Developing professional practice ch3

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Developing professional practice ch3

  1. 1. Presentation Title Example Author: Simon Haslett 15th October 2009 Developing professional practice in HE Chapter 3 Planning for Learning in HE
  2. 2. Chapter 3: Planning for Learning in HE 1. Objectives 2. Reflection: who influences the planning process? 3. Writing learning outcomes 4. Developing a learning and teaching strategy 5. Constructive alignment a) The basis of constructive alignment 6. Evaluating constructive alignment a) The dynamic of constructive alignment 7. Bibliography
  3. 3. 1: Chapter objectives • consider the range of influences on course planning and design • develop own practice in writing learning outcomes • review your learning and teaching strategy and make recommendations for improvement • evaluate the concept of “constructive alignment” in relation to your own modules
  4. 4. 2: Reflection: who influences the planning process? • There are a number of stakeholders in the planning process in HE including: – Students – Academic staff – The HE Institution – Professional bodies (who may endorse qualifications) – Quality Assurance bodies e.g. in the UK this is the QAA www.qaa.ac.uk • Reflect upon how (if at all) does this affect our planning?
  5. 5. 3: Writing learning outcomes • Visit the library room to read Moon, J. (2002) chapter 5: Writing and using aims and learning outcomes • Consider: – what are the advantages and limitations of learning outcomes?
  6. 6. 4: Developing a learning and teaching strategy • What’s your teaching and learning strategy (on a course you are familiar with)? • Is it written down? • Do you share it with students? • Does it reflect interests and concerns of the various groups highlighted in slide 2? • Review the example Learning and Teaching Strategy DOC07
  7. 7. 5: Constructive alignment • Consider the relationship between learning outcomes, learning and teaching activities, and assessment • Then visit the library room to read: Biggs & Tang (2007) chapter 4: Using constructive alignment • Do Biggs and Tang offer you any new insights?
  8. 8. 5a: The basis of constructive alignment
  9. 9. 6: Evaluating constructive alignment • Look at the document Constructive Alignment DOC08 • Review the relationship between learning outcomes, activities and assessment tasks in the four example modules • The three elements are not all well aligned: can you improve constructive alignment in each case? • Use the blank table DOC 09 to record and analyse a module you teach on – are there any elements you need/would like to develop? • This might be an area for you to develop further
  10. 10. 6a: The dynamic of constructive alignment
  11. 11. 7: Bibliography • BIGGS, J & TANG, C. (2007) Teaching for Quality Learning at University 3rd Edition. Maidenhead: Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press • HOUGHTON, W. (2004) Constructive alignment and why it is important to the learning process [online] http://engsc.ac.uk/er/theory/constructive_alignment.asp Accessed: 20 December 2009 • MOON, J. (2002) The Module and Programme Development Handbook London. Kogan Page

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