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Chapter 13 - Advertising, PR and Consumer Sales Promotions

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Chapter 13 - Advertising, PR and Consumer Sales Promotions

  1. 1. 13-1<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />CHAPTER 13Module 1<br />
  2. 2. One to Many:Advertising, Public Relations, and Consumer Sales Promotions<br />Chapter Thirteen<br />
  3. 3. 13-3<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Chapter Objectives<br />Tell what advertising is, describe the major types of advertising, and discuss some of the criticisms of advertising<br />Describe the process of developing an advertising campaign and how marketers evaluate advertising<br />Explain the role of public relations and the steps in developing a public relations campaign<br />Explain what sales promotion is, and describe the different types of consumer sales promotions activities<br />
  4. 4. 13-4<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Advertising: The Image of Marketing<br />Expenditures on traditional advertising are changing<br />Marketers are diverting more money into alternative media<br />Advertising is still best way to reach mass audiences<br />
  5. 5. 13-5<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Figure 13.1Types of Advertising<br />BP Oil Spill Ad<br />Ad Council Ads<br />
  6. 6. © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />13-6<br />Product Advertising<br />The ad at left offers a typical example of product advertising<br />
  7. 7. 13-7<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Who Creates Advertising?<br />Advertising campaign: A coordinated, comprehensive plan that carries out promotion objectives and results in a series of ads placed in media over a period of time<br />Outside agencies are often retained to oversee campaigns:<br />Limited-service agency <br />Full-service agency<br />
  8. 8. 13-8<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Who Creates Advertising?<br /><ul><li>Advertising agencies employ specialists who perform a variety of functions: </li></ul>Account management<br />Creative services<br />Research and marketing services<br />Media planning<br />
  9. 9. 13-9<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />User-Generated Advertising Content: Do-it-Yourself Advertising<br />User-generated content (UGC) or consumer-generated media (CGM)Online consumer comments, opinions, advice and discussions, reviews, photos, images, videos, podcasts, webcasts, and product related stories available to other consumers<br />Must be monitored and encouraged<br />
  10. 10. 13-10<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />User-Generated Advertising Content: Crowdsourcing<br />CrowdsourcingA practice in which firms outsource marketing activities (such as selecting an ad) to a community of users<br />Consumers are great sources of ideas<br />Independent contractors are also being targeted<br />SkiUtah.com<br />
  11. 11. 13-11<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />End Module 1<br />
  12. 12. 13-12<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />CHAPTER 13Module 2<br />
  13. 13. 13-13<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Figure 13.2Steps to Develop an Advertising Campaign<br />
  14. 14. 13-14<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Figure 13.3Creative Elements of Advertising<br />
  15. 15. © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />13-15<br />Product Advertising<br />The ad at left offers a typical example of product advertising<br />
  16. 16. 10-16<br />© 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Humor Advertising<br />
  17. 17. 10-17<br />© 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Sex Appeal <br />
  18. 18. 13-18<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Develop the Advertising Campaign<br />Execution formats<br />Describe the basic structure of the message<br /> Comparison<br /> Demonstration<br /> Testimonial<br /> Slice of life<br /> Lifestyle<br />
  19. 19. 13-19<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Develop the Advertising Campaign<br />Creative tactics and techniques<br />Animation and art<br />Celebrities<br />Music, jingles, and slogans<br />Sporacle.com<br />
  20. 20. 13-20<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />End Module 2<br />
  21. 21. 13-21<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />CHAPTER 13Module 3<br />
  22. 22. 13-22<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Develop the Advertising Campaign<br />Step 4: Pretest what the ads will say<br />Pretesting:Research method that seeks to minimize mistakes by getting consumer reactions to ad messages before they appear in the media<br />Eye Tracking Example<br />
  23. 23. 13-23<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Develop the Advertising Campaign<br /><ul><li>Step 5: Choose the media type(s) and media schedule</li></ul>Media planning:The process of developing media objectives, strategies, and tactics<br />
  24. 24. 13-24<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Where To Say It: Traditional Media<br /><ul><li>Each of the traditional media has pros and cons</li></ul>Television<br />Radio<br />Newspapers<br />Magazines<br />
  25. 25. 13-25<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Where To Say It: Digital Media<br />Digital media takes many forms<br />Own, paid, and earned media <br />Website advertising<br />Banners and buttons<br />Pop-up ads<br />Search engines and directory listings<br />E-mail advertising<br />Mobile advertising<br />Video sharing<br />
  26. 26. 13-26<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Where To Say It: Branded Entertainment<br />Branded entertainmenta form of advertising in which marketers integrate products into entertainment venues<br />Product placements<br />Advergaming<br />
  27. 27. 13-27<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Where To Say It: Support Media<br /><ul><li>Support media reaches people who are not reached by mass media advertising </li></ul>Directories<br />Out-of-home media<br />Place-based media<br />RFID technology<br />Renault’s use of RFID<br />
  28. 28. 13-28<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Media Scheduling: How Often To Say It<br /><ul><li>Typical advertising patterns:</li></ul>Continuous schedule<br /><ul><li>Wearout may be a problem</li></ul>Pulsing schedule<br />Flighting schedule <br />
  29. 29. 13-29<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Media Scheduling<br />
  30. 30. 13-30<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Develop the Advertising Campaign<br />Step 6: Evaluate the advertising<br />Posttesting: Research on consumers’ responses to advertising they have seen or heard<br />Unaided recall <br />Aided recall <br />Attitudinal measures<br />
  31. 31. 13-31<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />End Module 3<br />
  32. 32. 13-32<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />CHAPTER 13Module 4<br />
  33. 33. 13-33<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Public Relations<br />Public relations (PR):Communication function that seeks to build good relationships with an organization’s publics<br />Proactive PR activities stem from a firm’s marketing objectives<br />Publicity<br />PR is critical when a firm’s image is at risk due to negative publicity<br />
  34. 34. 13-34<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Figure 13.5Objectives and Tactics of Public Relations<br />
  35. 35. 13-35<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Objectives of Public Relations<br />Typical objectives include:<br />Introduce new products to retailers<br />Introduce new products to consumers<br />Influence government legislation<br />Enhance the image of a firm<br />Provide advice and counsel<br />Enhance the image of a city, region, or country<br />Manage a crisis<br />Call attention to a firm’s involvement with the community<br />
  36. 36. 13-36<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Public Relations Tactics<br />Press releases (various forms)<br />Internal PR<br />Investor relations<br />Lobbying <br />Speech writing<br />Corporate identity<br />Media relations<br />Sponsorships<br />Special events<br />Guerilla marketing<br />
  37. 37. © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />13-37<br />Sponsorships<br />McDonald’s has sponsored the FIFA World cup since 1994 in restaurants worldwide<br />
  38. 38. 13-38<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Sales Promotion<br />Sales promotions:Programs designed to build interest in or encourage purchase of a product during a specified period of time<br />Deliver short-term sales results<br />Can target end consumers, channel partners, and/or employees<br />
  39. 39. 13-39<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />
  40. 40. 13-40<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Figure 13.6Types of Consumer Sales Promotion<br />
  41. 41. 13-41<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Table 13.4Consumer Sales Promotion Techniques: A Sampler<br />
  42. 42. 13-42<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />Table 13.4Consumer Sales Promotion Techniques: A Sampler<br />
  43. 43. © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />13-43<br />Sampling<br />The Weinermobile draws attention to Oscar Mayer’s sampling efforts<br />
  44. 44. End Chapter 13<br />10-44<br />© 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />
  45. 45. 13-45<br />© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice-Hall.<br />All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America<br />

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