Website conversion optimisation

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Nomensa's CEO Simon Norris and Merlin's Digital marketing manager, Deniz Hassan presents 'website conversion optimisation' at UX4NonProfit on 27th June 2012

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  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing? (Iyengar and Lepper, 2000).\n\nChoice Overload is a cognitive bias\n\nSelection vs Purchase\n\nLimited-choice condition (260p) 60% (145 ppl) stopped > 3% (4 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £8.76\nExtended-choice condition (242p) 40% (104 ppl) stopped > 30% (31 ppl) purchased £2.19 = £67.89\n\nDifference 775% increase in LCC vs EXC\n\nMotivation for selection - extended choice condition\n\nMotivation for purchasing - limited choice selection\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
  • Iceberg Model of meaning\n\nSurface and deeper meaning\n\nAnnabelle story.\n
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  • This is not just about getting people engaged with the charity in the short-term to make a donation, but also about building a longer term relationship.\n\nYou want eventually to turn people into supporters, fundraisers, members and perhaps even to be remembered in their will. \n
  • When we can identify a specific cause this typically leads to greater engagement.\n\nWe should avoid overwhelming people or making them feel futile.\n\nWe know that people do not feel engaged to help a crowd. Even the pictures used on a site can affect this, with pictures of individuals being the most effective - adding even a single extra person can diminish engagement. \n\nFocus in on individuals in case studies, messages, etc. \n
  • When we can identify a specific cause this typically leads to greater engagement.\n\nWe should avoid overwhelming people or making them feel futile.\n\nWe know that people do not feel engaged to help a crowd. Even the pictures used on a site can affect this, with pictures of individuals being the most effective - adding even a single extra person can diminish engagement. \n\nFocus in on individuals in case studies, messages, etc. \n
  • When we can identify a specific cause this typically leads to greater engagement.\n\nWe should avoid overwhelming people or making them feel futile.\n\nWe know that people do not feel engaged to help a crowd. Even the pictures used on a site can affect this, with pictures of individuals being the most effective - adding even a single extra person can diminish engagement. \n\nFocus in on individuals in case studies, messages, etc. \n
  • Evoke empathy, not guilt!\n\nProvide the facts and let people make their own conclusions.\n
  • Evoke empathy, not guilt!\n\nProvide the facts and let people make their own conclusions.\n
  • Evoke empathy, not guilt!\n\nProvide the facts and let people make their own conclusions.\n
  • Make it matter to the donor (person)!\n\n“It could have been me” can be a very powerful motivator and triggers ‘empathy’.\n\nMake sure people can relate to the cause. Geographic proximity is one of the strongest triggers, but if you have an overseas cause, make sure that it is expressed in terms that are meaningful. \n
  • Make it matter to the donor (person)!\n\n“It could have been me” can be a very powerful motivator and triggers ‘empathy’.\n\nMake sure people can relate to the cause. Geographic proximity is one of the strongest triggers, but if you have an overseas cause, make sure that it is expressed in terms that are meaningful. \n
  • Reciprocity is more than a word it is a fundamental social glue. We need to be able to appeal to a person’s sense of reciprocity.\n\nGive something in return for the donation. Even a very small gift can increase the number and value of donations. However, this generally works best before the donation is given. However, online donations may be less appropriate but careful research would reveal the emotional triggers. \n\nThere are some specific cases though, such as where people are making a donation to adopt an animal (for example) and then receive an adoption pack. \n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
  • Use meaningful and achievable targets that people understand.\n\nProvide people with data they can relate to (e.g. 72 tigers saved this month).\n\nAvoid using large figures (e.g. £1,897,435 raised so far) because it does not mean very much, and also people may feel that their £10 donation will not make a difference. \n\nAgain, it’s all about making it meaningful and something people can relate with so they can ‘make a difference’.\n
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  • Avoid commanding and complex language.\n\nLet people make their own decisions. If they’ve decided to donate, they’re more likely to see it through. If they feel coerced, they’re more likely to give up at the first opportunity. \n\nAppeal to a sense of fairness!\n
  • Establish trust.\n\nBe open and clear about where the money goes.\n\nUse charity “badges” and trust symbols where appropriate.\n
  • Establish trust.\n\nBe open and clear about where the money goes.\n\nUse charity “badges” and trust symbols where appropriate.\n
  • Establish trust.\n\nBe open and clear about where the money goes.\n\nUse charity “badges” and trust symbols where appropriate.\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
  • Our own research has shown that how much a donation is worth (critical) can directly affect what people are willing to donate.\n\nIt is important to emphasise that even a small donation helps.\n\nIt is important to provide some larger numbers as well to encourage the big donations!\n
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  • Website conversion optimisation

