Final Winter 2012 Survey Report

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Final report on data from the Winter 2012 Survey of staffing and recruiting managers in Greater Cincinnati. Survey conducted by the Staffing & Recruiting Committee of the Greater Cincinnati Human Resources Association. Survey questions, analysis and report done by Joy Lovejoy, ABC, program manager-surveys for the Staffing & Recruiting Committee.

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Final Winter 2012 Survey Report

  1. 1. Staffing & Recruiting Committee CWinter 2012 Survey ReportWinter 2012 Survey ReportTalent Acquisition Practices Greater CincinnatiTalent Acquisition Practices inin Greater Cincinnati About this Survey The Staffing & Recruiting A comparison of the data Committee of the Greater returned on the Winter 2012 Table of Contents Page Cincinnati Human Resources Survey to the same questionsAbout this Survey 1 Association (GCHRA) surveys asked in the Summer 2011 Page area hiring managers twice survey showed consistency inFirst Quarter 2012 Hiring each year in order to track the data between the twoAbout this Survey 1Practices 2 staffing practices among area surveys.First Quarter 2012 Hiring companies and organizations. Qualifications Sought in Respondents completed a totalPractices 2 Candidates 4 The Winter 2012 Survey was of 38 questions designed to Qualifications Sought in conducted between late- measure practices in four Employee Turnover 6 Candidates 4 January and mid-February areas:Recruiting Practices 7 2012. Employee Turnover 6  Hiring practices in the Some Positions Difficult A total of 135 hiring manag- first quarter (January,Recruiting Practices 7 to Fill 7 ers responded to the online February and March) of Some Positions Difficult survey, representing 97 com- 2012 Compensation 9 to Fill 7 panies or organizations in Social Media and Candidate  Recruiting practices Compensation 9 Greater Cincinnati. The re- Sourcing Method 10 turn rate for the companies  Demographics of survey Social Media and Candidate or organizations was 12.7 participants and theirDemographics 11 Sourcing Method 10 percent. companies or organiza- Industry Groups 11 tionsDemographics 11 This rate is not strong enough Location, Location, Location 12 to say definitively that the  The outlook for hiring Industry Groups 11 data is representative of the practices in the second Employees in Organizations Location, Location, Location 12 talent acquisition community. quarter (April, May and or Companies 12 The survey data, however, June) of 2012 Employees in OrganizationsOutlook for Second Quarter may be taken as guidance to or Companies 122012 13 the state of talent acquisitionOutlook for Second Quarter in Greater Cincinnati at the2012 13 time the survey was con- ducted in late-January and mid-February 2012. 1
  2. 2. First Quarter 2012 Hiring PracticesHiring during the first quarter percent of respondents respondents for the 2011(January, February and March) reported hiring only for new survey. Among the reasonsof 2012 was up slightly compared positions. for not hiring cited by theto the 3rd quarter of 2011. That 2012 respondents were: Hiring data from the twowas one of the findings among surveys also showed:  Hiring freeze – 42.9respondents to the Winter 2012 percent compared toSurvey.  Hiring only to fill vacan- 50.0 percent in 2011 cies in existing positionsThe 2012 survey found that 114 was reported by 28.3  Rightsizing – 28.5respondents, representing 84.4 percent of the 2012 percent compared to 35percent of the total respondents, respondents and 22.7 percent in 2011reported their company or or- percent of respondents  Restructuring – 19.0ganization was hiring in the first to the 2011 survey percent compared toquarter. When the same ques-tion was asked of respondents in  Hiring to fill vacancies in 5.0 percent in 2011the 2011 survey, conducted last both existing positions  Downsizing – 9.5July, 82.7 percent of the respon- and hiring for new percent compared todents reported hiring by their positions was reported 10.0 percent in 2011companies or organizations. by 61.6 percent of respondents in 2012 and Chart 1 displays the types ofData from the 2012 survey positions respondents reported 76.1 percent ofshowed that 10.1 percent of the as filled for their companies/ respondents in 2011respondents reported hiring for organizations during the firstnew positions only. Newly The 2012 survey found that quarter of 2012.created positions are generally 15.5 percent of respondentsseen as indicators of a growing reported that their company oreconomy. The July 2011 organization was not hiring,survey data showed just 1.1 compared to 15.2 percent of Chart 1: Positions Filled in 1st Qtr. 2012 by Percent of Total Responses for Each Position (Respondents Could Select More than One Position Level) 23.5 20.4 22.4 31.6 64.3 51.0 49.0 44.9 44.9 Executive Director Supervisor/Manager Exempt - Technical Exempt - Non-technical Non-exempt hourly - Technical Non-exempt hourly-Non-Techical Non-exempt salaried - Technical Non exempt salaried - Non-Technical 2
