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What do I see? Time to Pay       Attention    Crash Course in Creativity         Assignment #2
Your Task, Should You Choose To               Accept It…• Visit 6 stores or public places• Make a series of observations…•...
Hmmm…where to go?• I decided to use those stores or public spaces I  frequent…frequently….• The weekly errands involved in...
Location and Space• Those shops I frequent for errands can be  classified as “big box” or “warehouse” type  shops• Signage...
The “Big Box” Stores
Location and Space• However, the “hangout spots” are distinctly  different• They are all located in an historic part of to...
The “Hangout” Shops       This shop is within       the historic       building
Entrances• Box stores often had signs with “sales”, the doors  opened smoothly with sensors, or were hidden  behind anothe...
Internal Environment• The box stores all had the same type of “warehouse  feel”.   – Tall ceilings, metal frame shelving, ...
An example of the “Big Box” store
Internal Environment• In the “hangout” stores  – Every one was unique, and suited to it’s    environment     • The café wa...
The Inside of the “Hangout” Stores
• Staff numbers in “Hangout”  shops were smaller, and more  eclectic in age and gender• Security was more subdued,  mostly...
Customers• In 3 of the locations, the majority of  customers were women, alone, and in their  20-30’s  – Except for the ha...
• In the “box stores” everyone seemed to follow  the “up and down the aisle” pattern of  shopping, beginning at the front ...
• The “box shops” were all busy, and approximately  80% of customers bought goods• This was not the case in the “hangout” ...
So what did I learn?• The type of shop affects my shopping  pattern…or does the shop reflect my shopping  goal? I am goal ...
BUT…• The format of the box stores  doesn’t let me just get in and  out!  – I find myself wandering up    and down the ais...
Is This On Purpose?• So we buy more impulse items?  – (in my cynical, conspiracy theory mind)  – Could be…commonly used it...
What I’d love….• Is an interactive map of  the store   – Give me an app!   – Or let me pick it up from     the front of th...
In the future…• I think I will be more aware of how form and  function influence my shopping patterns!      By Andrewarchy...
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What do i see?

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Assignment #2 for Crash Course on Creativity

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What do i see?

  1. 1. What do I see? Time to Pay Attention Crash Course in Creativity Assignment #2
  2. 2. Your Task, Should You Choose To Accept It…• Visit 6 stores or public places• Make a series of observations…• By being open and receptive• Come up with new insights and opportunities!• Sounds easy? NOT! (apparently I can’t shop and observe at the same time…)
  3. 3. Hmmm…where to go?• I decided to use those stores or public spaces I frequent…frequently….• The weekly errands involved in running a family (grocery shopping, hardware store) or for work (stationary store)• Those shops close to areas I frequent (hang- out spots)
  4. 4. Location and Space• Those shops I frequent for errands can be classified as “big box” or “warehouse” type shops• Signage is large and easily visible from the road as you are driving• Inside is usually organized with metal shelving, in a large open space, with either polished concrete or laminate flooring
  5. 5. The “Big Box” Stores
  6. 6. Location and Space• However, the “hangout spots” are distinctly different• They are all located in an historic part of town, where the streets are narrow, traffic moves slow or there are more likely to be pedestrians• Signage is smaller, often more descriptive, and insides of shops are varied, as the buildings have been refurbished and preserved
  7. 7. The “Hangout” Shops This shop is within the historic building
  8. 8. Entrances• Box stores often had signs with “sales”, the doors opened smoothly with sensors, or were hidden behind another type of entrance – If you didn’t know what type of store it was, you would be hard pressed to tell from outside, certainly not enticing• The “hangout stores” all had their doors open, often had their products displayed outside or just inside display windows. Names were more descriptive
  9. 9. Internal Environment• The box stores all had the same type of “warehouse feel”. – Tall ceilings, metal frame shelving, bright flourescent lighting (not excruciatingly so), many many rows of shelving and quite a bit of product – No real distinctive smell – Often the requisite “muzak” in the background – Security mostly present in the front (in terms of sensors), but also with cameras – Cash registers at the front, staff in uniforms, mostly female mid-40’s (except for hardware store!)• Overall, you don’t really want to stay, and you feel like the product is “no frills”
  10. 10. An example of the “Big Box” store
  11. 11. Internal Environment• In the “hangout” stores – Every one was unique, and suited to it’s environment • The café was in an old warehouse, and the space was not altered significantly • The clothing shop was warm, with earthy tones on the floor, but same limestone walls • The bookshop had tall wooden shelves, and a squeaky wooden floor
  12. 12. The Inside of the “Hangout” Stores
  13. 13. • Staff numbers in “Hangout” shops were smaller, and more eclectic in age and gender• Security was more subdued, mostly in form of one or 2 cameras, and staff, except for the café!• Often the feeling is you feel like staying, but perhaps the merchandise is more expensive?
  14. 14. Customers• In 3 of the locations, the majority of customers were women, alone, and in their 20-30’s – Except for the hardware shop (mostly men), and the stationary shop and café (mix of men and women) – This could be a function of my attending the shops during the working week
  15. 15. • In the “box stores” everyone seemed to follow the “up and down the aisle” pattern of shopping, beginning at the front and moving through the whole shop – Especially true of grocery shopping, and the stationary store• In the “hangout shops” the pattern was more diverse once customers made it through the front door
  16. 16. • The “box shops” were all busy, and approximately 80% of customers bought goods• This was not the case in the “hangout” shops, besides the café (100%) the other 2 had more browsing types
  17. 17. So what did I learn?• The type of shop affects my shopping pattern…or does the shop reflect my shopping goal? I am goal oriented in the Box stores, but browsy in the Hangout Stores – Box stores: I know who/what they are (because of popular advertising), I go for a reason, I try to get in and out quickly, I have things to do!! – I go to the “hangout” stores to do that…hangout. I’m not rushing in them, and I don’t expect to be!
  18. 18. BUT…• The format of the box stores doesn’t let me just get in and out! – I find myself wandering up and down the aisles because I can’t easily find what I am looking for! And I noticed I wasn’t the only one… – Signage is small, and not really descriptive
  19. 19. Is This On Purpose?• So we buy more impulse items? – (in my cynical, conspiracy theory mind) – Could be…commonly used items/regularly purchased items up front, less commonly used items at back of store…..• OR• Could it be bad design? What would happen if we could get through the store more quickly?
  20. 20. What I’d love….• Is an interactive map of the store – Give me an app! – Or let me pick it up from the front of the store using a QR code! – Let me search it and find my items quickly!If only I could program…. By Das Photoimaginarium http://www.flickr.com/photos/dasfotoimaginarium/6761402235/ creative commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)
  21. 21. In the future…• I think I will be more aware of how form and function influence my shopping patterns! By Andrewarchy http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewarchy/2527200986/ Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

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