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Monitoring the Nisqually Delta<br />Kelley TurnerUSGS Western Ecological Research CenterJohn Takekawa (Project Principal I...
Estuarine Habitat Loss<br />Puget Sound 2,500 km2<br />> 80% historic estuarine habitat lost<br />Active pursuit of the re...
Nisqually Delta Restorations<br />Nisqually River<br />McAllister Creek<br />Pilot<br />9 acres restored in 1996<br />Phas...
Estuaries<br />One of the most productive landscapes on earth<br />Support a wide variety of wildlife<br />Nurseries of th...
Mudflats
Tidal channels
Tidal marshes
Freshwater wetlands
Riparian forested wetlands</li></ul>J. Takekawa,Jan 2011<br />
Estuarine habitats are places of change<br />
Why monitor?<br />Monitoring has been described as the financial equivalent of accounting, and is critical for project eva...
 on restoration effectiveness
 as a measure of accountability
 for land managers to make management decisions
 for the restoration community as a whole</li></li></ul><li>All scales:<br />Change Detection <br />through Monitoring<br ...
	Monitoring stations<br /><ul><li>Coordinated sampling of a suite of physical and biological parameters for greater spatia...
July 2009<br />Source: USGS<br />
December 2009<br />Source: USGS<br />
July 2010<br />Source: USGS<br />
July 2011<br />Source: USGS<br />
Shannon North<br />Post Dike Removal<br />August 2011<br />
Hydrology<br />
Hydrology<br />
Sediment and Geomorphology<br />
Historic Channels of the Nisqually River Delta - 1878<br />Historic water channels in the Nisqually Delta.  Estuary restor...
Nisqually Delta Channel Development<br />1878<br />December 2009<br />2005<br />Sources: US Coast Survey - Topography of P...
<ul><li> Animal slough (reference)
lowest average elevation (i.e. deepest)
 more developed and scoured
 Shannon slough
highest average elevation (i.e. shallowest)
 newly restored</li></li></ul><li>Channel Cross Section<br />
Sediment and Geomorphology<br />
Marsh Elevation Mapping<br />Pilot, 1996<br />Phase I, 2002<br />
Species Richness by Elevation<br />
-1.122 m<br />2.996 m<br />2.713 m<br />Weinmann, F., et al. Wetland Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: U.S. Army C...
Plant Elevation Ranges<br />
Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© La Maison Léon-Provancher, 2009<br />
Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© Sandy Richard, 2008<br />
Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© Peter Baye, 2007<br />
Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© Peter Baye, 2007<br />
Vegetation Monitoring<br />
Vegetation Monitoring<br />
Invasive Species<br />
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Monitoring the Nisqually Delta

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This is the presentation given by Kelley Turner at the August 2011 Nisqually River Council meeting.

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Monitoring the Nisqually Delta

