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The Rivers Trust Autumn Conference: Day 2 - Session 2

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The Partnership approach & assessing the benefits of catchment management. 12th & 13th September 2016 at the Rougemont Hotel, Exeter. Following the decision to leave the EU the need to come together to tackle the complex environmental problems we face such as diffuse pollution and habitat fragmentation has never been greater. This conference sets out the benefits and drawbacks of partnership working and the effectiveness of dealing with problems at a catchment scale.

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The Rivers Trust Autumn Conference: Day 2 - Session 2

  1. 1. Chaired by Damian Crilly
  2. 2. CEO, Westcountry Rivers Trust
  3. 3. Catchment Management in the lowland farmed landscape Payments for Ecosystem Services Pollutant type, scale and density Delivery – past and present Dr Laurence Couldrick - Westcountry RiversTrust
  4. 4. - Wants to improve Ecosystem Services that flow from land - Estimated cost/benefit ratio - Sold to customer & OFWAT - 65p from bill payers = £9m Buyer - SWW Intermediary - WRT - Ensure works do not degrade other services - Minimise admin costs - Monitor concept Seller - Farmer - Has a capital asset that generates Ecosystem Services - Improves the function of his asset (e.g. soil management) Payments for Ecosystem Services
  5. 5. < > Cost Benefit   Why do people change?
  6. 6. For SWW: ↑ Population + ↓ Water Supply + ↑ Pollution = ↑ Risk + ↑ Cost Understanding the buyer
  7. 7. 5370ML 2.5ML 6.25g of slug pellets contains 0.25g of Metaldehyde 13.5kg of pellets contains 537g of Metaldehyde and would be applied to 2.5ha* * http://www.getpelletwise.co.uk/dose-rate-and-calculator/ Pollutants - Non-natural (e.g. Pesticides)
  8. 8. Pollutants - Semi-natural (e.g. Nutrients) • Nutrients occur naturally in the soil as well as coming from farmed and urban areas • Devon and Cornwall have 368,000 cows • This is equivalent to 18.4 million people worth of sewage - approximately 30% of the UK
  9. 9. • Soil loss impacts water treatment presses & fisheries spawning habitats • 38% of the soils in the SouthWest are degraded • Extreme examples show single fields losing 20% of top soil during storm Desmond • Soil loss at this level (40mm in one event series) takes 800 to 1,600 years to replace Pollutants - Natural (Sediment)
  10. 10. 653 pollution events found…. Pollutant scale and density • Scale -What scale are you working • Density – Is the pollution from many sources (diffuse) or from single sources Upper Tamar - 1,200km2 Ottery - 125km2 Caudworthy - 26km2
  11. 11. SCALE (WHAT OTHER VARIABLES ARE PRESENT?) Semi-Natural(e.g.nutrient) Un-Natural(e.g.pesticide) Natural(e.g.sediment) NATURALNESS (HOW WELL DEFINED IS THE SOURCE OF THE POLLUTANT IN THE ENVIRONMENT?) Diffuse(100’sofsources) DENSITY (HOW EASY IS IT TO REMEDY ALL SOURCES?) Point(1source) Medium(10’sofsources) Understanding impact and evidence 89 farm over 76km2 60% drop £600m to treat Colour reduced by upto 15% from Mires
  12. 12. Delivery - past and present 184 projects 86km fencing Pesticide Amnesty Pesticide Switches Pesticide modelling 3D imaging
  13. 13. What are we getting?
  14. 14. Catchment Management in the lowland farmed landscape Thank you for listening Dr Laurence Couldrick - Westcountry RiversTrust
  15. 15. CEO, Devon Wildlife Trust
  16. 16. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Woodland Catchment management for water regulation and biodiversity Harry Barton Devon Wildlife Trust
  17. 17. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Woodland
  18. 18. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Lowland heath
  19. 19. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Lowland heath
  20. 20. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Wetland and riverine
  21. 21. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Wetland and riverine
  22. 22. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Post industrial - meeth 221 SSSIs: 30% in favourable condition Over 2,000 Wildlife Sites: 34% in good condition
  23. 23. www.devonwildlifetrust.org
  24. 24. A fascinating species… They can filter up to 50 litres of water per day They are one of the longest living invertebrates known. They can live for over 100 years. But… Freshwater pearl mussels on the River Torridge are not thought to have bred successfully since the 1960’s.
