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Syracuse University S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications fall 2007 Vol. 19 No. 3
Syracuse University S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications fall 2007 Vol. 19 No. 3     Dean                        ...
Newhouse III is now open. Students are finding their      •	Scholarship assistance. We are increasingly             cozies...
By Carol L. Boll2
With temperatures hovering near 80 degrees and sunny skiesoverhead, September 19 was a made-to-order day for the dedicatio...
justice and witness the grand     Inc., offered remarks on be-       and without bias. Newhouse    opening of SU’s newest ...
Construction                                                                                                        Kudos ...
Mark Obbie                  Paula Madison    “Wrapped” in the words of the First Amendment,         	 Awards. He also has ...
Scholarship                                                                         Free SpeechA First Amendment          ...
Newhouse in New York    conversations draw communication leaders    By Kathleen Haley    For the past eight years, the New...
By Carol L. Bollback to school                                       PR professionals thrive in the classroom—and on the j...
Glenn Rigberg, manager of Rigberg Entertainment,                                                                          ...
Nhouse Productions allows students to show off their skills                Think of it as Newhouse’s answer to YouTube. Nh...
12
Military Photojournalists Reveal the                           of Syracuse’s South side    by Christy Perry    In a semest...
mock crisis offers real-world training     By Kevin Morrow                                        quarrel, the suspect pan...
“War Surrounds Us” Wins Accolades                                encouraging the free practice of journalism, stimulating ...
Mirror Awards Competition a success                                                                                       ...
Ivory Tower Half Hour goes statewide                                                                                      ...
By Christy Perry     Flocke Wins                            Shoemaker Named                                             Ke...
Scholarship...                                                                             continued from page 7          ...
Lauren Pomerantz ’03     revealing the Power of the Lens     By Agatha Lutoborski     During her undergraduate studies at ...
Images of Guatemala and India by Lauren Pomerantzshowed her photographs to members of hertemple. Inspired by her work, the...
Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007
Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007
Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007
Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007
Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007
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Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007

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Newhouse Network magazine, fall 2007

  1. 1. Syracuse University S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications fall 2007 Vol. 19 No. 3
  2. 2. Syracuse University S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications fall 2007 Vol. 19 No. 3 Dean in this issue: David M. Rubin Executive Editor Dean’s Column 1 Wendy S. Loughlin G’95 Newhouse III Dedication 2 Editor Carol L. Boll Year of the First Amendment 6 2 Contributors Jean Brooks First Amendment Scholars Program 7 Rob Enslin Shavon S. Greene ’10 Newhouse in New York 8 Kathleen Haley ’92 Jason Levy G’07 Agatha Lutoborski ’08 Executive Education 9 Kevin Morrow Christy Perry TRF Semester Study 10 George Thomas G’07 Nhouse Productions 11 Photography 7 Steve Sartori Images of the South Side 12 Graphic Design Elizabeth Percival Emergency Preparedness 14 Assistant Dean of External Relations Student News 15 Lynn A. Vanderhoek ’89 Mirror Awards 16 Office of External Relations Ivory Tower Goes Statewide 17 315-443-5711 Web Site newhouse.syr.edu 8 Envi Magazine Faculty Briefs 17 18 On the cover: Newhouse III “ribbon-cutting” Lauren Pomerantz ’03 20 participants (from left) Stephanie Rivetz ’08, S.I. Newhouse Jr., William Kagler ’51 22 Victoria Newhouse, U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., Chancellor Class Notes 23 Nancy Cantor, Donald Newhouse, Susan Newhouse, and Dean David Rubin 9
  3. 3. Newhouse III is now open. Students are finding their • Scholarship assistance. We are increasingly coziest hideaways for studying and socializing. The competing for students with Ivy League schools favorite food items at Food.com are becoming clear. and others with much larger endowments. To Faculty members and students are learning their way remain competitive for these students, we need around the new experimental newsroom. It’s time more endowed scholarships. now to catch our collective breath, take a week off, • An umbrella center for teaching and scholarship on and then look to the future. popular culture. In its various schools and colleges, That is precisely what the Newhouse family and Syracuse has the building blocks to be a leading foundation have done. They recognize that a building institution in the field of popular culture. New campaign can sap the energies (not to mention the donors could bring these disparate parts together wallets) of the school’s most loyal donors and in the SU Center on Popular Culture, which wouldDean’s Column volunteers. So to keep up the momentum built during hire visiting faculty, host speakers, stage symposia, the campaign, and to help the school plan for the publish books, sponsor screenings, and launch new future, the family announced November 2 that it interdisciplinary degree programs. had made a challenge grant of $10 million to the • A small Los Angeles campus. Many schools and Newhouse School, matching our fund raising two to colleges at SU would like to send students to L.A. one. If the school raises the full challenge amount for internships. But these students also need arts of $5 million, this will create resources in the and sciences coursework to maintain normal amount of $15 million. Why the November 2 date progress toward their degrees. We need a small for the announcement? Because that is the day the campus where they can take these courses. University publicly announced its new $1 billion fund- • Enhancements to Newhouse Plaza. Potted trees raising campaign, of which this gift will be a part. As and benches strategically placed around the plaza one of Syracuse’s flagship schools, the Newhouse would increase its appeal as a public meeting School will play a key role in this campaign. space. If we succeed with this challenge grant, it will serve as a stimulus to the school’s new dean to In Newhouse III, we have an architectural gem. continue the fund-raising momentum, and it will It provides students with many nesting places provide funds to support his or her new initiatives. and opens up much new learning space. Like the (The search for my successor is under way, with the teaching and scholarship that occur daily throughout new dean expected to take the reins July 1, 2008.) Newhouse, this is a building that will stand the test of While I think it is a bit cheeky for an outgoing dean time, and of which we can all be immensely proud. to suggest needs and goals to his successor, I think there are a few areas this new fund could address. • Updating/remodeling of Studios A and B in Newhouse II. Both need to be brought into the digital and high-definition age. David M. Rubin Dean 1
  4. 4. By Carol L. Boll2