  3. 3. Survey participants were asked about hiring practices for contract/temporary employees during the first quarter of 2012. Chart 2 displays data on the hiring status for contract/temporary workers. Chart 2: Hiring Status for Contract/Temporary Employees* - 1st Qtr. 2012 Displayed As Percentage of Yes or No Responses (*defined as individuals w ho are NOT on com pany/organizations payroll and NOT benefits eligible) Yes No 100 90Percentage of Responses 80 70 64.7 61.7 61.6 60 81.5 74.4 50 40 30 20 35.3 38.3 38.4 10 18.5 25.6 0 HIRING ADDING REPLACING HIRING Currently NOT HIRING contractors/tem porary contractors/tem porary contractors/tem porary contract/tem porary Contract/Tem porary em ployees to fill w hat em ployees to fill new em ployees to fill em ployees to Em ployees w ere form erly contracting/tem porary existing eventually fill a organizational/com pany jobs contracting/tem porary com pany position jobs jobs Hiring Status Chart 3 shows the types of positions for which contract/temporary employees were hired during the first quarter of 2012. Chart 3: Positions Filled for Contract/Temporary Employees in 1st Qtr. 2012 by Percent of Total Responses for Each Position (Respondents Could Select More than One Position Level) 9.4 0 5.7 3.8 3.8 26.4 Executive 56.6 Director 20.8 Supervisor/Manager Exem pt - Technical Exem pt - Non-technical Non-exem pt hourly - Technical Non-exem pt hourly-Non-Techical 39.6 Non-exem pt salaried - Technical Non exem pt salaried - Non-Technical 3
  4. 4. Qualifications Sought in CandidatesSurvey participants were asked about the educational and work ex-perience qualifications sought for exempt employee positions, non- Exempt employees areexempt employee positions and hourly employee positions. those defined by the Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA) asBased upon the top response for each of the three types of workers, being exempt from the FLSA’sthese are the most sought after candidates for each type of minimum wage and overtimeposition: requirements.  Candidates who are college graduates with bachelor-level de- Non-exempt employees are grees and have two years through five years of experience those who are subject to the are the most sought after for exempt employee positions. FLSA’s minimum wage and  Candidates who are high school graduates or GED recipients overtime requirements. Non- and have two years through five years of experience are the exempt employees must re- most sought after for non-exempt employee positions. ceive the higher of either the federal or state minimum  Candidates who are high school graduates or GED recipients wage and must be paid at the with less than two years experience are the most sought af- rate of one and a half times ter for hourly employee positions. their regular pay rate for eachChart 4 shows the educational qualifications and Chart 5 on hour worked above 40 hours apage 5 displays the work experience cited by respondents for the week.three types of candidate classifications. Hourly employees are paid aA poll conducted by the Society of Human Resource Management set amount for each hour(SHRM) conducted in October 2010 found that 71 percent of compa- worked and must be paid thenies that provided training on diversity issues. In the same poll, 84 higher of either the federal orpercent of companies reported that their diversity efforts were very state minimum wage. Over-effective or effective. time pay is required if they work more than 40 hours aThe Winter 2012 Survey asked Greater Cincinnati hiring managers week.about the diversity qualifications sought in job candidates.Chart 6 on page 5 displays the results for that question. Chart 4: Educational Qualifications Sought by Candidate Classification Displayed as Response Percentage for Each Classification w ithin Educational Qualification (Respondents Could Select More than One Educational Level per Candidate Classification) Exem pt Classification Non-Exem pt Classification Hourly Classification 100.0 91.7 88.6 Percentage of Total Responses 90.0 81.1 80.0 70.0 60.0 49.5 50.0 43.2 39.8 40.0 34.4 32.6 33.3 30.7 27.1 30.0 20.8 19.3 20.0 11.5 9.4 12.5 10.0 2.11.1 0.0 H i g h sc h o o l P r o f e ssi o n a l Te c hni c a l or C ol l e ge U nde r gr a dua t e C ol l e ge Gr a d u a t e P o st g r a d u a t e P o st g r a d u a t e gr a dua t e s or Cer t if icat e c a r e e r c ol l e ge g r a d u a t e s wi t h i n t e r n sh i p s g r a d u a t e s wi t h i n t e r n sh i p s de gr e e s de gr e e s ( J . D . , GED r e c i p i e n t s P r ogr a ms f r om gr a dua t e s B a c he l or s M a st e r s ( M a st e r , J . D . , P h. D . , M . D . ) a c c r e di t e d de gr e e s de gr e e s P h. D . , M . D . ) i n st i t u t i o n s Educational Qualification 4