  25. 25. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Condition of rivers
  26. 26. Habitat Improvements
  27. 27. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Distribution of culm habitat The remaining Culm grasslands cover only 4,000ha, fragmented across 570 sites (In 1900 there were around 29,500ha)
  28. 28. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Cross section soil image?
  29. 29. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil water levels in Culm (green) vs Intensively Managed Grasslands (purple)
  30. 30. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil inversion at Vealand
  31. 31. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Scrub removal
  32. 32. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Felling conifers
  33. 33. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil inversion at Vealand
  34. 34. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil inversion at Vealand
  35. 35. www.devonwildlifetrust.org
  36. 36. www.devonwildlifetrust.org 370km 600 farmers 5,000 ha 622,000 tonnes £10 million
  37. 37. www.devonwildlifetrust.org • 3,320 swimming pools • £14.7 million marginal value
  38. 38. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil inversion at Vealand
  39. 39. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil inversion at Vealand
  40. 40. www.devonwildlifetrust.org Soil inversion at Vealand
  41. 41. www.devonwildlifetrust.org
  42. 42. www.devonwildlifetrust.org
  43. 43. UST Project Manager, South West Water
  44. 44. (Peat) Land Management in UK Upland landscapes Dr. David Smith Upstream Thinking and Environment Manager, South West Water 147
  45. 45. Uplands in the UK 148
  46. 46. Uplands: Key Services 149
  47. 47. Grouse 150
  48. 48. Heather moorland 151
  49. 49. Moorland burning 152
  50. 50. Past management to increase outputs 153
  51. 51. Forestry 154
  52. 52. 50 yrs later... 155
  53. 53. Peat extraction 156
  54. 54. Renewable energy 157
  55. 55. The state of UK peatlands 158
  56. 56. Bare peat 159
  57. 57. Water quality 160
  58. 58. Flood risk management 161
  59. 59. Restoration remedies 162
  60. 60. Re-vegetation 163
  61. 61. Ditch blocking 164
  62. 62. Ditch and gully re-profiling 165
  63. 63. Multiple projects • Holnicote Project – multi objective flood management demonstration project (Somerset) • Yorkshire Peat Partnership • SCaMP (Sustainable Catchment Management Programme – United Utilities) • North Pennines AONB Partnership – Peatscapes project • Pumlumon (Wildlife Trusts Wales / Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust) • Moors for the Future / Making Space for Water • Vyrnwy LIFE project 166
  64. 64. Policy and regulation 167
  65. 65. National coordination and support 168 The IUCN UK Peatland Programme exists to promote peatland restoration in the UK and advocates the multiple benefits of peatlands through partnerships, strong science, sound policy and effective practice. The Peatland Code is the voluntary standard for peatland restoration projects in the UK that want to be sponsored on the basis of their carbon benefits
  66. 66. Bottom up campaigning action 169
  67. 67. SWW led peatland management Exmoor Project Dartmoor Pilot project Bodmin initiatives 170
  68. 68. Most of Exmoor’s peatlands have been affected by peat- cutting, drainage, or past over-burning and grazing. - Heavily modified, dry and dominated by Molinia. 171
  69. 69. Bare Peat on Dartmoor 172
  70. 70. Typical peat and wooden block 6 weeks after restoration on Exmoor 173
  71. 71. Eroded area after restoration 33
  72. 72. •Monitoring Equipment per site: 54 dipwells, 18 temperature loggers, 60 capacitance probes, 30 mini conductivity loggers, 3 seepage meters. Restoration of Spooners: monitoring catchment, April 2013 175