  5. 5. With temperatures hovering near 80 degrees and sunny skiesoverhead, September 19 was a made-to-order day for the dedicationof Newhouse III—and a fitting bookend to the Newhouse I dedication43 years earlier. At that dedication, S.I. Newhouse spoke of his desireto establish a three-building, world-class communications complexat Syracuse University.The dedication of Newhouse “The new buildingIII marked the culmination of that we dedicate properlythat dream, and an estimated celebrates the words of the2,500 people from the Univer- First Amendment,” Robertssity and Syracuse communi- told the chapel audience,ties joined S.I. Newhouse Jr., which included suchDonald Newhouse, their fami- notable alumni as Pulitzerlies, and guests to observe Prize-winning journalistthe historic occasion. While William Safire ’51, H’78 andall eyes at the 1964 ceremony sportscaster Mike Tirico ’88.were on President Lyndon B. “They literally surround andJohnson—who used the event envelop those who will studyto deliver what would become and work in the building. Butknown as the Gulf of Tonkin to those people, I would offerspeech—the headliner this this caution: Do not think for Donald Newhouse (left) and S.I. Newhouse Jr.time around was Chief Justice a moment that those wordsof the United States John G. alone will protect you. …Roberts Jr. Without an independent courts have given the First independence, there can In a speech before a judiciary to give substance to Amendment’s inspirational be little doubt that thecapacity crowd at Hendricks the constitutional text as law, words true vitality,” he said. First Amendment would beChapel preceding the ribbon- the words are nothing but “Many of the decisions doing the first victim should thecutting ceremony, Roberts empty promises.” so protect unpopular speech. independence of our judiciarytraced the historical sig- Roberts said while It is difficult to suppose that be curtailed.”nificance of constitutionally the First Amendment was those decisions would have At the conclusion of theguaranteed freedom of speech created to protect all speech, come out the same way if speech, the audience, ledbut cautioned against viewing an independent judiciary— the judges rendering them by the Syracuse Universitythe First Amendment in isola- insulated from politics and were subject to political Ancient Drum Corps,tion. Without an independent public criticism by lifetime or popular pressure. … processed to the Newhousejudiciary, he said, such rights tenure—safeguards it in Whatever particular decision complex, where a crowdwould mean little. a way popularly elected or decisions might prompt stood waiting in the sun to officials cannot. “The specific attack on judicial catch a glimpse of the chief 3
  6. 6. justice and witness the grand Inc., offered remarks on be- and without bias. Newhouse opening of SU’s newest half of the Newhouse family. III embodies the ideal of building. In his remarks, He recalled the 1964 dedica- freedom of the press.” Newhouse Dean David M. tion ceremony and his father’s Newhouse professor Rubin thanked all involved pride in the I.M. Pei-designed Jay Wright, representing the with the construction project, Newhouse I. Since then, he faculty, said the dedication most notably the Newhouse said, “the School of Public ceremony was all about the family and foundation, whose Communications has become students. “You’re going to $15 million gift launched an enormous success, and it have, I hope, many wonder- the construction project. “In is, today, one of the glories of ful memories here,” he said. November of 2005, we broke Syracuse University.” Citing “One of them will be that you ground,” Rubin said. “Now, the words of the First Amend- will forever be able to say, ‘I in record time, we have this ment that are etched 6 feet saw the chief justice of the United States, who cared enough about the future of “You [students] are going to have, I hope, communications education and freedom of expression to many wonderful memories here. One of come here and share the mo- ment.’ And don’t forget it was them will be that you will forever be able a beautiful day.” Other speakers included to say ‘I saw the chief justice of the United Stephanie Rivetz ’08; Chan- cellor Nancy Cantor; and Chief States, who cared enough about the future Justice Roberts, who urged responsibility in exercising of communications education and freedom the right to free speech and ended with a caution: “So of expression to come here and share much of your individual lives and the sacrifices of fam- the moment.’ And don’t forget it was a ily and friends have been devoted to ensuring that you beautiful day.” have the opportunity to learn and exercise those rights. —Professor Jay Wright My message to you is very simple: Don’t blow it.” magnificent building. I think high into the glass façade of With scissors in hand, you will agree it was well Newhouse III, he said, “Stu- the speakers cut through worth the wait. It is a true dents who come to this school a “ribbon” of newsprint to work of art that solves all the will educate themselves to officially open the 74,000- problems we posed to the be practitioners in the first square-foot building two architects and changes the principle of the Bill of Rights. years after the University character of this side of the They will come here to learn broke ground for the project. campus. We can’t wait to live how to speak, how to seek the A reception and tours of New- in it.” truth, with intelligence, care, house III followed. S.I. Newhouse Jr., chair- and fearlessness—and how For more on Dedication U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. (above) speaks at Hendricks man of Advance Publications to express the truth clearly Chapel. Visitors fill Newhouse III for an open house following Day activities, go to newhouse.syr.edu/nh3. the dedication ceremony.4
  7. 7. Construction Kudos Newhouse III received a Best of 2007 award from New York Construction magazine. The award is part of an annualBuilding for a New Era competition recognizing the best construction projects in New York, New Jersey, andIn an age of ever-expanding computer and digital capabilities, cable television, the Internet, Connecticut, as determinedand cellular and satellite communications, Newhouse III was built to meet the increasingly by a jury of industry leaders.critical technological needs of students planning to pursue a career in communications. It also Out of more than 100was designed to foster collaboration among students, faculty, and guests by providing natural submissions, a total of 28gathering places. Among the building’s highlights: projects were recognized• Center for Digital Convergence Suite. • Executive Education Suite. This suite serves in 17 different categories. Co-directed by Newhouse and School of the school’s independent study degree Newhouse III won first place Information Studies faculty, the center program in communications management. in the higher education promotes research on and experimentation • Expanded Career Development Center. New construction category. with media convergence in an effort to additions to the center include a bank of Eligible projects had understand the future of digital media. computers linking students to a database of to have been completed• Collaborative Media Room. This space, more than 3,800 alumni who can serve as between November 1, 2006, functioning as a newsroom, is linked resources for internships, job leads, or career and September 30, 2007. electronically to several spaces in Newhouse I advice. New York City-based and II, including the editing suites, studios, • Food.com. This dining area serves as a architecture firm Polshek and broadcast journalism and Macintosh labs. community center and an informal gathering Partnership Architects• Barney Light Center for Inquiry, Innovation, spot for students and faculty. designed and constructed and Imagination. The center allows students Newhouse III. Syracuse- and faculty to gather, process, and present For more information on Newhouse III and based construction firm data for research related to coursework or to dedication day activities, go to www.newhouse. J.D. Taylor Construction Corp. enterprise projects. syr.edu. managed the project. Polshek• Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium. Named for Partnership submitted Newhouse alumna and SU Trustee Joyce the building project for Hergenhan ’63, the auditorium seats 350 and consideration in the provides space for guest lectures, conferences, competition. student activities and classes. 5
