Mentorship in Emergency Medicine:
From Near-Peers to Tiers
Dr. Sarah Ronan-Bentle, MD
Dr. Robbie Paulsen, MD
Dr. Nicholas ...
Mentorship in Emergency Medicine:
From Near-Peers to Tiers
Resident and Faculty Panel:
Dr. Laura Espy Bell
Dr. Matthew Stu...
Objectives
 Describe the formation, organization, structure
and function of group mentorship programs.
 Describe 2 such ...
Background
 Mentorship is a reciprocal relationship between
an advanced career incumbent (mentor) and a
beginner (mentee)...
Background
 Mentorship is intended to promote professional
development and career advancement.
 Up to 40% of medical stu...
Mentorship Models
 Classic one-to-one mentoring between
mentor and mentee.
 Group mentoring: Small group of mentees
supe...
Medical Student Mentorship
 2 Reviews showed 9-14 published mentoring
programs for medical students and 7 for
doctors.
 ...
Gender In Mentorship: Background
 Approximately 50% of U.S. medical students are
now female, yet gender inequality exists...
Group Mentorship
 Can we bridge the gap between medical students
and resident?
 Can we improve mentorship of all genders...
Faculty
Residents Students
Compared to faculty-student pairs, a near-peer
mentoring program should:
 Be more casual
 Provide a real glimpse into re...
Near-Peer Program Aims
Primary
 Provide a realistic
understanding of EM
residency
 Guide fourth-year
students through th...
Curricular Design
Resident Mentors
 Volunteer Recruitment
 PGY 2 – PGY 4
Eligible
 E-Mail Orientation
 Resident Initia...
Curricular Design
Student Mentees
 July – October
 Home & Away
Rotators
 “Opt Out” Participation
Curricular Design
 Expectations
 At least one face-
to-face meeting
during clinical
rotation
 Continued regular
contact...
Program Impact
Student Mentees
 Casual and open
relationship
 Decreased anxiety
 High personal
satisfaction
Resident Me...
Advanced Topics in Emergency Medicine
Kman, NE., et al. “Advanced topics in emergency medicine: curriculum development and...
Grants and Programming
Grants and Programming
The OSU Tiered Mentorship Model
 Each tiered group consists of at least one faculty
member, one resident, one ATEM studen...
The OSU Tiered Mentorship Model
 Introductory meeting at EMIG: Introductory
questionnaire sent out immediately after to b...
Clinical Requirement
 EMIG has a shadowing system set up where
student can shadow EM faculty member.
 Students do one sh...
The OSU Tiered Mentorship Program
24
“I have a mentor from the Department of Emergency
Medicine (EM)”
Gender in Mentorship Study
• 12 groups were formed in 2012-2013.
• 3 of the 12 groups were comprised solely of females
• 2...
26
•Majority
disagreed with
statement that the
gender
distribution of
their group
contributed to
their experience.
“The ge...
27
• Majority (86.4%)
disagreed that they
preferred faculty
mentor of their
gender.
• Majority disagreed
that they preferr...
Gender in Mentorship Conclusions
 Tiered-mentorship group structure allows
students to identify a faculty member mentor,
...
Pitfalls and Questions for the Panel
 Assigning Mentors
 Group Size
 Authority Gradient
 Does gender matter?
29
References
 Kman NE, Bernard AB, Khandelwal S, Nagel RW, Martin
DR. A Tiered Mentorship Program Improves Number of
Studen...
References
 Medical School Based Mentoring Programs. AAMC 2010.
 Frei et al. Mentoring programs for medical students – a...
Mentorship in Emergency Medicine:
From Near-Peers to Tiers
Resident and Faculty Panel:
Dr. Laura Espy Bell
Dr. Matthew Stu...
