Recognizing and Cultivating Trust:     The Primary Driver of Network Impact              Katrina (Kate) Pugh              ...
INTEGRATED PLANNING            Advising nonprofits in:        www.synthesispartnership.com            • Strategy          ...
Affordable collaborative data             management in the cloud.A Service   Of:                        Sponsored by:
Today’s Speaker                                     Katrina (Kate) Pugh                                         President,...
Recognizing and Cultivating Trust       …The Primary Driver of Network Impact                                             ...
Agenda       • When we left off       • Define trust for today’s discussion       • Lack of trust is pervasive…       • …B...
When we left off:       What’s a “knowledge network”?                                                        A Knowledge N...
When we left off:       Knowledge network effectiveness framework       Design                                  Drivers   ...
When we left off:       How do knowledge network members behave?                                                Commonly ...
When we left off:       What you said      “Which of these behaviors is lagging in your knowledge network?” (Percent of   ...
Define trust for today’s discussion   Geoffrey Hosking (2010):                         Larry Prusak (2011):               ...
Lack of trust is pervasive…                 Bonus!                                               “Can’t trust those free- ...
…but, we’re wired for trust       Puzzles       • The “trust gene”* (Darwinian selection for social norming –         cult...
We can be trustworthy as individuals       1.       Act with discretion                                                   ...
How can we trust a network. Isn’t a       network an institution?       “Yes”                                        “No” ...
Networks’ “Trust Account” (3 Ps)       Proxies (declarations, certifications,       affiliations, endorsements,       rela...
.       How do you get there? (Recall: 8 general       knowledge network design dimensions)                8 Design Dimens...
Robust knowledge networks design trust in       8 times!         Proxies     1. Leaders’ change strategy is transparent, m...
Tale of two networks       Strive Network        – Shared theory of change, vision        – Published objectives, by secto...
Conclusions       • Employees, citizens, parents, congregations have lost         trust in management, institutions, and g...
Destination      Knowledge Networks are where necessity, creativity and                   belonging come together.© AlignC...
Some Reading •     Achieving Success Through Social Capital, By       Wayne Baker, University of Michigan       Management...
Kate Pugh, AlignConsulting and       Columbia University                                      • Kate has 17 years of consu...
#3 Expert/Learner balance example       • “As a social artist you really need find a way to get         people to recogniz...
#5 Operating Model example                                                                       Other                    ...
#7 Facilitation and Social Norm       Development example      The Guidelines for the Health and Business Roundtable Indon...
#7 Facilitation and Social Norm       Development example      Online Ground rules                 Integrity              ...
#8 Measurement Feedback and Incentives       Example        IBM 2009 Knowledge Network (CoP) Study       • We also had a c...
Find listings for our current season          of webinars and register at:            NonprofitWebinars.comA Service   Of:...
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Recognizing and Cultivating Trust: The Primary Driver of Network Impact

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The Knowledge Network (or Community of Practice) is a powerful organizational model for organizations to innovate, coordinate, build capacity, and translate ideas rapidly into action. On November 30, 2011 Kate Pugh of AlignConsulting and Columbia University led a Nonprofit Webinar on "knowledge networks." We introduced recent research funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and discussed the six behaviors of an enduring network: common objectives, collaborative behavior, working platform, cohesion, generous connectivity, and trust. More than half of all webinar participants were concerned about the levels of trust in their networks, and the resulting compromised collaboration. What builds trust in a network? What erodes it? What can we design into the network -- into its structures, relationships, measures -- to build trust and trustworthiness? We'll look at recent research on the mechanics and science of trust, and look at several case studies of networks where trust translates into volunteerism, innovation, and collaboration. We'll also revisit each of the 8 network design dimensions with a trust lens.