  8. 8. Mark Obbie Paula Madison “Wrapped” in the words of the First Amendment, Awards. He also has been honored as the • Photojournalist Joe McNally ’03, who etched in letters 6 feet high on its windows, National Sportswriters and Sportscasters conducted a workshop for photographers. Newhouse III serves as a powerful reminder to Association Sportscaster of the Year a record Described by American Photo magazine as students and visitors alike that the First Amend- eight times. “perhaps the most versatile photojournalist ment was written not only for journalists, but also • “Religious Freedoms Under the First working today,” McNally is a recipient of to guarantee its five protections for all citizens. Amendment,” featuring Gustav Niebuhr, the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award for Outstanding The communications industry has changed associate professor of religion and the media Magazine Photography. dramatically since the first building of the New- in the College of Arts and Sciences and the • “Freedom Sings,” a critically acclaimed house Communications Complex opened in 1964, Newhouse School; Tom Wolfe, dean of multimedia experience that tells the story of but a Newhouse education is still based on the Hendricks Chapel; and university chaplains in a almost three centuries of banned or censored fundamentals, and the First Amendment continues discussion about the First Amendment’s music in America and invites audiences to take to serve as the foundation for everything religious protections. a fresh look at the First Amendment. we do. • Banned Books Week, with Syracuse University In recognition of that, the Newhouse School Library displaying original banned books from Spring events will include “Freedom of used the dedication of Newhouse III to formally the library’s Special Collections Research Center Expression—with Fashion” on April 4 at kick off a year-long celebration of the First Amend- and others. Newhouse I. The fashion show will illustrate ment. As part of the observance, special programs • “Newspaper and Broadcast Journalism and the power of fashion to express potent political were scheduled throughout the fall and will con- Media Diversity,” featuring Paula Madison, and social messages. The show, produced by tinue into the spring. Fall programs included: executive vice president of diversity for NBC students in Newhouse’s Fashion and Beauty • Supreme Makeover: Inventing a New Model Universal. Madison was previously president Communications Milestone, will feature designs of Judicial Openness on the High Court? and general manager of KNBC, NBC’s owned created by undergraduates in the College of Visual Dahlia Lithwick, senior editor and Supreme and operated station in Los Angeles. A former and Performing Arts’ fashion design program. Court correspondent for Slate.com, was the Newhouse master’s student, she was named Other anticipated First Amendment programs this keynote speaker for this program exploring one of the 75 Most Powerful African Americans spring: the relationship among court tradition, in Corporate America by Black Enterprise • A screening of historic moments in television current news coverage, and public image magazine in 2005. that highlight the importance of the First making. Participants included Benjamin Wittes, • “Watching the World Change: From 9/11 Amendment in news and culture fellow and research director in public law with to Deep Throat,” with David Friend, director of • “The First Amendment in Cyberspace,” examin- the Brookings Institution; Tony Mauro, Supreme creative development for Vanity Fair, who in ing how the freedoms of the First Amendment Court correspondent for Legal Times, American 2005 broke the story that revealed the identity come together—and collide—online Lawyer Media and Law.com; and moderator of “Deep Throat,” Bob Woodward and Carl • “Student Protests and the Right to Peaceably Mark Obbie, director of the Carnegie Legal Bernstein’s secret Watergate source. Friend Assemble” Reporting Program at Newhouse. wrote the book Watching the World Change: • “Petition Your Government,” featuring a panel • “The Iraq War as a Breakdown of the American The Stories Behind the Images of 9/11 and of top lobbyists who will discuss the right to System,” featuring Thomas E. Ricks, military won Emmy and Peabody awards as an executive petition the government for a redress of correspondent for The Washington Post and producer of the CBS documentary 9/11. grievances best-selling author, who shared his insights • Fifth Annual Human Rights Film Festival, a from covering the Iraq war and the U.S. military. three-day film festival featuring documentaries More information on Year of the First Amendment • Bob Costas ’74, who spoke to students about on social justice issues from around the globe. events can be found online at newhouse.syr. his career in sportscasting. Costas has covered • “Screening Free Speech,” a film festival edu/nh3. sports for nearly 30 years and earned 14 Emmy focusing on First Amendment issues.6
  9. 9. Scholarship Free SpeechA First Amendment On September 19, the plays, to be renewed each our students, given that people to hold free speechScholars Program, program’s four student semester in collaboration they take three-quarters in higher regard, allowingdesigned to explore the scholars jointly unveiled with Newhouse’s Tully Cen- of their coursework there. them to see the impact itimportance and complexity a video display project, ter for Free Speech, will sup- It’s important to me and has on their everyday lives.of freedom of speech, installed on the First Amend- port our shared intention to to my successor that the “I hope this video proj-has been established ment Wall of Newhouse III, keep debate alive.” Newton relationship with the College ect helps viewers to thinkat Syracuse University that features comments on and Rubin, who have 26 of Arts and Sciences remains more broadly, passionately,through the College of free speech from a broad years of decanal leadership strong.” and personally about theArts and Sciences, the S.I. cross-section of the Syracuse between them, are stepping Described by honors rights guaranteed to them,Newhouse School of Public community. “The College down from their respective program Director Samuel and to all people of theCommunications, and the of Arts and Sciences has posts on June 30, 2008. Gorovitz as “a living exhibi- United States, through theRenée Crown University initiated this exhibition on “This project is a sign tion about a subject that First Amendment and theHonors Program. freedom of speech in honor of the deep respect and is central to our mission United States Constitution,” Funded by a gift to of Dean Rubin’s outstanding affection we have for one as a university,” the video she says.the College of Arts and leadership of the Newhouse another,” Rubin says of display is expected to stimu- Coronat Scholar Jenni-Sciences, the program also School and his steadfast Newton. “I have always late discussion about the fer Feden, of Southampton,affirms the shared values collaboration with arts and viewed Cathryn Newton as meaning of free speech. Pennsylvania, also envi-and close collaboration sciences and the honors a sympathetic, astute, and Kimberly Harris, a WellsLink sions the project addressingof the three academic program in pursuit of our cooperative partner and the and Coronat Scholar from misconceptions about theunits and pays tribute to common objectives,” says College of Arts and Sciences Aurora, Illinois, hopes the First Amendment. “The FirstNewhouse Dean David Newton. “The video dis- as a key sister school for installation will encourage continued on page 19Rubin’s strong advocacy ofliberal education, accordingto Cathryn R. Newton, First Amendment Scholars (left to right) Pearly Leung ’08, Kimberly Harris ’09, Jennifer Feden ’08, and Zac Cummings ’09.dean of arts and sciences.Under the initiative, fouror more honors programstudents dually enrolledin the College of Arts andSciences and Newhousewill be appointed FirstAmendment Scholars eachsemester. This fall’s cohortcomprises Zac Cummings’09 (magazine journalism/political science), JenniferFeden ’08 (television, radio,and film/Spanish/policystudies), Kimberly Harris ’09(magazine journalism/policystudies), and Pearly Leung’08 (television, radio, andfilm/international relations). 7