  5. 5. Chart 5: Work Experience Sought in Candidates by Classification Displayed as Response Percentage for Each Classification Within the Work Experience (Respondents Could Select More than One Work Experience per Candidate Classification) Exem pt Classification Non-Exem pt Classification Hourly Classification 90.0 82.0 81.7 80.0 76.6 69.1Percentage of Total Responses 70.0 60.7 60.0 57.0 50.0 40.0 30.0 24.7 21.3 19.4 19.1 20.0 17.0 18.0 16.1 16.0 15.7 10.0 0.0 Those w ith less than Those w ith 2 to 5 Those w ith 6 to10 Those w ith 11 to 15 Those w ith 15+ years 2 years experience years experience years experience years experience experience Work Experience Chart 6: Diversity Qualifications Sought in Candidates by Percent of Total Responses for Each Qualification (Respondents Could Select More than One Diversity Qualification) Qualification: Ethnicity Gender Disabled Veterans 79.2 90.9 58.4 77.9 5
  6. 6. Employee Turnover Employee turnover represents a significant cost to a company and organization. The Winter 2012 Survey asked participants to provide the percentage of turnover experienced in 2011 for exempt, non-exempt and hourly workers who were on the company or organizational payroll and eligible for benefits. The turnover results are presented in Chart 7. Chart 7: Employee Turnover in 2011 by Classification Displayed as Response Percentage for Each Classification within a Turnover Range Exem pt Classification Non-Exem pt Classification Hourly Classification 45.0 40.0 38.5 34.7 34.6 35.0Percentage of Total Respondents 29.2 30.0 27.6 25.0 21.9 19.8 20.0 15.3 15.0 12.5 10.2 10.0 8.3 7.3 6.3 5.1 4.8 5.2 5.0 3.8 3.8 3.1 3.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.01.0 0.0 0% - 4.9% 5% - 9.9% 10% - 14.9% 15% - 19.9% 20% - 24.9% 25% - 39.9 % 40% - 59.9 % 60% - 79.9% 80% - 99.9% Greater Turnover Ranges (Expressed in Percentages) than 100% 6
  7. 7. Recruiting PracticesThis section discusses the findings from survey questions that asked about three specific recruitingpractices: compensation, social media usage and candidate sourcing methods.Some Positions Are Difficult to Fill Table A Typical Job PositionsIt has been widely reported Reported as Being Difficult tothat hiring companies andorganizations are experiencing Fillmore difficulty than expected infilling certain positions. Analyst, Accounting, Audit Senior AssociatesA survey conducted by Right and Managers, Finance, Branch Managers, As-Management, a division of sistant/Customer Service Managers, GeneralManpower Group, in November Business Manager, Sales Executives, Sales Representa-and December 2011 found that tive, Entry Level Sales Trainee, Call CenterU.S. employers reported more Sales, Mortgage Processor, Project Managersdifficulty in filling key positionsthan in 2010. In Greater Senior Application Developers, Data Modeler,Cincinnati, 53.1 percent of Programmers, System Analyst, Flash Designer/respondents to the 2012 survey Developer, Web Developer, Network Adminis-reported difficulties filling Computer/IT trator, Technology Services, IT contract posi-certain positions. tionsTable A presents the typicalpositions reported by survey Home Managers, Administrators, Dental Man-participants as being difficult to agers, Medical Assistants and Receptionists,fill during the first quarter Healthcare Direct Care/Caregivers, State Tested Nursing2012. Aides, Therapists, RN, Physicians, ObstetriciansAmong the reasons cited by2012 survey respondents fordifficulty in filling certain Highly Niched Scientific and Technical Posi-positions: tions; Chemistry Laboratory Manager; Microbi- ology Laboratory Manager; Mechanical and Process Engineers; Machine Operators; CNC  Candidates don’t possess Technical/ Programmers; Skilled Trades from Tool & Die the right work experi- Engineering/ to Maintenance; Narrow Web Flexographic ence (64.6 percent) Manufacturing Press Operators; Manufacturing Trainees;  Candidates don’t possess Maintenance Technician with Electrical Skills, the right skills Hourly Factory Workers (54.2 percent)  Candidates don’t possess Interior Designer, General Warehouse Associ- the right educational/ ates, Day Care Providers, Pre-K Head Start training background Other Teacher (31.2%)  Can’t find candidates in the salary range (22.9 percent)  Can’t find candidates in the hourly rate range (8.3 percent)  Difficult to attract candi- dates to Greater Cincin-  Lack appropriate educational/training opportunities in nati (12.5 percent) Greater Cincinnati (6.3 percent) 7