Group Mentorship Programs in Emergency Medicine
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Group Mentorship Programs in Emergency Medicine

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Group Mentorship Programs in Emergency Medicine

  1. 1. Mentorship in Emergency Medicine: From Near-Peers to Tiers Dr. Sarah Ronan-Bentle, MD Dr. Robbie Paulsen, MD Dr. Nicholas Kman, MD @drnickkman
  2. 2. Mentorship in Emergency Medicine: From Near-Peers to Tiers Resident and Faculty Panel: Dr. Laura Espy Bell Dr. Matthew Stull With Dr. Robbie Paulsen
  3. 3. Objectives  Describe the formation, organization, structure and function of group mentorship programs.  Describe 2 such programs who approach this model in slightly different forms.  Introduce the role of gender in medical student mentoring (one institutions experience).  Divulge challenges and limitations to group mentorship programs.
  4. 4. Background  Mentorship is a reciprocal relationship between an advanced career incumbent (mentor) and a beginner (mentee).  A mentor should empower and encourage the mentee, role model, build a professional network, and assist in mentee's personal development.  A mentee should set agendas, follow through, accept criticism, and be able to assess performance and benefits derived from relationship. Frei et al., Mentoring programs for medical students – a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008 BMC Medical Education 2010,10:32.
  5. 5. Background  Mentorship is intended to promote professional development and career advancement.  Up to 40% of medical students cannot identify a mentor.  One of the barriers of the mentorship relationship, “finding a suitable mentor”, can be solved by starting a mentorship program.
  6. 6. Mentorship Models  Classic one-to-one mentoring between mentor and mentee.  Group mentoring: Small group of mentees supervised by a mentor  The Multiple-Mentor Experience Model: Individual or group mentoring with a number of mentors  Peer mentoring and mentoring among co- equals. 6 B. Buddeberg-Fischer & K.-D. Herta. Formal mentoring programmes for medical students and doctors – a review of the Medline literature. Medical Teacher, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2006, pp. 248–257.
  7. 7. Medical Student Mentorship  2 Reviews showed 9-14 published mentoring programs for medical students and 7 for doctors.  Programs pursued different goals and employed different structures.  % of women among the mentors is given in only one of the programs.  Conclude that career development should be stage-specific and goal-oriented. 7 Frei et al., Mentoring programs for medical students – a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008 BMC Medical Education 2010,10:32.
  8. 8. Gender In Mentorship: Background  Approximately 50% of U.S. medical students are now female, yet gender inequality exists in many medical specialties  Studies have indicated that one of the primary barriers to the advancement of women in medicine is lack of effective mentors.  Female trainees are less likely to identify a mentor and mentorship programs for women are rare. 8 Welch JL, Jimenez HL, Walthall J, and Allen SE(2012) The Women in Emergency Medicine Mentoring Program: An Innovative Approach to Mentoring. Journal of Graduate Medical Education: September 2012, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 362-366.
  9. 9. Group Mentorship  Can we bridge the gap between medical students and resident?  Can we improve mentorship of all genders?  Does assigning a mentor really work? 9
  10. 10. Faculty Residents Students
  11. 11. Compared to faculty-student pairs, a near-peer mentoring program should:  Be more casual  Provide a real glimpse into resident life  Improve skills as a mentor and mentee for both parties Near-Peer Mentorship
  12. 12. Near-Peer Program Aims Primary  Provide a realistic understanding of EM residency  Guide fourth-year students through the residency match Secondary  Augment emergency medicine residents’ skills as effective mentors
  13. 13. Curricular Design Resident Mentors  Volunteer Recruitment  PGY 2 – PGY 4 Eligible  E-Mail Orientation  Resident Initiated
  14. 14. Curricular Design Student Mentees  July – October  Home & Away Rotators  “Opt Out” Participation
  15. 15. Curricular Design  Expectations  At least one face- to-face meeting during clinical rotation  Continued regular contact  Mentorship Guidance  Follow-up e-mails with mentoring tips  Application deadline reminders
  16. 16. Program Impact Student Mentees  Casual and open relationship  Decreased anxiety  High personal satisfaction Resident Mentors  Enhanced mentoring skills  Insights on receiving future mentorship
  17. 17. Advanced Topics in Emergency Medicine Kman, NE., et al. “Advanced topics in emergency medicine: curriculum development and initial evaluation.” Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, v. 12 issue 4, 2011, p. 543-50.