  10. 10. Newhouse in New York conversations draw communication leaders By Kathleen Haley For the past eight years, the Newhouse School has created settings in the Jon Stewart, anchor and executive producer of Comedy Central’s The Daily media capital of the world for conversations with editors, entertainers, Show with Jon Stewart; Mario Monti of the European Economic Union; commentators, and communication giants. The Newhouse in New York Richard Parsons of AOL Time Warner; Ted Turner; Judy Woodruff, anchor and breakfast series hosts well-known panelists to discuss issues affecting the senior correspondent with CNN; Disney’s Michael Eisner; Mel Karmizan, industry. Top professionals in the fields of journalism, advertising, public formerly of Viacom (currently Sirius Satellite Radio); Roger Ailes of Fox News; relations, new media, media management, law, finance, and other areas of Ana Marie Cox, founder and editor of Wonkette.com; David Chase, creator, business gain information from the speakers and share solutions to timely writer, and executive producer of HBO’s The Sopranos; Dee Dee Myers, communications issues. former White House press secretary and assistant to President Bill Clinton; Sponsored by The New Yorker and Condé Nast Communications, the Leonard Downie Jr., executive editor of The Washington Post; and Paul breakfast sessions have been held at the Condé Nast Building, W Hotel, Steiger, managing editor of The Wall Street Journal. Bryant Park Grill, and other locations. The series started in October 2000 and The series provides an outlet to showcase Newhouse and increase is moderated by Maxwell graduate Ken Auletta G’77, author and writer of The the school’s visibility. “The breakfasts have proven to be a terrific way New Yorker’s “Annals of Communications.” Participants have included David to introduce the Newhouse School to important members of the media Boies, lead counsel for the Microsoft trial; Jack Welch, former CEO of GE; community who are not Newhouse graduates,” Newhouse Dean David M. Rubin says. “They have also permitted us to expand our ‘brand’ in the media capital of the world. In the process of this brand-building, we have brought some terrific speakers into the fold and presented some very exciting programs.” Earlier this year, the series featured Leslie Moonves, president and CEO of CBS Corp.; Dean Baquet, Washington bureau chief for The New York Times and former editor at the Los Angeles Times; and Gary B. Pruitt, chairman, president, and CEO of the McClatchy Company, the third-largest newspaper company in the United States. Last year, the series brought together Marissa Mayer, director of consumer products for Google, and Nathan P. Myhrvold, founder and CEO of Intellectual Ventures, for “A Look Over the Horizon.” Another session in 2006 was titled “A Conversation with Sir Martin Sorrell.” Sorrell is the chief executive officer of WPP Group, one of the world’s largest communications services groups. Ken Auletta ’65 (right) of The New Yorker serves as moderator for a Newhouse in New York presentation featuring Yahoo CEO Terry Semel.8
  11. 11. By Carol L. Bollback to school PR professionals thrive in the classroom—and on the jobThirty years ago, the job of a public relations it on a full-time, residency basis. “I’d hear it all the students; we see their potential,” Russell says.professional focused primarily on writing news time as I traveled around, meeting with alumni,” “But this is another dimension. These people havereleases, managing media relations, and cranking Russell says. “ ‘I’m busy. I’m working. I have lots of experience, so it’s a different conversationout the company newsletter. Today, with the children. But I would love to get a master’s degree.’ you’re having. They come from all disciplines, andexplosion in technology, the emergence of the They just can’t do it in the traditional manner, the discussions are very, very lively.” With theglobal marketplace, the expectations of diverse and they get frustrated. Our goal is to give them construction of Newhouse III, the program hasconstituencies, and increasingly complex policy the high quality, rigorous education Newhouse is gained two new classrooms, each with state-issues, public relations practitioners are a critical known for, but in a flexible format.” of-the-art presentation and videoconferencingpart of strategic management. And they need to The program annually enrolls 15 to 20 stu- capabilities.bring more to the table than an ability to write dents, each of whom must have at least five—most The program has been so successful thatcompelling copy. have 10 to 20—years of professional experience. Newhouse has spun off variations to address “The field of public relations has evolved The program can be completed within two years, needs of other constituencies:significantly,” says Maria Russell, professor and but students work at their own pace. Coursework • Newhouse is collaborating with DeGrootechair of the Newhouse School’s public relations includes organizational public relations, strategic School of Business at McMaster University,department. “Public relations practitioners today management, managerial accounting and finance, Canada, in a replication of the program on thatnow have much more of a management function research, communications law, and other topics Ontario campus.than a journalism function. Today it’s more about that can be applied immediately to the workplace. • For the second year, Newhouse is conductingbeing a counselor to top management, similar Diane Thieke G’07, says she believes the a public relations certificate program forto the CFO, the lawyer, and the chief marketing program’s greatest strength is its faculty. “They’re an international association of corporateofficer. And if you don’t understand how the exceptional,” says Thieke, director of global communicators in Brazil, with Newhousebusiness works, you won’t be a valued counselor.” public relations, Enterprise Media Group, Dow faculty and alumni providing instruction on In response to those changes, the Jones. “They inform the theory with real-world five topics.Newhouse School created a master of science experience, and because of that I was able to • Newhouse also has been asked to help trainin communications management specifically for apply what I learned in residency as soon as I got 150 new public relations employees for a majorindustry professionals interested in expanding back into the office. I’m still in awe of the people Brazilian corporation.or updating their skills. Now in its 13th year, the who guided me in the classroom.” Russell attributes much of the program’sprogram is designed as a two-year independent Syracuse has been a pioneer in independent success to the wealth of experience the studentsstudy program, with three one-week residencies study—or executive education—degree programs, bring into the classroom. “This is an incrediblyeach year—two at SU and one at the University’s Russell says, and today’s technologies further talented group of people,” she says. “They’reLubin House in New York City. enhance such opportunities. Communications very successful, and they’re committed to lifelong Russell, who initiated the idea 15 years ago, management students come from all over the learning. They’re also great role models for oursays the program meets the needs of professionals world and bring their own unique perspectives undergraduates. They know that to stay on top,who want to pursue a master’s degree but can’t do into the classroom. “We love our undergraduate you have to continue your education all the time.” 9