  8. 8. Chart 8 shows the activities that Greater Cincinnati area companies and organization are using toattract qualified candidates to the area. Chart 8: Literature, maps, guides, websites, social media sites for Greater Cincinnati prepared by your company or organization Actions/Incentives to Attract Qualified Candidates Literature, maps, guides, websites, social media sites for Greater Cincinnati prepared by other groups (e.g. Chambers of Commerce, realty to Greater Cincinnati firms, visitors bureaus, museums) by Percent of Total Responses for Each Relocation assistance (e.g., financial, moving, temporary housing, real Action/Incentive estate, spousal/partner job-hunting assistance) (Respondents Could Select More than One Action/Incentive) Provide face-to-face interaction with potential workplace peers, escorted tours or attendance at cultural/civic events to selected candidates during recruiting phase 9.8 41.5 Highly attractive benefits packages that exceed average benefits offerings for the Greater Cincinnati area 51.2 20.7 Personal integration into community (e.g., introductions to members of civic/community groups, company volunteer activities in the community) for new hires 30.5 32.9 Career growth incentives such as professional association memberships, meeting or conference registration fees, seminar registration fees 26.8 26.8 Company perks (e.g., company car, Metro passes, tax assistance, 12.2 39.0 increased insurance coverage, bonuses, stock options, financial planning, tickets to sport or cultural events, company cafeteria, company after-work gatherings, company holiday party/picnic) Tuition assistance for employee and/or employee’s spouse/partner and/or children Paid memberships to civic/community/cultural groups or for health clubIn addition to the responses indicated on Chart 8, respondents provided the following answers:  Signing bonuses, being more open to negotiation regarding benefits  Profit distribution into 401K, discount tickets/memberships/cell phones  Signing bonus for Teachers after six months, downtown parking paid by the Agency, wellness benefits (gym membership discounts, etc.)  We tell them we’re not within the city limits; we’re in one of the nicer suburbs. We try to distance ourselves from the City of Cincinnati.  Not actively attracting candidates to Greater Cincinnati. We don’t hire outside of Cincinnati.  Our openings are in the Indianapolis, IN area  This doesn’t apply to our hiring 8
  9. 9. Compensation Survey participants were asked if the salary and hourly rates paid to new hires in 2012 are higher, lower, or showed no change from those paid to new hires in 2011. Across all classifications, more than 50 percent of staffing and recruiting managers reported that 2012 salary and hourly rates in Greater Cincinnati have not changed from those paid to new hires in 2011. Table B breaks out the data on 2012 salaries and hourly rates. Table B — New Hires 2012 Salaries and Hourly Rates Compared to 2011 Salaries and Hourly Rates (Reported as percentage of respondents’ answers within each level) LEVEL: Non-Exempt Salaried LEVEL: LEVEL: Technical Hourly Supervisor, and Technical Manager, Non-Exempt and Director and LEVEL: Salaried Non- Hourly Non- Executive Exempt Technical Technical Higher than in 2011 39.2% 32.5% 30.0% 35.4% Lower than in 2011 1.3% 1.2% 0.0% 0.0% No Change from 2011 59.5% 66.3% 70.0% 64.6% The survey also asked about salary increase ranges being paid to current employees for the current fiscal year. Responses to this question are presented in Chart 9. Chart 9: Salary Range Increase Paid to Current Employees in Current Fiscal Year Displayed as Response Percentage for Each Salary Range w ithin a Job Classification Salary Ranges: No Increase Less than 1% 1%-1.9% 2%-3.9% 2%-3.9% 8% or Higher 60.0 56.2 55.2 56.6 54.8 53.4 53.8 51.3 51.9 50.0 50.0 45.6Percentage of Responses 40.0 31.1 32.1 32.5 29.5 28.6 29.5 26.4 27.7 26.1 30.0 24.7 16.7 18.2 16.7 20.0 14.3 15.6 12.5 13.8 10.0 11.2 9.6 10.0 6.7 4.4 4.5 3.4 4.5 2.2 1.1 2.2 1.1 2.3 1.1 2.4 2.4 1.2 2.4 2.3 0.0 Executive Director Manager Supervisor Exem pt - Exem pt - Non- Non- Non- Non- Technical Non- exem pt exem pt exem pt exem pt technical hourly - hourly- salaried - salaried - Technical Non- Technical Non- Techical Technical 9
