NISQUALLY WATERSHED STEWARDSHIP PLAN OVERVIEW
 
Nisqually Watershed Stewardship Plan
Management Area
Governance
Adaptive Management <ul><li>Annually – Retreat. </li></ul><ul><li>Council members will: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bring their ...
Mission <ul><li>To encourage and support sustainability in the watershed in order to steward the resources in perpetuity a...
Vision <ul><li>We live in a watershed where vibrant communities, a healthy natural environment and a prosperous, innovativ...
Vision
Guiding Principles <ul><li>We embrace a population with a sense of identity, belonging, and responsibility that spans gene...
Goals <ul><li>A viable, healthy natural resource base </li></ul><ul><li>A community that is healthy, wealthy and wise </li...
Pathways to Sustainability <ul><li>Involved Community </li></ul><ul><li>Biological Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Recreation/...
Involved Community <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Established sense of watershed community  </li></ul><ul><li>High deg...
Biological Diversity <ul><li>Aquatic Management </li></ul><ul><li>Terrestrial Plant Habitat Management </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Aquatic Management <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy native aquatic species </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul>...
Terrestrial Plant Habitat <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Viable ecoregions </li></ul><ul><li>Threatened and endangered...
Ecoregions
Wildlife Management <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Harvestable populations of native animals </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy...
Recreation-Public Access-Tourism <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural heritage tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Glacier-So...
Scenic Vistas <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Watershed looks like 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Vi...
Sustainable Economy <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy, vibrant economy </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable land value s...
Agriculture <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>No net loss of farmlands </li></ul><ul><li>Balance incentives and regulatio...
Forestry <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable harvest </li></ul><ul><li>99% of lands certified </li></ul><ul><li...
Green Business <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>New industries enhance sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></...
Shellfish Management <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy, abundant stocks and no shellfish beds restricted </li></u...
Fisheries <ul><li>50 year </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable trout and salmon harvest </li></ul><ul><li>Warm-water fisheries es...
Salmon Steelhead Distribution
Water <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Clean and available water </li></ul><ul><li>Supports population and habitat </li>...
Programs <ul><li>Low Impact Development and Architectural Guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainablility Certification </li>...
Ongoing Programs <ul><li>Nisqually Stream Stewards </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually Land Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually Rive...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Nisqually Watershed Stewardship Plan Overview

1,631 views

Published on

This is the presentation given by Justin Hall, Executive Director of the Nisqually River Foundation, at the Nisqually River Council's Planning Retreat in Mineral, WA on March 20, 2010.

Published in: Education
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • This is the presentation given by Justin Hall, Executive Director of the Nisqually River Foundation, at the Nisqually River Council's Planning Retreat in Mineral, WA on March 20, 2010.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,631
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
87
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The Nisqually River, recognized as a “River of Statewide Significance” under the 1972 Washington State Shorelands Management Act, supports extensive salmon and steelhead runs, timber and agricultural resources, and hydropower generation. The Nisqually is also home to several threatened and endangered species. It offers a variety of popular recreational opportunities, and provides over half of the fresh water flow entering southern Puget Sound. This 78-mile waterway, the only watershed in the United States with its headwaters enclosed by a National Park and its delta protected by a National Wildlife Refuge, remains one of the least degraded of the major Puget Sound rivers. Preserving this beautiful river has been the deliberate focus of tribal, state and local government efforts over the past twenty years. The Nisqually Stewardship plan, a plan that that integrates the community, the economy and the environment, seeks to obtain a sustainable future for the watershed. The purpose of this presentation is to quickly introduce you to key elements of the 62-page Stewardship Plan and answer questions or go into more detail those areas that interest you.