  12. 12. Glenn Rigberg, manager of Rigberg Entertainment, speaks to a group of SU undergraduates participating in a weeklong seminar in Los Angeles. By George Thomas Newhouse students to learn from top industry professionals Imagine having the opportunity as a student a semester studying with industry professionals Once the curriculum is developed, students to study under the supervision of an award- in New York City. The program, Schoonmaker will choose what particular area of the TRF winning screenwriter or at a production company says, gave students a great opportunity to apply industry they would like to study. Part internship, that boasts a laundry list of successful films. the knowledge they learned in the classroom to part critical-thinking exercise, the program will Newhouse students may soon be doing just that. real-world situations. It eventually evolved into a include some required courses but will leave The Newhouse School’s television-radio-film weeklong, mid-semester seminar in Los Angeles. room for students to choose their own area of department (TRF) plans to install “campuses” The idea for reviving a semester-long focus. It also will include tutorials in film and in Los Angeles and New York City, where program grew out of the popularity of those television production as well as sound production, undergraduate TRF students can go for semester- seminars, according to Schoonmaker. He adds management, radio, and screenwriting. The long programs that teach them the ins and outs that the new program, which he hopes to launch tutorials will immerse students in a working of the field. Think of it as a study abroad program, in the fall of 2008, is likely to be even stronger studio environment. The semester will count for says Michael Schoonmaker, professor and chair than the original since Newhouse today has 12 credits, so students can take part in the of the TRF department, who is spearheading the close contacts in both cities who are willing to program without falling behind in their regular effort. Each city’s program will have its own feel participate in such a venture. program of study. and focus. The Los Angeles campus may be a Schoonmaker says the experience will be For more information about the proposed studio lot where a film is in production, while the invaluable for students since much of what they TRF programs in New York and Los Angeles, New York campus might be an office where editing need to know can best be learned on site. “You contact Schoonmaker at 315-443-9240 or takes place. cannot re-create these industry settings,” he says. msschoon@syr.edu. The idea has its roots in a program Newhouse “It’s important to drop students in the middle of operated in the 1980s, in which students spent these locations and show how vast they are.”10
  13. 13. Nhouse Productions allows students to show off their skills Think of it as Newhouse’s answer to YouTube. Nhouse Productions, an online film archive created in 2005 at the school, showcases Newhouse student work, allowing undergraduate and graduate students in the television-radio-film (TRF) department to show off their filmmaking skills for the s ma world to see. “People just might see the outside of the Newhouse building but not really know what ho goes on inside or what the students actually do,” says Michael Schoonmaker, professor eT and chair of the TRF department. “The point of Nhouse is to show the students’ work rg and also to engage commentary and discussion from viewers.” Schoonmaker says it’s eo important to highlight the quality work created by TRF students, whom he calls “the G next generation of storytellers.”By Students with Nhouse collected and catalogued several films created by TRF students and placed them on the Nhouse web site at nhouse.syr.edu. Working with Orange Television Network, the on-campus cable television network, students also arranged for the films to be broadcast on campus television. The genre of choice so far on Nhouse appears to be comedy, with eight films archived in that category. For example, the darkly comic Le Womanequinn, directed by Jacob Perlin and Ian Wishingrad, both senior TRF majors, explores the consequences that befall a group of students who force one of their roommates to get rid of his prized possession—a mannequin he calls Marilyn. In addition to comedic works, the site features documentaries and dramatic videos. Also planned are animation, commercials, magazines, music videos, and movie trailers. To assist in maintaining the Nhouse web site, Nhouse students collaborate with students in the new media master’s program. “We were originally going to keep the management of the site as a class function, but it’s a 24/7 kind of operation,” Schoonmaker says. “We could not have done it without the help of the new media students.” Nhouse producers last year included project manager Dan Herrick ’07, a TRF major; manager of production operations Todd Sodano, an adjunct professor in the TRF department; post-production coordinator Samantha Grogin ’07, a TRF major; and content editor Josh Cregg ’08, a TRF major. One hurdle Nhouse Productions must deal with is the constant turnover of students. But with fresh content available every new semester, Schoonmaker says, he is confident it will continue to grow with each talented class. For now, he’s taking it slow. “It’s the kind of thing you build in pieces,” he says. “We needed equipment, content, a server. It just takes time.” For more information on Nhouse Productions, contact Schoonmaker at 315-443-9240 or msschoon@syr.edu. 11
  14. 14. 12
  15. 15. Military Photojournalists Reveal the of Syracuse’s South side by Christy Perry In a semester-long project, The site describes the South Newhouse Military Photojournalism Side photos as “…a microscopic (MPJ) students used their cameras peek into an urban society: a society to tell the stories of the people and that both enforced and dispelled businesses of Syracuse’s South the preconceived notions of the Side. The results of their work are participating photojournalists. … posted online at www.mpj2007.com. Through the lenses of our Nikons Greg Hedges, a visual and we journeyed with three homeless interactive communications men as they failed in their attempt professor who helped the students to stay clean; sat in the chair of develop the web site, says the the local barbershop and gossip site works in conjunction with chamber; and learned the joy a magazine the MPJ students of literacy from an 81-year-old produced under the guidance of bookworm.” professors Sherri Taylor and David More information on the Sutherland. The web site expands military visual journalism on the publication by including extra programs is available online at photos and companion multimedia newhousemilitary.syr.edu. packages of the stories. It also features biographies and multiple galleries showcasing the MPJ students’ other Newhouse projects. Photos by (opposite page) R. Jason Brunson and Matthew Bash; (this page, top to bottom) Laura A. Moore; Bennie J. Davis III; Bradley Church 13
  16. 16. mock crisis offers real-world training By Kevin Morrow quarrel, the suspect panics, firing on the officers and barricading himself and the young woman in Newhouse School faculty and Syracuse her room. University’s Department of Public Safety staged a mock emergency in August to provide Dozens of SU students and staff participated Enrollment Hits New High as actors. The journalists-in-training faced A record number of master’s degree “breaking news” training for 93 master’s degree several challenges trying to follow and process students—238 to be exact—began their students. The students are enrolled in the all that was occurring on the scene. Among studies in the Newhouse School this magazine-newspaper-online, arts journalism, the difficulties was the fact that what likely summer. That’s about 6 percent more than public relations and public diplomacy programs would have transpired over many hours was last year. In addition, Newhouse added at Newhouse. compressed to fewer than two hours to enable two professional degree programs in 2007. This was the ninth year of the annual the students to complete their assignment within Welcoming their first students in July summertime collaboration. The scenario this the course’s allotted time frame. were documentary film and history, with time involved a gunman and a hostage situation In addition to providing the Newhouse 5 enrolled, and public diplomacy, with in Lawrinson Hall, a high-rise residence hall on students with subject matter for deadline 13 enrolled. the SU campus. The back story: The gunman reporting, the situation doubled as a training The television-radio-film program took is the ex-boyfriend of an SU student living in exercise for the participating agencies, including in the most students—a record-breaking Lawrinson Hall. He and another man, a hardened the Syracuse Police Department, FBI, SUNY 45. The graduate program in magazine- criminal and arms dealer, are on their way to College of Environmental Science and Forestry newspaper-online journalism was second, Canada to pursue a get-rich scheme. They stop in University Police, SU Ambulance, SU’s Office of with 40 students. The broadcast journalism Syracuse so the first suspect can try to persuade Residence Life and Division of Public Affairs, and