  18. 18. Grants and Programming
  19. 19. Grants and Programming
  20. 20. The OSU Tiered Mentorship Model  Each tiered group consists of at least one faculty member, one resident, one ATEM student, and one or more junior level medical students (MS1- 3) interested in EM.  11 to 13 total groups.  Students paired with mentors based on EM interest or pre-existing relationship. Kman NE, Bernard AB, Khandelwal S, Nagel RW, Martin DR. A Tiered Mentorship Program Improves Number of Students With an Identified Mentor. Teaching and Learning in Medicine. Vol. 25, Iss. 4, 2013.
  21. 21. The OSU Tiered Mentorship Model  Introductory meeting at EMIG: Introductory questionnaire sent out immediately after to begin roster of groups.  1st Small Group Meeting: Introductions, importance of mentorship and academic goals.  2nd Small Group Meeting: Lifestyle, hours and social aspects of their occupation.  EMIG/ATEM Panel Discussion: ATEM students reflect on experience with the Match.
  22. 22. Clinical Requirement  EMIG has a shadowing system set up where student can shadow EM faculty member.  Students do one shadowing shift with their faculty mentor and one with their resident mentor.
  23. 23. The OSU Tiered Mentorship Program 24 “I have a mentor from the Department of Emergency Medicine (EM)”
  24. 24. Gender in Mentorship Study • 12 groups were formed in 2012-2013. • 3 of the 12 groups were comprised solely of females • 2 of the groups were male exclusive. • The remaining, mixed gender groups were formed based on common interest and included both males and females. 25
  25. 25. 26 •Majority disagreed with statement that the gender distribution of their group contributed to their experience. “The gender distribution of my group contributed to my experience” Group Composition The OSU Tiered Mentorship Program
  26. 26. 27 • Majority (86.4%) disagreed that they preferred faculty mentor of their gender. • Majority disagreed that they preferred a group composed of single gender. “I would prefer to be part of a group composed of only members of my gender” Group Composition The OSU Tiered Mentorship Program
  27. 27. Gender in Mentorship Conclusions  Tiered-mentorship group structure allows students to identify a faculty member mentor, the gender of mentor and gender make-up of the group is less important.  The primary role of gender was not perceived to be of value to students.  Our findings led to the establishment of all mixed gender groups for this academic year. 28
  28. 28. Pitfalls and Questions for the Panel  Assigning Mentors  Group Size  Authority Gradient  Does gender matter? 29
  29. 29. References  Kman NE, Bernard AB, Khandelwal S, Nagel RW, Martin DR. A Tiered Mentorship Program Improves Number of Students With an Identified Mentor. Teaching and Learning in Medicine. Vol. 25, Iss. 4, 2013.  Reisman AB, Gross CP. “Gender differences in the ability to identify a mentor at morning report: a multi-institutional survey.” Teach Learn Med. 2002 Fall; 14(4):236-9.  Welch JL, Jimenez HL, Walthall J, and Allen SE(2012) The Women in Emergency Medicine Mentoring Program: An Innovative Approach to Mentoring. Journal of Graduate Medical Education: September 2012, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 362-366. 30
  30. 30. References  Medical School Based Mentoring Programs. AAMC 2010.  Frei et al. Mentoring programs for medical students – a review of the PubMed literature 2000 – 2008. BMC Medical Education 2010, 10:32.  B. Buddeberg-Fischer & K.-D. Herta. Formal mentoring programmes for medical students and doctors – a review of the Medline literature. Medical Teacher, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2006, pp. 248–257. 31
  31. 31. Mentorship in Emergency Medicine: From Near-Peers to Tiers Resident and Faculty Panel: Dr. Laura Espy Bell Dr. Matthew Stull With Dr. Robbie Paulsen

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