  • The Nisqually River Management Area is the entire Nisqually watershed as defined by the Washington State Department of Ecology as Water Resource Inventory Area 11. It is one complex system of human and natural sub-systems, constantly engaging in productive and destructive activities. As I mentioned in the opening slide, the Nisqually watershed begins at Mount Rainier National Park and extends 78 river miles northeast, flowing into Puget Sound at the Nisqually River National Wildlife Refuge. The Nisqually River Basin drains XXX square miles of truly picturesque landscape and extremely varied terrain and ecosystems, including mountainous ice and snow in the National Park near Ashford, rare prairie habitat across Fort Lewis , to a woodland and salt water marine environment near Dupont and Lacey. The Nisqually River and its sub basins are home to all species of salmon found in the Pacific Northwest, elk, deer, XXX and XXX. (Need help with the summary)
  • The Nisqually River Council coordinates and analyzes policy issues relating to the implementation of the Nisqually Watershed Stewardship Plan. It also acts as a clearinghouse and coordinating unit for Nisqually River interests. It has limited powers, with no independent regulatory or land acquisition authority. It elects its own officers and establishes subcommittees as necessary. It is required to hold public meetings at least annually. The membership of the Nisqually River Council includes the following entities. The Council has a permanently established executive committee and four advisory committees. These committees are laid out as follows The Citizen’s Advisory Committee is the place where individuals interested in their watershed and wanting to be a part of the management of the watershed can come to participate in the Nisqually River Council. There will be three additional advisory committees. The purpose of the Economy, Community, and Environment Committees will be to gain representation and advice from organizations working within the watershed. Organizations (businesses, community service organizations, and environmental organizations) will be solicited to provide a representative to the appropriate advisory committee. This will provide a level of engagement for both the current Council members and for those organizations that have not formally existed before.
  • The Nisqually Stewardship plan has as its foundation a vision based on land, water and people. We live in a watershed where vibrant communities, a healthy natural environment and a prosperous, innovative economy are valued. Our waters, from glacier to Sound, run clean and clear, fish and wildlife thrive in our streams, forests and prairies. People are drawn to live, work, and play in our rural landscape. As stewards of our land and water we value our working farms and forests which protect our natural, cultural, and scenic heritage.
  • These are the ultimate goals or outcomes of the Nisqually Stewardship plan, and I will describe each of these in more detail.
  • The specific actions in these next sections were developed in order to achieve the long-term vision of a sustainable watershed and building a model for stewardship and harmonious living. They are organized into five categories, or pathways to sustainability as we call them: Involved Community, Biological Diversity, Recreation/Public Access/Tourism, Sustainable Economy, and Water. The specific actions of each category that I will now describe contain elements that speak to the plan’s overall goals.
  • The desire is to have a healthy functioning community that makes decisions that have a positive impact on watershed sustainability. It is also the aim to create a watershed community that transcends the civic boundaries of towns, cities and counties into a single community from the glacier to the sound. By 2055, an involved, a functioning involved community has a-- Sense of watershed community extends through the environment to economic vitality and community health. A high degree of volunteerism exists in the watershed. Residents are invested in the stewardship of their watershed ‑ “responsible stewardship”. In 25 years, or 2030 t he Nisqually community has an established identity with full participation from all sub-areas. By 2015 t here are community forums based on the Ohop forum model in all five sub-areas of the watershed, and participation in the Nisqually Watershed Festival has increased.
  • Often it is the species of economic importance that get the most attention, whether it be the geoduck or the Douglas fir or the salmon. However, the economically important species make up a relatively small portion of the total biota, and it is imperative that the full complement of native communities and species also be maintained and restored. It is the diversity of life that reaches up from the Sound through the prairies, towns, and forests through to the alpine meadows that makes the Nisqually River watershed such a unique and wonderful place.
  • Aquatic management includes non-commercial species of fish and shellfish and aquatic plants and habitats. Water quality has a primary impact on aquatic habitats and species, and improvement and maintenance of water quality is of utmost importance—so important that it falls under its own specific goal. The goal is to restore natural watershed processes and functions that support healthy aquatic life. Aquatic management planning and actions by 2055 will ensure that h ealthy native populations of all aquatic species exist. By 2015 we expect that a program for invasive species management has been developed. In the next 5 years, we will-- Identify and map areas used by freshwater fish and shellfish species. Identify areas of concern from invasive species.
  • By 2055 implementation of the stewardship plan will ensure that-- There is a viable amount of each of the ecoregions that fall in the watershed. (Permanent Ice and Snow, Alpine, Mountain Hemlock, Silver Fir, Costal Western Hemlock, Puget Sound Douglas Fir, Woodland Prairie Mix). All threatened and endangered plants in the watershed are fully restored. All invasive plants have been removed. In 25 years, or by 2030-- Native habitat in mainstem area of the Nisqually watershed has been fully restored. An invasive removal program has been implemented and additional native plants have been established in the lower Nisqually watershed. By 2015-- Native habitat in the upper Nisqually watershed has been fully restored. An invasive removal program has been implemented and additional native plants have been established in the mainstem area of the Nisqually watershed, In the next five years, we plan to-- Develop an Oak habitat protection program. Identify ecoregions, identify and map areas, and promote preservation. Develop and implement an invasive species removal program.