  10. 10. Social Media and Candidate Sourcing MethodsIn the past few years, US business has moved from viewing social media as  Monster.comstrictly branding and advertising channels to social media as tools for business  Lur websiteprocesses, operations and engagement. Human Resources now uses socialmedia not only to create interest in the company among active job seekers, but With so much social media avail-also as a tool for sourcing and recruiting passive candidates. able for recruiting and hiring do staffing and recruiting managersSurvey participants were asked what percentage of their company’s or have confidence in the effective-organization’s human resources or recruiting annual budget is allocated to ness of any other methods tosocial media recruiting. The data from the Winter 2012 Survey show that source candidates? The answer ,budgets allocated to social media recruiting are trending up from the according to survey participants isdata reported in the 2011 survey: “Yes.”  57.0 percent of respondents reported that less than one percent of We asked survey participants budget is allocated to social media recruiting. This is up from the 54.5 to indicate the top three most percent of respondents in the 2011 survey. effective sourcing methods.  31.2 percent of respondents reported that between 1.0 percent and 4.9 The runaway winner: employee percent of budget is allocated to social media recruiting. This is slightly referrals, cited by 77.2 percent of below the 31.3 percent of respondents in the 2011 survey. respondents. The next two run- ners-up were commercial online  6.5 percent of respondents reported that between 10.0 percent and 19.9 job boards (i.e., Monster Career- , percent of budget is allocated to social media recruiting. This is up from builder), cited by 54.5 percent of the 6.0 percent of respondents in the 2011 survey. respondents and the company’s  3.2 percent of respondents reported that between 5.0 percent and 9.9 or organization’s website, cited percent of budget is allocated to social media recruiting. This is down by 38.6 percent of respondents. from the 7.1 percent of respondents in the 2011 survey. Survey respondents cited the  2.2 percent of respondents reported that 20.0 percent or more of budget following effective sourcing is allocated to social media recruiting. This is up from the 1.0 percent of methods in addition to the top respondents in the 2011 survey. three:LinkedIn is the big winner among the social media tools that survey  23.8 percent cited socialparticipants use in the recruiting and hiring process. LinkedIn is used by 83.1 mediapercent of the respondents. Survey participants were asked to indicate all ofthe social media tools used for recruiting and hiring new employees. The data  20.8 percent cited job fairs/showed that in addition to LinkedIn, the following social media tools are used: campus career services  Facebook is used by 47.2 percent of respondents  19.8 percent cited referrals from industry contacts  Craig’s List is used by 36.0 percent of respondents  17.8 percent cited  Twitter is used by 24.7 percent of respondents advertising in traditional  Google+ is used by 11.2 percent of respondents media (i.e., newspapers, magazines, professional  YouTube is used by 9.0% percent of respondents journals, TV radio, cable) ,  Google Social Media Analytics is used by 3.4 percent of respondents  13.9 percent each citedSurvey data showed that 2.2 percent of respondents used the following for search firms andrecruiting and hiring purposes: professional associations/ conferences  Online job board Monster  12.9 percent cited rehires of  Industry specific websites former employees  No social media  5.5 percent cited formerThe following social media and online job boards are each used by 1.1 percent college interns or formerof respondents in the recruiting and hiring process: CoOp students  Yammer.com  2.0 percent each cited  Bullhorn Reach.com college/university websites and military websites  TweetMyJobs.com 10
  11. 11. DemographicsThis section of the survey asked questions about the companies and organizations represented by thesurvey participants. Industry GroupsSurvey participants were asked what industry group their company or organizationbelonged to based upon standard industry classification. Table C presents the industriesreported by survey respondents. Table C Survey Participants by Industry Group Percentage of Industry Group Respondents Non-profit 16.7 Healthcare 16.7 Manufacturing 13.0 Education 7.4 Brand management 7.4 Financial – banking, insurance 5.6 Employment and staffing services 5.6 Retail 3.7 Information technology 3.7 Government – federal, state, local 3.7 Transportation 1.9 Telecommunications 1.9 Restaurant/Hospitality 1.9 Media and entertainment 1.9 Marketing and sales 1.9 Logistics 1.9 Employee leasing/PEO 1.9 Construction 1.9 Aviation management 1.9 Architectural services 1.9 Agribusiness 1.9 11