program has 37 students enrolled. his former girlfriend, a current SU student, to join Rural/Metro Medical Services. them. When the suspect arrives at her residence While somewhat reminiscent of events at hall and she continues to rebuff him, Virginia Tech last April, the mock emergency was Disney Daytime Chief the suspect becomes actually conceptualized in February by SU Public Shares Insights agitated and loud. Brian Frons G’78, president of Daytime, Safety Deputy Chief Drew Buske and Newhouse When SU public Disney-ABC Television Group, came to instructor Emilie Davis. Following the Virginia safety officers campus in October to meet with students Tech shootings, organizers decided to proceed arrive following in the Newhouse with the scenario, as that tragedy reinforced an a report School and imperative among university responders and of a SU’s Martin J. law enforcement agencies across the country to be vigilant and prepared for a potentially Whitman School violent situation on campus. of Management. Frons visited two classes—Principles and Practices: Television, Radio, Film Industries, taught by Newhouse associate professor Larry Elin, and Marketing Communications, taught by Whitman Distinguished Professor Sevilimedu Raj. Frons also gave a talk titled “The Keys to L.A.–Adjusting, Surviving, and Making It in the City of Angels,” which covered, among other things, current and future trends in television and his thoughts on marketable skills for career development.14
  17. 17. “War Surrounds Us” Wins Accolades encouraging the free practice of journalism, stimulating high standards of ethical behavior, and inspiring andNewhouse print journalism students took top honors in educating the next generation of journalists. The SPJrecent months in competitions sponsored by the Association received more than 3,300 entries in 39 categories acrossfor Education in Journalism and Mass Communication 12 regions for the 2007 awards.(AEJMC) and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ). – George Thomas “War Surrounds Us,” a special 2006 edition of the SUstudent newspaper The Student Voice, won first place in the Ad Students Take 4th in NationalsAEJMC’s 2007 Newspaper Division Newspaper Competitionand a first place from the SPJ for in-depth reporting. Advertising students in the Newhouse School took fourth- “War Surrounds Us” focuses on the war on terror. place honors at this year’s National Student AdvertisingUndergraduate and graduate print journalism students Competition (NSAC) in Louisville, Kentucky.wrote the stories, working under the direction of Steve Although Syracuse had won at the district level severalDavis, professor and chair of the newspaper department, times, this was the first time in 30 years it had competedand John Hatcher, now an assistant professor of journalism at nationals. “Four years ago the team came in 13th atat the University of Minnesota Duluth. regionals,” says Ed Russell, professor of advertising at “The judges were impressed with the quality Newhouse. “Three years ago they were third, then second,of reporting, writing, editing, photos, and design, as then first. …I still believe this is the best communicationswell as the wonderful learning experience this was for school in the country, with the best students. We just needyour students,” wrote Ann Auman, co-chair of AEJMC’s to prove it.”Newspaper Division Teaching Standards. Awards were The student competitors, all advertising majors fromhanded out in August at the annual AEJMC convention in the Class of 2007, were Brian Stout, Laura Lefkowitz, RyanWashington, D.C. Parkhurst, Janet Levine, Jenn Spaeth, and Julia Amirzadov. The SPJ award for in-depth reporting was presented Sponsored by the American Advertising Federation,during the organization’s spring conference at Hofstra the NSAC is considered the premier student advertisingUniversity in Hempstead, New York. “It is incredible to see competition in the country. More than 80,000 studentsall of the hard work that (Davis) devotes to working with have participated in the contest, which has become anstudents pay off in such a prestigious way,” says Carla attraction for ad industry recruiters seeking new talent.Lloyd, associate dean of scholarly and creative activity at – George ThomasNewhouse, of the SPJ award. This is just the latest round of accolades for “War Networking Group NamedSurrounds Us.” The article “Young Soldier Puts Life Back Chapter of the YearTogether,” written by Julianne Pepitone ’08 and Allison The Syracuse University chapter of Ed2010, a nationalBaker ’08 and featured in the special issue, previously magazine networking group, recently won thatwon first prize for feature writing in the 2006 Rolling Stone organization’s inaugural Best Established Chapter of themagazine College Journalism Competition. Year award. Ed2010 brings together aspiring magazine Excerpts from “War Surrounds Us” can be viewed editors who share the goal of working in magazines and/oronline at newhouse.syr.edu/images/studentVoiceMNO.pdf. publishing. – Christy Perry and George Thomas SU’s chapter of Ed2010 offers its members networking events, resume and writing workshops, and magazine chatstudents honored by spj events throughout the academic year. The chapter staysTwo Newhouse print journalism students won awards connected to internship opportunities, past internshipfrom the Society of Professional Journalists during the experiences, possible job openings, and industry-relatedorganization’s spring conference at Hofstra University in news through a biweekly chapter newsletter. It also hasHempstead, New York. brought notable speakers to campus, including Print Ethan Ramsey ’08 won first-place honors in the sports magazine’s Joyce Rutter-Kaye, Esquire.com’s Eric Gillin,writing category for his article titled “State of the Athletic author Lindsey Pollak, and feminist journalist GloriaDepartment.” Melanie Hicken ’09 received third place in Steinem.the breaking news category for her article “Governor Cuts SU’s Ed2010 chapter advisors are professors MelissaHigher Education Tuition Assistance.” Chessher and Bill Glavin. More information about the The Society of Professional Journalists is the country’s chapter is available at www.syracuseed2010.com.most broad-based journalism organization, dedicated to – Christy Perry 15
  18. 18. Mirror Awards Competition a success by Wendy S. Loughlin Peter Bart, editor in chief of Variety, received the inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award at the ceremony. He was introduced by columnist and author Liz Smith. Meredith Vieira, co-anchor of the NBC morning news program Today, hosted the event. Luncheon committee co-chairs for the event included Rob Light, partner, Creative Artists; Judy McGrath, chairman and CEO, MTV The media’s top writers, readers, and leaders Networks; Ron Meyer, president and gathered in New York City in June to honor COO, Universal Studios; Aaron Sorkin, seven winners in the first annual Mirror Awards writer; and Jeff Zucker, president and Competition. Established by the Newhouse CEO, NBC Universal. School to recognize excellence in media industry Several corporations in the media reporting, the competition drew 140 entries. industry underwrote the event, including Winners were: members of the Mirror Premier Circle: Advance Publications Inc.; Condé Nast Individual Awards Publications; Discovery Communications • Best Single Article: “Blogs to Riches,” Inc.; NBC Universal; Reed Business Clive Thompson, New York Magazine Information; Time Warner Cable; and Variety. • Best Profile: “A Guy Named Craig,” More information about the Philip Weiss, New York Magazine Mirror Awards is available online at • Best Commentary: “The Media Equation,” mirrorawards.syr.edu. For information David Carr, The New York Times about entering this year’s competition, contact Jean Brooks at 315-443-5711 • Best Coverage of Breaking Industry News: or jabroo01@syr.edu. The next Mirror “A Local Newspaper Endures a Stormy Awards ceremony will be in June 2008. Backlash,” Dean Miller, Nieman Reports • Best Subject-Related Series: “Among the Audience: A Survey of New Media,” Andreas Kluth, The Economist Editors or Teams of Writers • Excellence in Media Information Services: HealthNewsReview.org, University of Minnesota School of Journalism and Mass Communication • Overall Excellence: American Journalism Review Andreas Kluth Gary Schwitzer The Economist University of Minnesota School of Journalism and Mass Communication16