  73. 73. Evidence 176
  74. 74. Future developments 177
  75. 75. Future developments and technology 178
  76. 76. Amazing is possible 179
  77. 77. Exmoor Flow Country 180
  78. 78. Head of Data, Evidence & Communications, WRT
  79. 79. Westcountry RiversTrust Bringing our rivers to lifeforthe benefit of allby protecting habitats and species,balancing land-use and reconnecting people with their localriver Rain-Charm House Kyl Cober Parc, Stoke Climsland Cornwall, PL17 8PH info@wrt.org.uk 01579 372140 www.wrt.org.uk Managing the water environment in urban landscapes Water Sensitive Urban Design
  80. 80. WATER QUALITY CULTURE & LEISURE CLIMATE REGULATION HEALTH & WELLBEING FOOD PRODUCTION FLOOD RISK / RESILIENCE SPECIES & HABITATS Westcountry Rivers Trust Ecosystem services benefit/impact ‘budgeting’
  81. 81. Amount of greenspace in an area and rate of perceived poor health Mitchell R. and Popham F. (2007) Journal of Epidemiology Community Health 61: 681-683 Effect of natural environment on health inequalities (mortality rates) Mitchell, R. and F. Popham () The Lancet 372 (9650): 1655-1660. Natural England (2009) have estimated a £2.1 billion annual savings through averted health costs if everyone in England had equal ‘good perceived and/or actual access to green space’
  82. 82. Westcountry Rivers TrustThe story so far… Legislation | Policy Help | Guidance Local Action | Partnership Strategy | Data | Evidence A journey…
  83. 83. 20162014 2015 Westcountry Rivers Trust 2010 2011 2012 2013 Flood & Water Management Act 2010 Regional Spatial Strategies (–) Housing & Planning Bill 2016Non-statutory Standards for SuDS No SABs BREXIT National Planning Policy Framework replaces PPS/PPGs Local/neighbourhood Plans Defra Urban Diffuse Pollution Strategy 2nd Ciria SuDS Manual & BeST 5x CaBA Urban Workshops Sponge 2020CaBA Pilot Catchments Catchment Restoration Fund Key Green Infrastructure Projects start CaBA Urban Group forms Catchment Partnership Action Fund
  84. 84. Westcountry Rivers Trust There are many real and perceived barriers / challenges to local partnerships delivering in urban water environments
  85. 85. WestcountryRiversTrust LOCAL COMMUNITY Local Action Practical implementation of environmental measures www GOVERNMENT BODIES Enabling Conditions LANGUAGE LISTEN PURSUADE ENGAGE TRANSLATE Protect | Maintain | Conserve Enhance | Create | Regenerate
  86. 86. Westcountry Rivers Trust CaBA Urban Working Group CHAMPIONS FOR WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN Leadership Empowerment Evidence Best Practice Case Studies Comms EngagementAmbition
  87. 87. PeterBide-PlanningAdviceforIntegratedWaterManagement LewishamCouncil&CaBAUrbanWorkingGroup–DevelopmentNearRivers
  88. 88. LOCALACTIONTOOLKIT www.urbanwater-eco.services
  89. 89. LOCALACTIONTOOLKIT www.urbanwater-eco.services
  90. 90. LOCALACTIONTOOLKIT www.urbanwater-eco.services
  91. 91. www.urbanwater-eco.services LOCALACTIONTOOLKIT
  92. 92. LOCALACTIONTOOLKIT www.urbanwater-eco.services
  93. 93. Westcountry Rivers Trust Birmingham Newcastle www.urbanwater-eco.services
  94. 94. SPONGE 2020 IEA URBAN DEMONSTRATOR
  95. 95. Westcountry RiversTrust Bringing our rivers to lifeforthe benefit of allby protecting habitats and species,balancing land-use and reconnecting people with their localriver Rain-Charm House Kyl Cober Parc, Stoke Climsland Cornwall, PL17 8PH info@wrt.org.uk 01579 372140 www.wrt.org.uk Managing the water environment in urban landscapes
  96. 96. 12th & 13th September 2016 Rougemont Hotel, Exeter
  97. 97. 12th & 13th September 2016 Rougemont Hotel, Exeter

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