  1. 1. Monitoring the Nisqually Delta<br />Kelley TurnerUSGS Western Ecological Research CenterJohn Takekawa (Project Principal Investigator) & Isa Woo (Project Coordinator)<br />Nisqually River Council Meeting<br />19 August 2011<br />Olympia, WA<br />
  2. 2. Estuarine Habitat Loss<br />Puget Sound 2,500 km2<br />> 80% historic estuarine habitat lost<br />Active pursuit of the recovery of Puget Sound ecosystems through estuarine restoration<br />Nisqually Delta Restorations<br />
  3. 3. Nisqually Delta Restorations<br />Nisqually River<br />McAllister Creek<br />Pilot<br />9 acres restored in 1996<br />Phase I<br />31 acres restored in 2002<br />Phase II<br />100 acres restored in 2006<br />Nisqually NWR<br />762 acres restored in 2009<br />2009, 762 acres<br />1996, 9 acres<br />2002, 31 acres<br />2006, 100 acres<br />
  4. 4. Estuaries<br />One of the most productive landscapes on earth<br />Support a wide variety of wildlife<br />Nurseries of the sea<br />Foraging ground for migratory birds<br />Protect inland areas from flooding<br />Filter pollutants<br />Provide economic, recreational and aesthetic value<br /><ul><li>Open water
  5. 5. Mudflats
  6. 6. Tidal channels
  7. 7. Tidal marshes
  8. 8. Freshwater wetlands
  9. 9. Riparian forested wetlands</li></ul>J. Takekawa,Jan 2011<br />
  10. 10. Estuarine habitats are places of change<br />
  11. 11. Why monitor?<br />Monitoring has been described as the financial equivalent of accounting, and is critical for project evaluation (Lee 1993)<br />Monitoring provides information: <br /><ul><li> on restoration progress
  12. 12. on restoration effectiveness
  13. 13. as a measure of accountability
  14. 14. for land managers to make management decisions
  15. 15. for the restoration community as a whole</li></li></ul><li>All scales:<br />Change Detection <br />through Monitoring<br />Delta scale:<br />Offshore to onshore gradient<br />Site scale:<br />Restoration trajectories by age<br />Restoration performance:<br />Food Webs<br />Site Unit scale:<br />Rapid vs. Intensive monitoring<br />Randomized Complete Block:<br />Salt Marsh Colonization <br />Experiment <br />
  16. 16. Monitoring stations<br /><ul><li>Coordinated sampling of a suite of physical and biological parameters for greater spatial relationships</li></li></ul><li>
  17. 17. July 2009<br />Source: USGS<br />
  18. 18. December 2009<br />Source: USGS<br />
  19. 19. July 2010<br />Source: USGS<br />
  20. 20. July 2011<br />Source: USGS<br />
  21. 21. Shannon North<br />Post Dike Removal<br />August 2011<br />
  22. 22. Hydrology<br />
  23. 23. Hydrology<br />
  24. 24. Sediment and Geomorphology<br />
  25. 25. Historic Channels of the Nisqually River Delta - 1878<br />Historic water channels in the Nisqually Delta. Estuary restoration will reconnect 21.4 miles of sloughs. <br />Based on 1878 T-Sheets by Collins & Montgomery of UW. J. Cutler of Nisqually Tribe, 2007.<br />
  26. 26. Nisqually Delta Channel Development<br />1878<br />December 2009<br />2005<br />Sources: US Coast Survey - Topography of Puget Sound - Nisqually to Totten Inlet, US Geological Survey, Washington State Department of Natural Resources/University of Washington Puget Sound River History Project. Data derived by Jennifer Cutler<br />Cartography by Jennifer Cutler, Nisqually Indian Tribe<br />Cartography by Heather Minnella, USGS WERC<br />
  27. 27.
  28. 28. <ul><li> Animal slough (reference)
  29. 29. lowest average elevation (i.e. deepest)
  30. 30. more developed and scoured
  31. 31. Shannon slough
  32. 32. highest average elevation (i.e. shallowest)
  33. 33. newly restored</li></li></ul><li>Channel Cross Section<br />
  34. 34. Sediment and Geomorphology<br />
  35. 35. Marsh Elevation Mapping<br />Pilot, 1996<br />Phase I, 2002<br />
  36. 36.
  37. 37. Species Richness by Elevation<br />
  38. 38. -1.122 m<br />2.996 m<br />2.713 m<br />Weinmann, F., et al. Wetland Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1984.<br />Tidal datum elevations from NOAA Dupont Wharf, Nisqually Reach tide station (cite?)<br />
  39. 39. Plant Elevation Ranges<br />
  40. 40. Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© La Maison Léon-Provancher, 2009<br />
  41. 41. Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© Sandy Richard, 2008<br />
  42. 42. Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© Peter Baye, 2007<br />
  43. 43. Plant Elevation Ranges<br />© Peter Baye, 2007<br />
  44. 44. Vegetation Monitoring<br />
  45. 45. Vegetation Monitoring<br />
  46. 46. Invasive Species<br />
  47. 47. Continuous currents and sediment flux<br />Trapping inLake Alder?<br />Quarterlycross-sectionprofiles<br />StudyingLake Alder<br />FloodTransport?<br />Ebb Transport<br />Nearshore Response and Forecasting<br />Nearshore Response and Forecasting<br />Develop sediment budget: sufficient for marsh to keep pace with sea-level rise?<br />750 ac<br />Goal1: Quantify net sediment flux in or out<br />Goal2: Determine processes that transport sediment to/from delta<br />
  48. 48. Surface Elevation Tables (SET)<br />Photo: Jesse Barham<br />
  49. 49. Surface Elevation Tables<br />NNWR<br />Phase II<br />Reference<br />
  50. 50. Map benthic habitats to assess resources (eelgrass) and future change (land use, climate)<br />
  51. 51. Monitor nearshore invertebrate community (food-prey resource) response to new salt marsh, climate change<br />Nearshore Response and Forecasting<br />Annelida - Manayunkia aestuarina <br />WWU<br />Arthropoda – Muscidae larvae<br />Valley City State University<br />
  52. 52. Monitor nearshore invertebrate community (food-prey resource) response to new salt marsh, climate change<br />Nearshore Response and Forecasting<br />
  53. 53. Bird Monitoring<br />
  54. 54. Bird Abundance by Foraging Guild <br />Dike removal<br />
  55. 55.
  56. 56. http://www.nisquallydeltarestoration.org<br />http://www.fws.gov/nisqually/<br />
  57. 57. Project Partners and Collaborators<br />Funded by EPA, ESRP, FWS and Students in Support of Native American Relations<br />USGS Western Ecological Research Center<br />J. Y. Takekawa (Project Principal Investigator), I. Woo (Project Coordinator), J. Shinn, A. Naljahih, H. Vaska, S. Bishop, J. Felis, B. Perry, L. Smith, W. Chan, E. Flynn, TESC Graduate Students (L. Belleveau & H. Allgood), UW Tacoma Intern (H. Minnella), Nicholls State University Intern (J. Bell)<br />Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge<br />J. Takekawa, D. Roster, J. Barham,M. Bailey and Refuge Volunteers<br />Nisqually Indian Tribe<br />J. Dorner, F. Leischner, E. Perez J. Cutler and S. Hodgson<br />Nisqually River Foundation<br />M. Holt, C. Iverson, A. David<br />Ducks Unlimited<br />D. Golner, S. Liske and P. Schulte<br />Avian Design<br />C. Fox<br />USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center<br />G. Guntenspergen, J. Lynch and J. Olker<br />USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Geology<br />E. Grossman, P. Swarzenski, R. Kayen and D. Finlayson<br />USGS Western Fisheries Research Center<br />S. Rubin, K. Larsen and A. Lind-Null<br />USGS Washington Water Science Center<br />R. Dinicola, C. Curran<br />Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife<br />M. Hayes<br />Nisqually Reach Nature Center<br />D. Hull<br />

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