Reducing feral camel impacts across remote
Australia:
Australian Feral Camel Management Project
21st November 2013, Parlia...
Session Three: Achievements and Outcomes
Speakers:
Mark Lethbridge, Ecoknowledge
Jayne Brim Box, Northern Territory Govern...
Building Capacity:
Aboriginal People &
Camel Management
Sam Rando
Central Land Council
• Statutory Authority under the
Aboriginal Land Rights
(Northern Territory) Act 1976
• 417,318 km² is...
Camel Densities within the CLC Region
Before the Australian Feral
Camel Management Project
• In 2009, CLC employed a Feral Animal Education Officer
(camels) to ...
Cultural Issues
• Feral animals were not
viewed differently to native
animals
• Culling / “shoot to waste”
was not cultura...
Building Capacity

Assisting
Traditional Owners
to make
informed decisions
about Camel
Management on
Aboriginal Land

Buil...
Traditional Owner Consultation & Education
• Country visits for Traditional Owners to see ‘first
hand’ the camel-related d...
Changes in Attitudes
• Feral camels – from benign
animal to pest animal
• Traditional Owners granted
consent for camel
man...
Camel Management Activities
Aerial Culling
Ground-Based Culling
Commercial Harvest
Watering Points
Mustering / Trapping
Wa...
Aerial Culling
• Cull maps produced for individual Aboriginal Land
Trusts
• These incorporated “No shoot” areas to comply ...
Firearms Training

Ground Based Shooting

• To enable rangers to participate in ground based
culling
• 17 rangers trained
...
Ground-Based Culling

• Local control activity - Low numbers
• Participation by aboriginal people
Butchery
Commercial Harvest
• 15 companies approached CLC with
commercial harvest proposals
• Only 4 commercial operators reached
t...
Watering Points
•

Installation of ‘low flow’ solar pumps,
tanks and troughs on existing bores

•

Installed at targeted s...
Mustering / Trapping
• Future local enterprises for
aboriginal people
• To learn about costs,
efforts & risks
• To reduce ...
‘CLC Camel Muster’
(April 2012)
To see this film of mustering,
go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSv-F0oCngs, from 11:4...
• 5 musters completed by rangers
• 697 camels sold (Peterborough &
Caboolture)
• Rangers gained camel handling skills
and ...
Water Monitoring
• Water monitoring booklet
developed
• Rangers were trained in water
monitoring techniques
• Rangers have...
Docker River Camel Incursion
January 2013
• 1500 camels
congregating in the
community of Docker
River during the heat of
summer 2013.
• Damage to fire hydrants,
tap...
CLC Response
•
•

•

Rangers and camel project
staff water trapped camels
Healthy animals trucked
away / unhealthy animals...
The AFCMP has assisted in…
• Changing Traditional Owners’ perceptions and
attitudes towards camel management
• Gaining Tra...
Looking forward…
• In NT, camel management now just a
standard part of looking after country
• Widespread Traditional Owne...
www.nintione.com.au
Sam Rando: 'Building capacity: Aboriginal people and camel management'. Reducing feral camel impacts across remote Austral...
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Sam Rando: 'Building capacity: Aboriginal people and camel management'. Reducing feral camel impacts across remote Australia: Australian Feral Camel Management Project Session 3 - Achievements and outcomes

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Sam Rando: 'Building capacity: Aboriginal people and camel management'. Reducing feral camel impacts across remote Australia: Australian Feral Camel Management Project Session 3 - Achievements and outcomes