  • Plants are everywhere; they fill every niche and quickly move into any disturbance in the soil. The Nisqually watershed has seven ecoregions ranging, from the permanent ice and snow of Mt. Rainier to the Puget Sound Douglas Fir of the Puget Sound lowlands. The changes in the terrestrial habitats have put some plants in jeopardy and allowed other, nonnative species to invade. By working to remove the invasive species and restore the threatened and endangered species, we will maintain the biodiversity of the watershed and the region.
  • Healthy populations of diverse wildlife species are a key indicator of ecosystem health. Robust wildlife populations provide important recreational and economic opportunities in the watershed. Therefore, upland wildlife habitat management must have a key role in the overall goals of the watershed. Hunting is an important cultural and economic element of wildlife management, and observing wildlife is also of great economic importance. For Wildlife Management planning efforts, by 2055, will result in— Harvestable populations of all native Nisqually game animals and adequate access to hunting lands. Healthy, viable populations of all native non-game species. All state and federal threatened and endangered species fully restored in the Nisqually watershed. In 25 years, or by 2030-- Wildlife habitats have been protected and expanded. A game management plan has been fully implemented. All actions for a non-game species plan have been implemented. In 10 years-- Significant progress has been made on the habitat action plan from the specific game management plan. Priority actions for game species have been implemented. Priority actions for non-game species have been implemented.
  • Tourism has long been a mainstay of visits to the watershed, with Mt. Rainier being the anchor that has brought people to the area. As we move into the future, tourism will continue to be a major part of the watershed economy. By embracing and planning for the visitors, we can raise knowledge of and appreciation for the Nisqually watershed. In 50 years we see— A Cultural Heritage Tourism model is in place, providing year round activities based on cultural and natural resources of the region (intrinsic) and “real” experiences. There is a glacier-to-Sound “Nisqually River” trail system, with voluntary participation by land owners; that recreates the historic tribal trading route. Public access opportunities in the watershed have been increased across a variety of land ownerships. An integrated system of recreational opportunities is in place. It provides a range of opportunities that protect the resource in areas which can sustain impact and preserves those areas required for sustainability of the basin’s natural resources. In 25 years, or by 2030-- 50 percent of the glacier-to-Sound trail is open. 20 percent of the visitors to the watershed come for heritage tourism. In 10 years-- Nisqually Mashel State Park is open. A coordinated recreation plan, including provisions for visitor management, economic development, and marketing, is in effect throughout the basin giving people directions to available opportunities and assisting in recreation dispersal. There are five gateways into the watershed, with all other roads in having smaller logo signs. 10 percent of the glacier-to-Sound trail is open. A vital agriculture tourism industry exists.
  • 
  • A sustainable economy that is built on sustainable industries is critical to the success of this plan and the Nisqually watershed as a whole. Without good jobs and opportunities for investment back into the community, all that can be done is reactive. With those opportunities comes the chance to be proactive. The traditional natural resource-based industries of the watershed are broken out next, each with specific goals. We believe that by 2055-- There will be a healthy vibrant economy that places value on the attributes that make the Nisqually watershed a wonderful place to live and that a sustainability land value system has been established. In 25 years, or by 2030, t here will be diversified economic opportunities consistent with the basin-wide community identity. In 10 years, we will have-- There are local based business infrastructure and economic development investment opportunities. The visitor economy has been stabilized, with year-round extended seasons. Community identities that attract business have been established compatible with the 50-year vision of values and sustainability. In the next 5 years we have a lot to do to— Implement the basin-wide economic development plan. Promote a heritage tourism industry. Encourage and enable small to mid-sized locally based and owned businesses and develop a “newcomer” investment strategy for planned growth. Define the value-based products created within the basin, such as agriculture, forestry, manufacturing, tourism, services for locals, and define the obstructions to them.
  • Agriculture has a long and vital history in the Nisqually watershed. Increasingly, agriculture is coming under threat from development and market pressures. The maintenance of agricultural lands in working agriculture is an important component in habitat protection in the watershed. The stewardship plan, with careful implementation, will ensure by 2055 that-- There will be no net loss of farmlands from 2005 productivity. A balance will have been achieved between incentives and regulations so that they work together to promote sustainability and economic viability. The connection between urban and rural has been strengthened through a knowledge of farming and its needs. By 2030 Previously developed farm conservation plans are fully implemented. By 2015-- Conservation plans for all commercial farms in the watershed have been developed . Incentives that promote purchase of development rights and/or conservation easements have been created. There are conservation plans for all small farms as requested by landowners. In the next 5 years, this plan ensures that we -- Provide technical assistance for sustainable agriculture. Promote the local economy, for example, farmers markets and community-supported agriculture. Achieve a balance between incentives and regulations. Develop a pamphlet for new small farmers with five acres or less. Promote the connection between the urban and rural community, such as tours promoting understanding of farming and farmers’ issues.