  12. 12. Location, Location, LocationData from the 2012 survey showed that the Greater Cincinnati area serves as animportant location for the companies and organizations represented by therespondents:  60.8 percent of respondents reported that their national/global headquarters is located in the tri-state area  21.6 percent of respondents said their regional/divisional headquarters is located in the tri - state area  9.3 percent of respondents reported that their subsidiary headquarters is located in the tri - state area  Just 14.4 percent of respondents reported that their national/global headquarters is location outside the tri-state area Employees in Organizations or CompaniesThe 2012 survey asked participants about the distribution of employees. Table D shows thepercentage of respondents who indicated their company or organization had employees or contract/temporary employees in specific locations. Table D Number of Employees in Organizations or Companies Represented by 2012 Survey Participants (Reported as Percentage of Respondents / Grey Shading = No Response) Contract/ Temporary Employees in the Number of Employees in the Employees in the Entire Company/ Employees Tri-State Tri-State Corporation Less than 10 2.0% 72.0% 2.0% 11-50 6.9% 16.1% 4.0% 51-100 16.8% 5.4% 9.0% 101-250 27.7% 3.2% 23.0% 251 or more 3.2% 251-500 13.9% 10.0% 501-1,000 9.9% 6.0% 1,001-2,000 6.9% 8.0% 2,001 or more 15.8% 2,001-5,000 14.0% 5,001-10,000 9.0% 10,001-15,000 3.0% 15,001-20,000 2.0% 20,001 and above 10.0% 12
  13. 13. Outlook for Second Quarter 2012The Winter 2012 Survey asked participants about anticipated hiring and staffing issues for the secondquarter (April, May and June) of 2012. According to the survey data, 83.0 percent of respondents re-port that their company or organization anticipates hiring during the second quarter.For those respondents who reported an anticipation of hiring in the second quarter:  56.6 percent anticipate hiring both to fill existing vacancies and hiring for new positions  35.3 percent anticipate hiring only to replace employees who leave vacancies in existing positions  Just 8.2 percent anticipate hiring only to add employees in new positions.The following three charts show data on the anticipated hiring in the second quarter 2012. Chart 10displays data on the anticipated positions to be filled during second quarter 2012. Chart 11 on page 14shows the anticipated hiring for contract/temporary employees during the second quarter 2012. Chart12 on page 14 displays data on the type of positions anticipated to be filled for contract/temporaryemployees. Chart 10: Positions Anticipated to be Filled in 2nd Qtr. 2012 by Percent of Total Responses for Each Position (Respondents Could Select More than One Position Level) 24.1 13.3 18.1 21.7 43.4 62.7 45.8 51.8 41.0 Executive Director Supervisor/Manager Exempt - Technical Exempt - Non-technical Non-exempt hourly - Technical Non-exempt hourly-Non-Techical Non-exempt salaried - Technical Non exempt salaried - Non-Technical 13
  14. 14. Chart 11: Anticipated Hiring Status for Contract/Temporary Employees* 2nd Qtr. 2012 Displayed As Percentage of Yes or No Responses (*defined as individuals w ho are NOT on com pany/organizations payroll and NOT benefits eligible) Yes No 100.0 90.0Percentage of Responses 80.0 70.0 61.5 73.8 73.8 73.0 60.0 86.4 50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 38.5 26.2 26.2 27.0 10.0 13.6 0.0 ANTICIPATE HIRING ANTICIPATE ADDING ANTICIPANT REPLACING ANTICIPATE HIRING DO NOT ANTICIPATE contractors/temporary contractors/temporary contractors/temporary contract/temporary HIRING employees to fill w hat employees to fill new employees to fill existing employees to eventually Contract/Temporary w ere formerly contracting/temporary contracting/temporary fill a company position Employees organizational/company jobs jobs jobs Hiring Status Chart 12: Positions Anticipated to be Filled for Contract/Temporary Employees in 2nd Qtr. 2012 by Percent of Total Responses for Each Position (Respondents Could Select More than One Position Level) 9.4 3.1 3.1 6.3 18 . 8 65.6 46.9 Executive Director Supervisor/Manager Exem pt - Technical Exem pt - Non-technical 2 1. 9 Non-exem pt hourly - Technical Non-exem pt hourly-Non-Techical 40.6 Non-exem pt salaried - Technical Non exem pt salaried - Non-Technical 14

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