Ohop creek restoration project presentation update 2010

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This is the presentation given by Jessica Moore, NW Trek's Education Program Coordinator, at the April 2010 Nisqually River Council meeting.

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  • The Ohop Creek restoration project is a joint effort between the South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group, the Nisqually Indian Tribe, The Nisqually Land Trust, Northwest Trek and the WA NatureMapping Program.
  • The goal of the project is to restore the original creek bed back to its meandering pathway through the valley. The creek has been diverted into an irrigation ditch for early agricultural activities. The valley has very little agricultural activity left and the irrigation ditch is no longer necessary. The South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group originally targeted the area as an excellent salmon restoration site. Once the project was designed, it was discovered that it was not only a benefit to the salmon, but many other native species could benefit from the project. Northwest Trek joined the project to provide data collection and monitoring of wildlife currently using the valley. The monitoring would continue through the construction and restoration phases of the project to determine what species will continue to use the valley, and what uses the area after the project is complete.Ground breaking began in the summer of 2009.
  • The goal of the project is to restore the original creek bed back to its meandering pathway through the valley. The creek has been diverted into an irrigation ditch for early agricultural activities. The valley has very little agricultural activity left and the irrigation ditch is no longer necessary. The South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group originally targeted the area as an excellent salmon restoration site. Once the project was designed, it was discovered that it was not only a benefit to the salmon, but many other native species could benefit from the project. Northwest Trek joined the project to provide data collection and monitoring of wildlife currently using the valley. The monitoring would continue through the construction and restoration phases of the project to determine what species will continue to use the valley, and what uses the area after the project is complete.Ground breaking began in the summer of 2009.
  • The goal of the project is to restore the original creek bed back to its meandering pathway through the valley. The creek has been diverted into an irrigation ditch for early agricultural activities. The valley has very little agricultural activity left and the irrigation ditch is no longer necessary. The South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group originally targeted the area as an excellent salmon restoration site. Once the project was designed, it was discovered that it was not only a benefit to the salmon, but many other native species could benefit from the project. Northwest Trek joined the project to provide data collection and monitoring of wildlife currently using the valley. The monitoring would continue through the construction and restoration phases of the project to determine what species will continue to use the valley, and what uses the area after the project is complete.Ground breaking began in the summer of 2009.
  •  Statistics for the Ohop Floodplain Planting40+ acres; 28,600 native trees and shrubs1 volunteer planting event (Oct 31st); 74 volunteers planted 1700 plants in 2 hours8 school classes in November; installed approximately 1400 plantsRest of planting contracted to Nisqually Tribe restoration crew; completed at end of February; all plant protectors installed by the end of MarchPlanting funded by NRCS Wetland Reserve Program and USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program (contributions from the Nisqually Tribe and South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group)2010-11 Planting Season: Additional 42+ acres; over 29,000 plants; volunteer planting planned for October 30th Also of note, the new channel banks were planted as a part of the South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group channel project; ~10,000 live stakes and bare root plants were planted along the banks
  • We are always looking for volunteers to join us in the data collection! There are two more trips scheduled for 2010:July 25thOctober 17thNo experience is needed and all ages are welcome. Volunteers must be able to be out in all types of weather and to walk across uneven terrain.Contact Jessica Moore at 360-832-7160 or jessica.moore@nwtrek.org to learn more or to sign up!
  • Ohop creek restoration project presentation update 2010

    1. 1. Ohop Creek Restoration Project Update<br />Data Collection and Monitoring<br />
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    16. 16. 2008 vs. 2010 Data Summary<br />
    17. 17. 2008 vs. 2010 Data Summary<br />
    18. 18. How Can You Help?<br />Participate in an Ohop Valley <br />Data Collection Trip!<br />July 25th 9am-noon<br />October 17th 9am-noon<br />Contact Jessica Moore @ 360-832-7160 or<br />jessica.moore@nwtrek.org<br />to sign up or get more details<br />

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