  • Forestry, along with agriculture, spent many years as the heart of the economy of the Nisqually watershed and still plays a vital role. The maintenance of lands in forestry and the sustainable use of both timber and non-timber products remain an important part of the economy of the watershed. Through the efforts guided by this plan by 2055 we expect that to have a productive forest land base that is at the current (2005) size or larger. That there is a there is a regulated, enforced program of sustainable harvest of timber and non-timber products. Also we will have a sustainable locally supported industry for harvest of non-timber products, and that 99 percent of the lands are in a certification program. By 2030 a viable working forest landscape exists. In the more near term, within the next 10 years, there will be: There is a viable sustainable timber economy. Infrastructure is in place so that people can sell their products. Within the next 5 years, we expect to: Support development of incentive packages for timber production, and the local use of timber. Support and expand small landowner assistance programs in the watershed, including United States Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, and UW Pack Forest. Promote sustainable harvest practices and marketing of non-timber products. Bring together resources, regulations, and contracts for non timber products. Develop programs to assist in sustainable harvest and marketing of timber products as well as non-timber. Support local use of local timber.
  • The heart of the sustainable economy in the Nisqually watershed will be attracting green business and industry to the watershed to serve as the economic drivers. Sustainable business concepts include energy efficiency, waste reduction, local manufacture and use, reduce packaging, reusable materials, etc. We see that by 2055 a ll new industries enhance the sustainability of the watershed. By 2030 e xisting industries meet or exceed the current standards to enhance the sustainability of the watershed. By 2015 a mechanism for attracting green business has been implemented through partnerships and networking, and in the next 5 years we have adequately defined and set up a mechanism for attracting green business.
  • The primary threat to shellfish harvest—tribal, recreational and commercial—is degradation of water quality. Therefore, the water goal is closely linked to this goal, and improving and maintaining water quality will serve to meet both goals. Also important to shellfish harvest is access for recreational harvesters and vital markets for commercial growers and commercial and tribal harvesters. By 2055 we expect there to be healthy and abundant shellfish stocks that are safe to eat, and no shellfish beds are restricted because of contaminated water. By 2015 we expect that recreational access to shellfish beds has been enhanced.
  • Fisheries are an integral part of the history and culture of the Nisqually watershed. They also serve as an indicator of the overall health of the watershed. Salmon and steelhead in particular play a vital role in the watershed life cycle. Extensive efforts are ongoing to restore the long-term health of these species, and this plan seeks to bolster those efforts. Also important are the warm-water species that provide recreational opportunities in the lakes throughout the watershed. The goal is to restore the natural watershed processes and functions that support healthy fisheries. Within the next 50 years we plan that-- All natural salmon and trout populations have been restored to levels that support an abundant harvest. Warm-water fisheries compatible with healthy populations of native fish have been established. All natural populations are self-sustaining.
  • In the next 10 years-- Critical salmon and steel-head areas have been mapped and t he Chinook habitat action plan has been fully implemented. Local markets for fisheries products have been developed and expanded. Warm water species have been mapped and a warm-water fisheries plan is in place, and An upper watershed fisheries plan has been developed.
  • Water is the sustainer and purifier of the Nisqually; whether it is fisheries or wildlife or development or the health of our communities. Protection and maintenance of the water quality and quantity is critical. Local use of local water is the best way to handle the future water needs of the basin’s residents. Also important is the presence of three hydropower facilities within the watershed. The hydropower operators have become vital partners in the efforts to maintain and restore the watershed. Our long term and intermediate objectives are to ensure that--   Water is clean and available and supports the needs of the population without impacting habitat. There is adequate potable water for communities in keeping with reasonable growth. There are no impaired water bodies. The Nisqually Watershed Management plan has fully implemented There is maximum reuse or reinfiltration of water in the basin. Hydropower facilities in the watershed are supported in a manner that best protects ecosystem function while also meeting the power needs of the communities.