  1. 1. Reducing feral camel impacts across remote Australia: Australian Feral Camel Management Project 21st November 2013, Parliament House Theatre, Canberra
  2. 2. Session Three: Achievements and Outcomes Speakers: Mark Lethbridge, Ecoknowledge Jayne Brim Box, Northern Territory Government Sam Rando, Central Land Council Karl Hampton, Ninti One Lyndee Severin, Curtin Springs Station Jan Ferguson, Ninti One
  3. 3. Building Capacity: Aboriginal People & Camel Management Sam Rando
  4. 4. Central Land Council • Statutory Authority under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 • 417,318 km² is Aboriginal Freehold Land • For over 35 years the CLC has been assisting Traditional Owners to acquire & manage their land
  5. 5. Camel Densities within the CLC Region
  6. 6. Before the Australian Feral Camel Management Project • In 2009, CLC employed a Feral Animal Education Officer (camels) to work with Aboriginal people in Central Australia • There was very little awareness of the environmental damage caused by camels • Collisions causing car accidents including fatalities • Scared to go bush for fear of camels • Concerned about camels coming into community
  7. 7. Cultural Issues • Feral animals were not viewed differently to native animals • Culling / “shoot to waste” was not culturally acceptable • Religious connections to camels (Bible story) • Western scientific approach to land management
  8. 8. Building Capacity Assisting Traditional Owners to make informed decisions about Camel Management on Aboriginal Land Building skills amongst indigenous ranger groups to perform camel management on Aboriginal Land
  9. 9. Traditional Owner Consultation & Education • Country visits for Traditional Owners to see ‘first hand’ the camel-related damage for themselves • Innumerable informal meetings with families and individuals • Use of education tools • More than 30 community meetings held
  10. 10. Changes in Attitudes • Feral camels – from benign animal to pest animal • Traditional Owners granted consent for camel management across the vast majority of Aboriginal Freehold Land. • Most of those consents included a full range of camel management activities
  11. 11. Camel Management Activities Aerial Culling Ground-Based Culling Commercial Harvest Watering Points Mustering / Trapping Water Monitoring
  12. 12. Aerial Culling • Cull maps produced for individual Aboriginal Land Trusts • These incorporated “No shoot” areas to comply with the wishes of Traditional owners and protect environmentally and culturally significant areas Since start of the AFCMP • 23 culls completed on Aboriginal Land • 63,782 camels culled on Aboriginal Land
  13. 13. Firearms Training Ground Based Shooting • To enable rangers to participate in ground based culling • 17 rangers trained • Skills applied in camel control, hunting, horse / cattle musters – wounded stock
  14. 14. Ground-Based Culling • Local control activity - Low numbers • Participation by aboriginal people
  15. 15. Butchery
  16. 16. Commercial Harvest • 15 companies approached CLC with commercial harvest proposals • Only 4 commercial operators reached the contract stage – none proceeded to harvest
  17. 17. Watering Points • Installation of ‘low flow’ solar pumps, tanks and troughs on existing bores • Installed at targeted sites to relieve pressure from camels on - Communities - Outstations - Natural waters Water points have increased CLC mustering / trapping capability •
  18. 18. Mustering / Trapping • Future local enterprises for aboriginal people • To learn about costs, efforts & risks • To reduce camel numbers in “no cull” areas
  19. 19. ‘CLC Camel Muster’ (April 2012) To see this film of mustering, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSv-F0oCngs, from 11:40 to 14:07
  20. 20. • 5 musters completed by rangers • 697 camels sold (Peterborough & Caboolture) • Rangers gained camel handling skills and mustering experience • Engaged indigenous mentor
  21. 21. Water Monitoring • Water monitoring booklet developed • Rangers were trained in water monitoring techniques • Rangers have had an ongoing role with water monitoring
  22. 22. Docker River Camel Incursion January 2013
  23. 23. • 1500 camels congregating in the community of Docker River during the heat of summer 2013. • Damage to fire hydrants, taps, pipes due to camels seeking water • Dead camels in the community
  24. 24. CLC Response • • • Rangers and camel project staff water trapped camels Healthy animals trucked away / unhealthy animals put down Eased pressure from camels on the community
  25. 25. The AFCMP has assisted in… • Changing Traditional Owners’ perceptions and attitudes towards camel management • Gaining Traditional Owner consent for camel management activities • Building the capacity of indigenous ranger groups to continue camel management • Removing 63,782 camels from Aboriginal Land • Protecting cultural and environmental assets by reducing the feral camel population • Improving safety on roads and in communities
  26. 26. Looking forward… • In NT, camel management now just a standard part of looking after country • Widespread Traditional Owner support • Without ongoing funding camel numbers will quickly increase • Journey has begun – still a long way to go
  27. 27. www.nintione.com.au

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