  19. 19. Ivory Tower Half Hour goes statewide by George ThomasThe Ivory Tower Half Hour, a weekly public affairs “We think this show is valuable to viewers Still, he believes the topics and discussions onprogram produced and broadcast on Syracuse because it is different from the other television the program are relevant and valuable to viewerspublic television station WCNY-TV, began airing talk shows,” says Rubin. “We don’t shout and everywhere.statewide this fall. The show, now in its fifth year, is hector and talk over each other. In short, we Other regular panelists on the programthe most popular local program aired by WCNY-TV. have a civilized, if spirited, conversation. And include Kristi Andersen, professor of political Hosted by Newhouse Dean David Rubin, we provide it from the perspective of Central science at SU’s Maxwell School of CitizenshipThe Ivory Tower Half Hour New York and not and Public Affairs; Tim Byrnes, professor offeatures faculty from Washington—that is political science at Colgate University; LisaNewhouse as well as other crucial.” Dolak, associate dean at SU’s College of Law;Central New York colleges Although the Bob Greene, Paul J. Schupt Professor of Historyand universities in discus- program’s viewing area and Humanities at Cazenovia College; Tara Ross,sions on local and global is expanding statewide, professor of history at Onondaga Communityissues. Topics have included the show will stick with College; and Bob Spitzer, Distinguished Servicethe war in Iraq, the Virginia its Central New York Professor of political science at SUNY Cortland.Tech shootings, and the panelists in order to Newhouse professor Barbara Fought serves2008 presidential election. preserve the chemistry occasionally as guest host. among the participants, according to Rubin. CNY’s First Environmental Magazine is MNO Student’s Brainchild by Jason LevyAs a child, Khristopher capstone project. In six short artist who created a sprawl- issue prototype to pitch the the magazine and itsDodson received a book—50 weeks they created Envi, a ing temple of trash next to a idea to a growing list of inter- web site, visit www.enviWays to Save the Planet— magazine that, according busy highway. ested investors. To check out magazineonline.com.that changed his worldview to its web site, is dedicated But Envi is more than aand hinted at his future. to “exploring our region’s magazine, and the cap- Thanks to his cap- people, places, wildlife, and stone is notable for another Khristopher Dodson, editorstone experience, Dodson history.” reason. For the first time in in chief, discusses magazinenow knows 51 ways. The The launch issue the department’s history, layout with Wanda Lau,Newhouse and SUNY College features a wide variety of Envi creative director, in the the course also included an Newhouse computer labs.of Environmental Science stories, including an inves- online version of the publica-and Forestry graduate tigative piece on well water tion, including 18 originalstudent wants to start an in the region, a profile of stories, four sound slidesenvironmental magazine the most eco-friendly house (slideshows with narration),for Central New York. Lucky in New York, a roundup of photo galleries, and a read-for Dodson, 27 of his fellow green transportation, a travel ers’ blog. Dodson says hemagazine, newspaper, and narrative based on a trip to plans to bring the magazineonline journalism graduate Ithaca’s eco-village, a service to newsstands and housesstudents decided to help by story on eat-local options, across Central New York andchoosing his idea as their and a photo essay on a folk use the 100-page, premiere- 17
  20. 20. By Christy Perry Flocke Wins Shoemaker Named Keller Matlock Inducted SU London Distinguished Educator Cited for into Hall of Fame Award Pamela J. Shoemaker, John Ben Excellence Marshall Matlock may be best Professor Lynne Snow Professor in the Newhouse Professor Johanna known at Newhouse for organizing Flocke last spring School, received the Distinguished Keller, director the Society for News Design’s annual was awarded the Educator Award for excellence in of the Goldring creative competition. The largest Michael O’Leary teaching from the Association for Arts Journalism newspaper design competition prize for excellence Education in Journalism and Mass Program, recently in the world handed Matlock its in teaching. The student-nominated Communication (AEJMC) during received a faculty excellence award Lifetime Achievement Award this award, presented each semester its national conference in August from Syracuse University’s Graduate past year, honoring him for his work by SU London, recognizes those in Washington, D.C. The award is School. in news design. professors who truly make the study presented annually to an individual Keller was selected along Now Matlock has been inducted abroad experience as valuable and who demonstrates excellence in with six faculty members from into Central Michigan University’s rewarding as possible. teaching and a profound influence across campus to receive the 2007 (CMU) Journalism Hall of Fame. A Flocke, who teaches Com- on pedagogy in the field of Excellence in Graduate Education 1967 graduate munications Law for Journalists, is communications. Faculty Recognition Award. The of CMU, he was the first visiting American faculty In addition, Shoemaker won award honors faculty members recognized for member to win the prize. The prize two research awards at the AEJMC whose dedication to graduate his work as a is named after Michael O’Leary, who conference: top faculty paper in the students and commitment to “trailblazer” in the taught public affairs in London for Mass Communication and Society excellence in graduate mentoring field of scholastic a number of years before his death. Division and the Ecquid Novi Award have made a significant contribution journalism. SU London encourages its faculty for international research. to graduate education at Syracuse Matlock is a to go beyond a strictly classroom- Shoemaker, an internationally University. former Michigan Interscholastic based instruction and use all of the known scholar, co-authored with In addition to her teaching Press Association Outstanding resources at their disposal in Great Stephen D. Reese the books and Goldring duties, Keller was the Teacher of the Year and has received Britain and Europe. Among the Gatekeeping and Mediating the first nonfiction editor of the SU arts state and national honors in the field. students’ comments in nominating Message: Theories of Influences journal Stone Canoe: A Journal of Matlock began teaching at Flocke: on Mass Media Content. An Arts and Ideas From Upstate New Newhouse in 1973. He has taught • “She has taken what could be internationally known scholar, she is York. The publication won a bronze mass communications, news a very boring, tedious class and a past president medal from the 2007 Independent writing, advanced reporting, editing, turned it into an interesting and (1995-1996) Publisher Book Awards. The first graphics, and news design. He also engaging course. …She is very of AEJMC and issue of Stone Canoe features work has served as director of student passionate about her subject, and has served on from 71 artists and writers, ranging affairs and as executive assistant to we all respect that.” the editorial from Pulitzer Prize-winners to those three deans. • “Lynne Flocke is absolutely the boards of many being published for the first time. best teacher I’ve had at SU major journals The publication’s mission is to London, and probably one of the in the mass augment the University’s ongoing best in my entire academic career. communications efforts to build creative partnerships She really wants her students to field. She earned bachelor’s within the larger community and to learn and enjoys watching them and master’s degrees from Ohio showcase the impressive range of do so.” University and a Ph.D. degree artistic activity that characterizes life from the University of Wisconsin- in upstate New York. Madison.18