  • The Nisqually River Council is developing programs that will assist in achieve our specific goals implementing the Stewardship Plan. The Council, working with members of the community, local government, and the tribe, has written low-impact development guidelines and is working with the counties to enable ordinances for the streamlined development of low-impact developments. The Council will facilitate voluntary certification of sustainable practices and businesses by independent certification organizations and programs. We will develop this into a Nisqually label recognizable as a local and regional marketing tool. Every five years the Council will produce a watershed characterization by Habitat, Scenic, Developable, Protected, Working Agriculture/Forest, and Rural General. This characterization will guide the River Council in meeting with watershed landowners to develop mutually supporting and voluntary property-specific plans that, when taken as a whole, meet the watershed community’s objectives. Every three years, the Council will seek to produce a snapshot of the watershed and a measure of its health. The report card will show the key indicators of watershed health on a continuing basis. Education and interpretation will continue to be a major component of the Nisqually River Council’s efforts and will continue to be into the future, particularly integration of sustainability into education coordination. Modeled on the Shellfish Stewardship Pledge, the Nisqually Pledge will be a way for individuals to volunteer to make changes in their activities and actions and to move towards sustainability. In return, the program provides incentives that reward them for their actions.
  • Let me highlight some of the Nisqually River Council programs already in place. The Nisqually Stream Stewards teaches volunteers and landowners how to assess stream health, evaluate salmon habitat potential, gather data about their local creeks, and identify places in the watershed where projects could improve the river system. The Nisqually Land Trust protects and restores critical wildlife habitat in the Nisqually River Basin by acquiring title, easements, and other property rights from willing sellers. The Nisqually River Education Project provides field-based environmental science education opportunities for students throughout the Nisqually River area. The planned Nisqually River Interpretive Center is an initiative of the Nisqually River Council to tell the story of the Nisqually from “mountain to sea” to children and adults locally, around the state and region and even internationally. The shellfish stewardship pledge asks landowners to take a pledge to reduce their negative impact on water quality in areas that have an impact on shellfish. It includes sections on animal waste, septic, run-off, storm water ponds, impervious surfaces, and lawns and watering.
  • Nisqually Watershed Stewardship Plan Overview

    1. 1. NISQUALLY WATERSHED STEWARDSHIP PLAN OVERVIEW
    2. 3. Nisqually Watershed Stewardship Plan
    3. 4. Management Area
    4. 5. Governance
    5. 6. Adaptive Management <ul><li>Annually – Retreat. </li></ul><ul><li>Council members will: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bring their organization’s strategic plans to the retreat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review and evaluate ongoing and completed projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review the current year’s strategic plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set a strategic plan for next calendar year (9 months ahead) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine roles for council members in plan implementation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Every other year </li></ul><ul><li>Update five- year plan </li></ul><ul><li>Revisit Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Every 5 Years </li></ul><ul><li>Revisit Vision and Mission </li></ul><ul><li>Update Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Every 10 Years </li></ul><ul><li>Review entire management plan </li></ul>
    6. 7. Mission <ul><li>To encourage and support sustainability in the watershed in order to steward the resources in perpetuity and build a model for harmonious living. </li></ul>
    7. 8. Vision <ul><li>We live in a watershed where vibrant communities, a healthy natural environment and a prosperous, innovative economy are valued. </li></ul><ul><li>Our waters, from glacier to Sound, run clean and clear, fish and wildlife thrive in our streams, forests and prairies. </li></ul><ul><li>People are drawn to live, work, and play in our rural landscape. </li></ul><ul><li>As stewards of our land and water we value our working farms and forests which protect our natural, cultural, and scenic heritage. </li></ul>
    8. 9. Vision
    9. 10. Guiding Principles <ul><li>We embrace a population with a sense of identity, belonging, and responsibility that spans generations and fits within the broader context of the region and the planet. </li></ul><ul><li>We embrace a diverse landscape that supports essential ecological functions, viable populations of all native species, economic prosperity, and social wellbeing. </li></ul><ul><li>We embrace vibrant local economy connected to the watershed and that values the watershed resources. </li></ul><ul><li>We embrace the utilization of all practical tools to provide for planning, benchmarking, and evaluation to facilitate positive change. </li></ul>
    10. 11. Goals <ul><li>A viable, healthy natural resource base </li></ul><ul><li>A community that is healthy, wealthy and wise </li></ul><ul><li>Increased economic productivity in a sustainable manner </li></ul><ul><li>The development of a stewardship ethic </li></ul>
    11. 12. Pathways to Sustainability <ul><li>Involved Community </li></ul><ul><li>Biological Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Recreation/Public Access/Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable Economy </li></ul><ul><li>Water </li></ul>
    12. 13. Involved Community <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Established sense of watershed community </li></ul><ul><li>High degree of volunteerism </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Established Nisqually community identity </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Sub basin community forums </li></ul>
    13. 14. Biological Diversity <ul><li>Aquatic Management </li></ul><ul><li>Terrestrial Plant Habitat Management </li></ul><ul><li>Wildlife Management </li></ul>
