Uwc connectivism seminar 22 aug2012-keynote

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The outline of this presentation on Connectivism presented at the Teaching and Learning Research Series at the University of Western Cape (UWC) in South Africa addresses the following questions: What is it? Why is it? How is it? and Whose is it?

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  • A human being is so connected that a single source of information is inadequate to meet all the information needs. \n
  • The 21st century education is more about engagement in authentic connections and collaboration. The education 4.0 has subsumed the traditional education systems (education 1.0), use of internet as a place to go for instant access to information (Education 2.0), and web-based interactions with online users (Education 3.0).\n
  • The connectedness enabled by the technologies has led to a new phenomenon of crowdsourcing i.e. anyone with a problem can now ask the crowd for answers. The need to know specific experts is dissipating as there are experts out in the cloud willing to share their expertise.\n
  • The power of the social networking, for example, in mobilising riots or political campaigns has been well documented. These authentic activities have created resources which are being adapted for teaching at many higher education institutions.\n
  • The general argument is that there is knowledge out the world than an individual can possibly hold in their own heads. The challenge today finding effective ways of tapping into that knowledge. This has huge ramifications for education. How do we scope the curriculum, what can we teach which students cannot learn on their own? what can’t you teach yourself these days?\n
  • In today connected world, new skills are required to survive. The skills required should involve acquiring the ability to make sense of these connection, exploiting these connections, knowing which ones are worth nurturing and maintaining at different stages of life or problem spaces.\n
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  • It is against the afore said background, that George Siemens’ Connectivism theory becomes useful for us to examine. In this slide, I describe the key principles of Connectivism. \n
  • This image illustrates the point that people connect with information and need not know the person. The individual may filter and delete what they consider ‘bad data’ but remember “one man’s poison is another man’s meat’. \n
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  • These students are using on a group project which involves finding podcasts from the web that best supports their position on an assigned task. Through this process, students are interacting with experts around the world using authentic podcasts, evaluating the resources (making judgements), deleting what they consider irrelevant.\n
  • Students working is distributed environment, chatting about a twitee just received from their idolised celebrity (left), listening to a lecture podcast from an Open Educational Resource (OER) repository (middle), and posting comments on the course Facebook group\n
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  • Uwc connectivism seminar 22 aug2012-keynote

    1. 1. Connectivism • Dick Ng’ambi • Centre for educational technology • University of Cape TownPresented at the UWC Teaching & Learning seminar series: theories and approaches to T&L on 22nd August, 2012
    2. 2. Outline• What is it?• How is it?• Why is it?• Whom is it?
    3. 3. Source: http://socialmediatoday.com/kanter/258877/quora-yet-another-social-network-yasn-or-something-different
    4. 4. Education trajectory Authentic human connections & Interact with web collaboration & other online Internet, a Education 4.0 users place to go for instant access to information Education 3.0 Education 3.0 Education 2.0 Education 2.0 Education 2.0TraditionalEducation 1.0 Education 1.0 Education 1.0 Education 1.0
    5. 5. Crowdsourcing Image Source: http://www.greenbookblog.org/2010/11/05/crowdsourcing%E2%80%A6counterintuitive/• Problems are broadcast to an unknown group of solvers in the form of an open call for solutions
    6. 6. Image source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/greenslade+uk/london-riots
    7. 7. Wisdom of CrowdsImage source: http://www.nscorp.com/nscportal/nscorp/Employees/Diversity/Diversity_in_Action/fitzgerald.html
    8. 8. Source: http://socialnetworksales.net/
    9. 9. Complex network (twitter follower-graph)Source: http://www.fernfachhochschule.ch/ffhs/afe/lws/forschung/research/view?set_language=en
    10. 10. Why is it? Facilitating continual learning is a process of nurturing & maintaining connections Learning = process of connectingspecialised nodes or info sources Ability to see connections between fields, ideas and concepts is a core skillCapacity to know more ismore critical than what is currently known Connectivism
    11. 11. Learning, how? • Learning is the creation and removal of connections between the entities, or the adjustment of the strengths of those connections. A learning theory is, literally, a theory describing howSource: Stephen Downes (2012) ebook on Connectivism and Connective Knowledge: Essays on meaning and learning networks
    12. 12. • Learning is a connection-making process George Siemens, 2012: Available at: http://www.connectivism.ca/
    13. 13. Theory, what? Verhagen (2006; as cited in Veletsianos, 2010), “…connectivism is more a theoryof curriculum (specifying what thegoal of education should be and the way students should learn in that curriculum) than a theory of learning” (p. 35).
    14. 14. Learner-driven, what?• Anderson (2008), it helps people to understand that learning is about making connections with ideas, facts, people, and communities.• Marcum (2006), it goes beyond behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and learner-centered approaches to a learner-driven approach.
    15. 15. Danny Goodwin, May 25, 2011
    16. 16. Source: http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/facilities/us.archives.html
    17. 17. Source: http://www.activemedia.com/services/internet-marketing-services/mobile-phone-marketing-services
    18. 18. Connections for what?• Connectivism could be explained as a learning theory that encourages students to use their connections to further their learning in a field of study that is interesting to them. Source: http://mrbrenlea.wordpress.com/2011/09/11/connectivism/
    19. 19. Challenges• that people, Connectivism assumes information, and knowledge do not function autonomously, but are individually connected by webs of context, culture, and pre-connection to others (Terry & Terry, 2010)• learners and learning Both the networks exist all at the same time. Did learners or learning networks come first?
    20. 20. Connectivism as a learning theory
    21. 21. Questions & Discussion Contact details: Dick Ng’ambi, PhD. dick.ngambi@uct.ac.za

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