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Recognizing and Cultivating Trust: The Primary Driver of Network Impact

  1. 1. Recognizing and Cultivating Trust: The Primary Driver of Network Impact Katrina (Kate) Pugh March 28, 2012A Service Of: Sponsored by:
  2. 2. INTEGRATED PLANNING Advising nonprofits in: www.synthesispartnership.com • Strategy • Planning (617) 969-1881 • Organizational Development info@synthesispartnership.comA Service Of: Sponsored by:
  3. 3. Affordable collaborative data management in the cloud.A Service Of: Sponsored by:
  4. 4. Today’s Speaker Katrina (Kate) Pugh President, Faculty AlignConsulting, Columbia UniversityAssisting with chat questions: Hosting:April Hunt, Nonprofit Webinars Sam Frank, Synthesis PartnershipA Service Of: Sponsored by:
  5. 5. Recognizing and Cultivating Trust …The Primary Driver of Network Impact The Knowledge Network (or Community of Practice) is a powerful organizational model for organizations to Nonprofit Webinars innovate, coordinate, build capacity, and translate ideas rapidly into action. On November 30, 2011 we March 28, 2012 introduced recent network research funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and discussed the six behaviors of an enduring network: common objectives, collaborative behavior, working platform, cohesion, generous connectivity, and trust. More than half of all webinar participants were concerned about the levels of trust in their networks, and the resulting compromised collaboration. Kate Pugh AlignConsulting What builds trust in a network? What erodes it? What Author of Sharing Hidden Know-How can we design into the network -- into its structures, relationships, measures -- to build trust and www.alignconsultinginc.com trustworthiness? Well look at recent research on the katepugh@alum.mit.edu mechanics and science of trust, and look at several Twitter: @katrinapugh case studies of networks where trust translates into volunteerism, innovation, and collaboration. Well also v7 revisit each of the 8 network design dimensions with a trust lens.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 5
  6. 6. Agenda • When we left off • Define trust for today’s discussion • Lack of trust is pervasive… • …But we’re wired for trust • Isn’t a network an “institution”? • Networks’ “trust account” • How do you get there? • Tale of two networks • Conclusion© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 6
  7. 7. When we left off: What’s a “knowledge network”? A Knowledge Network (also called a “Community of Practice”) is a gathering of individuals motivated by the desire to cross organizational boundaries, to relate to one another, and to build a body of actionable knowledge through coordination and collaboration.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 7
  8. 8. When we left off: Knowledge network effectiveness framework Design Drivers Behavior Impacts What levers What What tone and What are the do we pull as dynamics behaviors do impacts? we influence come into we see? 1. Learning/Innovation 2. translation/adaptation the network? play? 3. coordination 4. practitioner support© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 8
  9. 9. When we left off: How do knowledge network members behave?  Commonly agreed goals and objectives  Collaboration (“self-sacrifice”)  Cohesiveness  Connectivity (“networked” beyond)  Using a working platform  Trust© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 9
  10. 10. When we left off: What you said “Which of these behaviors is lagging in your knowledge network?” (Percent of respondents who named each behavior) 0.6 53% 50% 0.5 44% 0.4 38% 0.3 28% 0.2 0.1 0 Commonly Collaboration Cohesiveness Connectivity Using a agreed goals and trust (“networked” working and objectives beyond the KN) platform Source: Nonprofit Webinar 11/20/11 (32 respondents) http://nonprofitwebinars.com/webinars/11302011-beyond- partnerships-tapping-into-the-agility-of-knowledge-networks-and-communities/© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 10
  11. 11. Define trust for today’s discussion Geoffrey Hosking (2010): Larry Prusak (2011): Steven Covey (2012) • “Attachment to a person, • “Trust is • “Trust is confidence” or collective of Anticipatory specific • “Trust includes persons, based on the reciprocity” character and well-founded but not • “Trust is the new gold. competencies.” certain expectation that Equally valuable, but he/she/they will act for • “Your trustworthi- for too many my good.” ness is a factor of companies and too my analysis and my • “The expectation, based many leaders not attitude.” on good but less than nearly so obviously perfect evidence, that worth the effort.” events will turn out in a way not harmful to me.Hosking, Trust: Money, Markets, and Society, Seagull Books, Calcutta; Prusak, “The one thing that makes collaboration work,” HBRBlog, July 5, 2011. Covey, Smart Trust: Creating Prosperity, Energy and Joy in a Low-Trust World, Simon and Schuster, NY.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 11