    14. 15. Aquatic Management <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy native aquatic species </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Invasive aquatic species plan </li></ul>
    15. 16. Terrestrial Plant Habitat <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Viable ecoregions </li></ul><ul><li>Threatened and endangered plants restored </li></ul><ul><li>Invasive plants removed </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Native habitat in main-stem area fully restored. </li></ul><ul><li>An invasive removal program is in place </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Native habitat in upper watershed restored </li></ul>
    16. 17. Ecoregions
    17. 18. Wildlife Management <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Harvestable populations of native animals </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy non-game populations </li></ul><ul><li>Threatened and endangered restored </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Habitats protected and expanded </li></ul><ul><li>Game and non game management plan implemented </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Significant progress on habitat </li></ul><ul><li>Priority actions accomplished </li></ul>
    18. 19. Recreation-Public Access-Tourism <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural heritage tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Glacier-Sound trail </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated and sustainable recreation </li></ul><ul><li>Public access </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>50% of Glacier-Sound trail open </li></ul><ul><li>20% visitors Heritage Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually Park Open </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinated recreation plan in effect </li></ul><ul><li>five, signed gateways into the watershed </li></ul><ul><li>10% of the Glacier-to-Sound trail is open </li></ul><ul><li>Vital agriculture tourism industry exists. </li></ul>
    19. 20. Scenic Vistas <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Watershed looks like 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Viewpoints protected </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Priority Viewpoints Protected </li></ul>
    20. 21. Sustainable Economy <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy, vibrant economy </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable land value system </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Diversified opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Community identities </li></ul><ul><li>Visitor Economy Established </li></ul><ul><li>Strong local business infrastructure </li></ul>
    21. 22. Agriculture <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>No net loss of farmlands </li></ul><ul><li>Balance incentives and regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Urban/Rural Connection </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Implement farm conservation plans </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Farm plans for all commercial farms </li></ul><ul><li>Transfer of development rights and conservation easements </li></ul><ul><li>Conservation plans for all small farms </li></ul>
    22. 23. Forestry <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable harvest </li></ul><ul><li>99% of lands certified </li></ul><ul><li>2005 landbase or larger </li></ul><ul><li>Non-timber products industry </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Viable working forest landscape </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Viable, sustainable timber economy </li></ul>
    23. 24. Green Business <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>New industries enhance sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Existing industries meet standards </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Implement mechanism to attract green business </li></ul>
    24. 25. Shellfish Management <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy, abundant stocks and no shellfish beds restricted </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy shellfish beds </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Recreational beds enhanced </li></ul>
    25. 26. Fisheries <ul><li>50 year </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable trout and salmon harvest </li></ul><ul><li>Warm-water fisheries established </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Natural populations self-sustaining </li></ul><ul><li>Fully implemented multispecies plan </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Chinook habitat action plan implemented </li></ul><ul><li>Local markets for fisheries products </li></ul><ul><li>Warm-water fisheries plan is in place. </li></ul><ul><li>Upper watershed fisheries plan has been developed. </li></ul>
    26. 27. Salmon Steelhead Distribution
    27. 28. Water <ul><li>50 years </li></ul><ul><li>Clean and available water </li></ul><ul><li>Supports population and habitat </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum reuse </li></ul><ul><li>Management plan implemented </li></ul><ul><li>Hydropower operation protects ecosystem </li></ul><ul><li>There are no impaired (polluted) water bodies. </li></ul><ul><li>2514 plan fully implemented. </li></ul><ul><li>30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate in-stream flow </li></ul><ul><li>10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Water conservation program established </li></ul><ul><li>TMDL implementation completed </li></ul><ul><li>Municipal wastewater reuse feasibility studies </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for failing septic systems </li></ul>
    28. 29. Programs <ul><li>Low Impact Development and Architectural Guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainablility Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Watershed Characterization </li></ul><ul><li>Watershed Health Report Card </li></ul><ul><li>Education and Interpretation </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually Pledge </li></ul>
    29. 30. Ongoing Programs <ul><li>Nisqually Stream Stewards </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually Land Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually River Education </li></ul><ul><li>Nisqually Interpretive Center </li></ul><ul><li>Shellfish Stewardship Pledge </li></ul>

    ×