASIS FOR DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND MITIGATION PLAN (DPMP) (Terminal Report) Main Researcher LOURDES S. SANTOS, Ed. D. Co-Researchers ROLLIVER M. BACILES, Ed. D., CESO LEANDRO T. OLUBIA, MAEd JOB DIOSO PAGUIO, MHisto JAIME M. FORBES, MAEd Faculty Members, College of Education, BPSU-Balanga Campus BATAAN PENINSULA STATE UNIVERSITY Funding Agency i
  2. 2. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The researchers who worked on the research “Disaster Risks and Hazard Vulnerability of Coastal Communities in Bataan: Basis for Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Plan (DPMP)” gratefully acknowledge the following individuals and institutions for helping in the conduct of the study: Dr. Delfin O. Magpantay, our University President for giving me the opportunity to develop this research project and have this project realized; Dr. Gregorio J. Rodis, Vice-President for Research and Auxilalliary Services, Mrs. Arlene Ibanez, Director of Research and Development, Mrs. Wilma BanabanTumaliuan, the Associate Director for Research in BPSU-Balanga Campus and the RDO Staff for their divine assistance and help extended all throughout the undertaking of the research project; Dr. Rolliver M. Baciles, Dean of the College of Education, and CoEd faculty members for giving me moral support in making this research project accomplished; The Bachelor of Secondary Education major in Social Studies students and members of Social Science Society for their unconditional help in the gathering of data and visitation to the coastal communities; The local barangay officials and coastal families of Bagac namely Brgy. Paysawan, Binuangan and Quinawan and of Morong town namely Brgy. Poblacion, Mabayo and Sabang for the warm accommodation and participation to the study. The administrators and personnel of Advanced National Seismic System Catalogue, PHILVOCS, DOST, Mines and Geosciences Bureau, Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Manila Observatory for the helpful maps used by the researchers. To You and Almighty God in Heaven, for the strength, talent and wisdom bestowed upon us to make this project possible. Researchers ii
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS PRELIMINARIES Title Page Acknowledgement Table of Contents List of Tables List of Appendices Abstract Page i ii iii Iv v vi INTRODUCTION Rationale Statement of the Problem Related Literature Conceptual Framework 1 4 4 13 METHODOLOGY Method of Research Research Instruments 14 14 15 Procedures in Gathering Data DISCUSSIONS OF RESULTS AND FINDINGS Hazard Vulnerability of the Coastal Communities in Terms of Livelihood Strength and Resilience Hazard Vulnerability of the Coastal Communities in Terms of Well-Being and Baseline Status Hazard Vulnerability of the Coastal Communities in Terms of Self- Protection Hazard Vulnerability of the Coastal Communities in Terms of Social Protection and Governance Disaster Risk in the Coastal Communities in Terms of Flooding and Landslide Disaster Risk in the Coastal Communities in Terms of Volcanic Eruptions Disaster Risk in the Coastal Communities in Terms of Earthquake Disaster Risk in the Coastal Communities in Terms of Tsunami Initial Disaster Preparedness Plan of the Coastal Communities 18 31 34 38 41 47 49 54 57 CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION Summary of Findings Conclusion Recommendation 60 60 61 REFERENCES 62 APPENDICES Line Item Budget 65 66 Time Table of the Study iii
  4. 4. LIST OF FIGURES Figures Title Page 1 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Family Occupation 18 2 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Number of Family Members 20 3 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Type of Family 21 4 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Monthly Family Income 22 5 5 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Sufficiency of Monthly Income 23 6 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Presence of Livelihood Projects 24 7 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Means of Transportation 25 8 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Garbage Disposal System 26 9 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Human Waste Disposal System 27 10 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Drainage System 28 11 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Source of Water Supply 29 12 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of Source of Light Energy 30 13 Livelihood Strength and Resilience in Terms of the Composition of the Family Members According to Age 31 14 Well-Being and Baseline Status in Terms of the Type of Illness 32 15 Well-Being and Baseline Status in Terms of the Type of Disability 32 16 Well-Being and Baseline Status in Terms of the Number of Families with Medical Insurance 33 17 Self-Protection in Terms of the Type of the House 34 iv