  21. 21. Scholarship... continued from page 7 Amendment only prevents the government from limiting free speech.New Faculty This does not mean that limits to free speech do not exist in our soci- ety,” she says, citing actor Isaiah Washington’s recent firing from Grey’sJames C. Tsao comes to Newhouse from the University of Wisconsin- Anatomy over a highly publicized anti-gay slur. “People are free toOshkosh, where he has served on the faculty since 1992. His positions speak their minds, even when doing so might emotionally harm others,there have included, most recently, chair of the Department of but they are not free to do so in a way that directly endangers others.Journalism; chair of the humanities division, College of Letters and For example, the government could stop a rally that is going to leadSciences; and professor in the Department of Journalism. Prior to his directly to an attack on a given group of people.” Adds Zac Cummings,position at University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Tsao was an assistant of Atkinson, New Hampshire, and a member of the Orange Seeds leader- professor in the Department of English and Journalism ship program, “The biggest misconception is that the First Amendment at Western Illinois University. Outside of academia, he protects people in the private arena. In reality, it only protects our rights co-founded Multimedia Market Research Associates, from the government, not from the workplace or other private institu- providing consulting services for the Wisconsin free tions.” community papers industry; and he has held a variety “Most people don’t bother to think about our constitutional of other positions in the fields of market research, rights and what they allow us to do,” says Pearly Leung, a Fuji Junior communications, and media. He was a freelance Filmmaker of the Year from West Windsor, N.J. “Maybe this video can be reporter for China Times and managing editor of a small reminder of that.”Washington News, two publications based in Washington, D.C.; and Rubin says the First Amendment video project had been percolatingan executive producer of China Television Network, in Taiwan. for a while before a dual major from the Class of ’53 helped make it a Tsao earned an undergraduate degree in broadcasting from reality by supporting the project. Of the College of Arts and SciencesWestern Kentucky University; a master’s degree in communications from contribution, Rubin says, “It’s unusual that one school would supportWestern Illinois University; and a doctorate in mass communications another school specifically to establish something within a new building.from Temple University. It’s not that schools don’t contribute in various ways to other schools; He was named a United Daily News Forum Scholar, Department of they just don’t usually do it in such an elegant and impressive way.”Advertising, at National Chengchi University. Gorovitz says he is delighted that the project encourages students to engage with the city. “Our scholars have already gone to manyBruce Strong has worked on assignment as a staff or freelance locations—such as the state fair, the regional market, the airport—tophotographer in nearly 60 countries. His work has been published in collect hours of interviews,” he says. “We will then work with BarbaraTime, Newsweek, U.S. News World Report, National Geographic, Fought, director of the Tully Center, to produce the finished product,and various international magazines. He also worked at The Orange which will air in the Newhouse III atrium along with other video projects,County Register for more than a decade. Before coming to Newhouse, sustaining a climate of discussion and debate.”he served as the visiting professional at Ohio University School of VisualCommunication, where he previously was awarded theKnight Fellowship in newsroom graphics managementand publication design. Strong also served as theKellogg Public Policy Fellow at the University ofMichigan Journalism Fellowships Program. Strong, who obtained a bachelor’s degree inphoto illustration/photojournalism from Rochester ParentInstitute of Technology, has received recognition E-newsletterfor his photography from the National Press Keep up-to-date with the NewhousePhotographers Association, the Society of Newspaper Designers, School by signing up for our specialthe Associated Press News Executives Council, and Women in biannual parents e-newsletter. You canCommunications. In 1993 the California Press Photographers subscribe by sending an e-mail to listserv@Association named him California Photographer of the Year. Strong and listserv.syr.edu with the message “subhis wife, Claudia, co-wrote the book Armenia: The Story of a Place in newhseparentnews” and your name.Essays Images. 19
  22. 22. Lauren Pomerantz ’03 revealing the Power of the Lens By Agatha Lutoborski During her undergraduate studies at Syracuse A photography major now studying medicine Action, where she put together human-interest University, Lauren Pomerantz ’03 spent a semester at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Pomerantz stories about stigmatized social groups that the documenting the life of discovered a post-graduation niche in international organization helps, such as “untouchables” and a 15-year-old Latina girl, philanthropy, using her camera to focus attention commercial sex workers. “I was in a park with a Taina, and her family as part on those living in hardship in other parts of the group of sex workers, and I asked them whether of a final assignment for a world. She says those experiences contributed or not they had boyfriends,” she says. “They all photography class. It was to her decision to study medicine. “With photo- started giggling, and it was the exact same reac- Pomerantz’s first glimpse graphy, it’s all about people,” she says. “And that’s tion that I would have with my friends. Moments of life outside middle-class my main interest.” like that really hit home, and you realize everyone America, and, she says, it was Pomerantz began her career working as a is the same and wants the same things.” an eye-opening experience. newspaper photographer in Newburgh, New What she saw in India strengthened It also has led Pomerantz in unexpected directions York. After six months, she Pomerantz’s desire to attend medical school. since graduating from Newhouse four felt drawn elsewhere and, After completing a postbaccalaureate premedical years ago. on a whim, decided to fly to program at New York University, she went to India. She took a job with the Guatemala as part of a University of Southern Deccan Herald, a large daily California program, Somos Hermanos, which newspaper in Bangalore, teaches Spanish to students going into health- but she found the work related careers in that country. She then put her confining. “I was only camera to use in Guatemala for a nonprofit that exposed to one side of builds schools in rural villages. “It’s hard when the society,” she says. you just photograph someone who’s poor; you “I wanted to see more.” feel like you’re taking and not giving,” she says. She did just that “I don’t know if that person will benefit from what while working for the I did.” not-for-profit organiza- But Pomerantz did find a way to give tion New Entity for Social back: When she returned from Guatemala, she20
  23. 23. Images of Guatemala and India by Lauren Pomerantzshowed her photographs to members of hertemple. Inspired by her work, they conducted aclothing drive for the Guatemalan villages shehad photographed. More than a ton of clothingand school supplies was donated, and a Latinoshipping company provided free shipping.Pomerantz continues to sell her photographs fromGuatemala and India through her web site, web.mac.com/lalapantz/iWeb/Site/WELCOME.html,with proceeds going toward a school constructionproject in Guatemala. “I found it amazing that my photos wereable to draw support from people with no priorconnection to the Latino/Guatemalan community,”Pomerantz says of her efforts. “The skills I gotfrom Newhouse allowed me to do that.” She also believes the interviewing andinterpersonal skills she developed at Newhouseand as a photographer will serve her well as adoctor. “I’m less afraid to approach people I don’tknow,” she says. “I’m good at talking with peopleand getting them to open up. And I think that willhelp me empathize with patients.” 21

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