    1. 1. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    2. 2. WHY should we incorporate insights about psychology to drive design?Wednesday, 11 July 12
    3. 3. So, what can psychology teach us about how we make decisions?Wednesday, 11 July 12
    4. 4. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    5. 5. 40% stopped 60% stoppedWednesday, 11 July 12
    6. 6. 775% INCREASE 40% stopped 60% stopped 30% purchased 3% purchasedWednesday, 11 July 12
    7. 7. Surface Cognitive Factors Thinking, Reasoning, Decision- Meaning making, Logic, Computation, Strategy, Attention, Perception Deeper Emotional Factors Surprise, Anger, Happiness Fear, Love, Meaning Acceptance, Feeling, Expectation, Disgust, SorrowWednesday, 11 July 12
    8. 8. The online donation journey t d or ge ge ar pp ga w ud Re Su En N Content Messaging Straightforward Thank people Button design form design for their Features & Placement Features to consideration build trust and confidenceWednesday, 11 July 12
    9. 9. BUILDING emotional ENGAGEMENTWednesday, 11 July 12
    10. 10. Building emotional engagementWednesday, 11 July 12
    11. 11. Building emotional engagement £20 will help save About 1440 acres are cut down every day. That’s about 700 football pitches. 1000 trees! A NI C! PWednesday, 11 July 12
    12. 12. Building emotional engagement It could have been me...Wednesday, 11 July 12
    13. 13. Building emotional engagementWednesday, 11 July 12
    14. 14. Building emotional engagement 69 Tigers saved! = 3 TigersWednesday, 11 July 12
    15. 15. TURNING engagement into DONATIONWednesday, 11 July 12
    16. 16. Turning engagement into donationsWednesday, 11 July 12
    17. 17. Turning engagement into donations 80% will go directly to the charityWednesday, 11 July 12
    18. 18. Turning engagement into donations t! an rt po £20 im ill St will help save £10 will help save 1000 trees! £5save 500 trees! will help 250 trees!Wednesday, 11 July 12
    19. 19. Turning engagement into donationsWednesday, 11 July 12
    20. 20. Turning engagement into donationsWednesday, 11 July 12
    21. 21. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    22. 22. Internally we think: The website exists to give as much information about Merlin to the outside world as possible. We want people to leave knowing exactly what our mission and policies are and what great things we have been doing recently. Externally donors think: What problems is Merlin solving and if I’m moved, how can I help?Wednesday, 11 July 12
    23. 23. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    24. 24. the first 10 seconds are critical!Wednesday, 11 July 12
    25. 25. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    26. 26. The 2 roads to optimisation • Bespoke usability testing • Learn from othersWednesday, 11 July 12
    27. 27. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    28. 28. 98.7% UPLIFTWednesday, 11 July 12
    29. 29. Wednesday, 11 July 12
    30. 30. 9% UPLIFTWednesday, 11 July 12
    31. 31. 162% 22% DECREASE UPLIFT bounce rateWednesday, 11 July 12
    32. 32. • Simon@nomensa.com • deniz.hassan@merlin.org.uk • @simon_norris • www.merlin.org.uk • www.nomensa.com • @MerlinUK • @we_are_nomensaWednesday, 11 July 12

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