  12. 12. Lack of trust is pervasive… Bonus! “Can’t trust those free- riders” “Can’t trust those institutions” “Can’t trust those (Result: scrutinize the (Result: Arab spring, Greek bosses” safety net) demonstrations, Occupy (Result: trust- movement, Tea Party, Dodd erosion favors Frank regulations) layoffs over wage reductions)© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 12
  13. 13. …but, we’re wired for trust Puzzles • The “trust gene”* (Darwinian selection for social norming – culture and genetics intertwined) • General reciprocity (sharing when specific individual’s reciprocity unlikely, e.g., Linux, Innocentive) • Sacrificing when reward from trusting is separated in space and time (fraternity, social net) • Markets (without trust markets “stick,” e.g., in soviet union) *Boyd and Richardson, “Gene-Culture coevolution,” (ongoing research)© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 13
  14. 14. We can be trustworthy as individuals 1. Act with discretion  Consistency 2. Match words and deeds  Integrity 3. Communicate often and well  Transparency  Curiosity 4. Establish shared vision, language  Accountability 5. Highlight knowledge boundaries 6. Know when to step out of your role 7. Give away something of value 8. Help people refine unclear ideas 9. Make decisions fair and transparent 10. Hold people accountable for trustworthy behavior Source: Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, The Hidden Power of Social Networks: Understanding How Work Really Gets Done in Organizations, 2007.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 14
  15. 15. How can we trust a network. Isn’t a network an institution? “Yes” “No” – Big – Diverse – Structured (some) – Decentralized – Rubs elbows with – All about practice, not institutions power – Image/optics matter – Bound by social ties© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 15
  16. 16. Networks’ “Trust Account” (3 Ps) Proxies (declarations, certifications, affiliations, endorsements, relationships) Persistence (charters, ground rules, schedules, that signal trustworthiness)  Consistency  Integrity  Transparency Performance (Experience over time)  Curiosity  Accountability© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 16
  17. 17. . How do you get there? (Recall: 8 general knowledge network design dimensions) 8 Design Dimensions for Knowledge Networks Strategic 1. Leaders’ theory of change 2. Objectives/Outcomes/Purpose 3. Role of “expertise” and experimental learning (Expert/Learner balance) 4. Inclusion/Participation Structural 5. Operating model 6. Convening structures and infrastructures 7. Facilitation and social norm development Tactical 8. Measurement, feedback and incentives© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 17
  18. 18. Robust knowledge networks design trust in 8 times! Proxies 1. Leaders’ change strategy is transparent, modeled 2. Shared objectives, at the right level. Asymmetries in capacity, needs, etc., are discussed 3. Safe to be a learner, safe to share one’s convictions 4. Participation is well defined, and trustworthiness is part of the inclusion Persistence 5. Operation, decision-making processes and relationships are clearly defined, but flexible 6. Appropriate convening structures (people are showing up, using the platform) 7. Facilitation is focused on building real-time experience of trust Performance 8. There is follow-through, measurement, recognition© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 18
  19. 19. Tale of two networks Strive Network – Shared theory of change, vision – Published objectives, by sector – Efforts to include all stakeholders, incl. donors – Operating model is transparent Museum Collaborative – Asymmetry of capabilities – Convene with mtgs, platforms, not addressed gatherings, communications – Assumed shared vision – Metrics routine, published – Charismatic leader – Resistance to focus on the operating model (how we’ll get this done) – Governance model not mapped to capabilities© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 19
  20. 20. Conclusions • Employees, citizens, parents, congregations have lost trust in management, institutions, and government • Yet, we crave trustworthiness and trusting relationships in order to live productive, healthy lives, especially with “info-glut.” • There are individual trust strategies (Consistency, Integrity, Transparency, Curiosity, Accountability), but networks require trust transparency • Design for trust in Networks (proxies, persistence), measure performance publically and reinvest in trust© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 20
  21. 21. Destination Knowledge Networks are where necessity, creativity and belonging come together.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 21