  5. 5. 18 Self-Protection in Terms of the Location of the House 35 19 Self-Protection in Terms of the Acceptance of Relocation 36 20 Self-Protection in Terms of the Advice from the LGUs in the House Construction 37 21 Social Protection and Governance in Terms of the Seminar Conducted by the LGU on Natural Hazard 38 22 Social Protection and Governance in Terms of the Presence of LGU Committee to Assist during Hazardous Event 39 23 Social Protection and Governance in Terms of the Presence of Volunteer Group to Assist during Hazardous Event 40 v
  6. 6. Disaster Risks and Hazard Vulnerability of Coastal Communities in Bataan: Basis for Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Plan (DPMP) by Lourdes S. Santos, Ed. D.* oiugapeboj@yahoo.com Jaime M. Forbesa, Rolliver M. Baciles, Ed. D.b, Job D. Paguioc and Leandro T. Olubiad Co-Researchers *Corresponding Author *abcd Faculty Members, College of Education, Bataan Peninsula State University, Balanga City, Bataan, Philippines This descriptive research aimed to assess the hazard vulnerability and disaster risk of local coastal communities (barangay) of Bataan which will serve as basis in the creation of a Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Plan (DPMP). Specifically, this study aimed to identify the hazard vulnerability of the coastal communities along livelihood strength and resilience, well-being and baseline status, self-protection and social protection and governance. It also assessed the disaster risk in the coastal communities along flooding and landslides, volcanoes, earthquake and tsunami. Eventually, the results of the study will be used in designing Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Plan for the use of local communities focusing on disaster preparedness, risk reduction, emergency response and reconstruction and rehabilitation. The study used a social survey method, participatory risk assessment and action planning tools and refered to the maps provided by Advanced National Seismic System Catalogue, PHILVOCS, DOST, Mines and Geosciences Bureau, Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Manila Observatory. The study was conducted in 6 coastal barangays of Bagac and Morong, Bataan. A total of 213 respondents participated in the study. The researchers found out that most mothers have no occupation while the majority of the fathers are farmers. The average size of the family is 6 members. Most of the families are extended and earn less than 10,000 pesos a month. There are also inadequate income opportunities in the area. Burning is the main system of disposing the garbage and majority of the people use water sealed septic exclusive. The source of water supply is through shared faucet while most houses are already electrified. Since the area is coastal but surrounded by mountains on the other side, majority of the residents live along the coastline. In times of natural disasters, majority of the people are willing to relocate. However, they were not properly advised vi
  7. 7. by the LGUs regarding the Building Code during the construction of their houses. The LGU has already conducted seminar about natural hazard particularly on tsunami and typhoon. There is neither LGU Committee nor volunteer group to assist during hazardous event. In terms of disaster risk in the coastal communities, the communities along the coastline of Bagac and Morong are highly susceptible to flooding while those communities near the mountainsides are highly susceptible to landslides. There is a low risk of volcanic eruptions in the area as well as earthquake and earthquake-triggered landslides. There is a high potential of tsunami in the coastal communities of Bagac and Morong. In light of the findings, the researchers proposed that the coastal communities must be empowered financially by providing them adequate sources of means of livelihood to help them prepare for disasters and post-disaster conditions. Also, seminars regarding the risks of hazards and the vulnerability of the coastal communities must be conducted to inform them of the disasters that pose dangers to their lives and their properties. Likewise, disaster drills and practices must be taught to the coastal families not only to local officials so that they may be empowered in the face of disasters and natural hazards. Furthermore, equipment and facilities must be provided to the coastal communities like warning system, rubber boats and other necessary materials that are needed in pre and post disaster management. Finally, a comprehensive Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Plan (DPMP) must be written immediately in light of the findings made by the study. vii

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