  22. 22. Some Reading • Achieving Success Through Social Capital, By Wayne Baker, University of Michigan Management Series, Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2000. • The Hidden Power of Social Networks: Understanding How Work Really Gets Done in Organizations, by Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004 • Sharing Hidden Know-How by Katrina Pugh, Jossey-Bass, April 2011 • Sustainable Communities: Top 10 CSFs for Keeping the Faith, by Katrina Pugh IBM NASA Ask Magazine Synch.rono.us Blog, July 19, 2010 NASA Ask Magazine • Jamming with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement “ by Katrina Pugh and Jo Ann Endo, NASA Ask Magazine, Winter, 2011)© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 22
  23. 23. Kate Pugh, AlignConsulting and Columbia University • Kate has 17 years of consulting and seven years of industry experience. She held leadership positions with Intel Corporation, JPMorgan, and Fidelity. She is on the faculty of Columbia University’s Information and Knowledge Strategy Masters program, and is author of Sharing Hidden Know-How (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2011). • Kate has helped launch and/or run over 20 knowledge networks (communities of practice), including Intel’s award-winning Enterprise Architects’ community. • Sample clients include Cubist Pharmaceuticals, Fidelity Investments, The Gates Foundation, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Medtronic, Mitokine Bioscience, Project Management Institute, and The World Bank. Kate is on the Board of Knowledge Mgt. Institute Canada. • Kate has an MS/MBA from MIT Sloan, a BA in Economics from Williams College, www.alignconsultinginc.com and certificates in Dialogue, Facilitation, Mediation, Project Mgt., and LEAN Six katepugh@alum.mit.edu Sigma. Twitter: @katrinapugh • Kate has articles in Harvard Business Review, NASA Ask Magazine, Reuters Great Debate, Ivey Business Journal, and the Journal of Digital Media Management.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 23
  24. 24. #3 Expert/Learner balance example • “As a social artist you really need find a way to get people to recognize the learning partner in others. Self-design helps you to focus on the practice.” Beverly Trayner, International Social Learning Strategist, Columbia University Information and Knowledge Strategy Masters Program, Interview, 11/2/11© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 24
  25. 25. #5 Operating Model example Other Other Funding Other Funding Knowledge Network Organization Funding Organization Core Team Organization KN Discussion Group KN Manager Working Working Group Working Group Group© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 25
  26. 26. #7 Facilitation and Social Norm Development example The Guidelines for the Health and Business Roundtable Indonesia Based on Human Rights and Business Roundtable, The Fund for Peace (1997):  State the goal of the dialogue shared by participants.  State the objective of the dialogue.  Highlight the importance of guidelines for ensuring an atmosphere of sustained dialogue (share information and build the relationships needed to meet the shared goal and objective).  Include confidentiality (not secrecy) as a key component (e.g., no attribution to individuals or their organizations)  Guidelines for meeting notes, formal presentations will be handled (e.g., confidentiality, length, distribution permissions)  Dialogue is meant for sharing information to build good practices and share lessons learned, not promotion or public relations. (No representatives of the media) Source: Company-Community Partnerships for Health Worldwide© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 26
  27. 27. #7 Facilitation and Social Norm Development example Online Ground rules Integrity Inclusion Courtesy Translation Source: Columbia University Information and Knowledge Strategy Masters Program, 2011© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 27
  28. 28. #8 Measurement Feedback and Incentives Example IBM 2009 Knowledge Network (CoP) Study • We also had a community business impact study that focused on the value that active members received from the community… • Members who get a lot of value from their community also are more satisfied with their jobs, and more of them say their work gives them a feeling of personal accomplishment. In fact, the delta between the community members in the business impact study and the overall results for the BU sponsoring the community was 27 percentage points. This was pretty eye-popping to executives. 11/11/09, Alice Dunlap, abdunla@us.ibm.com in SIKM Leaders community discussion.© AlignConsulting www.alignconsultinginc.com 28
  29. 29. Find listings for our current season of webinars and register at: NonprofitWebinars.comA Service Of: Sponsored by:

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