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One Click Curve to Rule them all

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One Click Curve to Rule them all

  1. 1. One Click Curve to Rule them all September 2014 | Gary Moyle, Head of SEO UK
  2. 2. @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  3. 3. The story so far… @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  4. 4. The story so far… @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  5. 5. The story so far… @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  6. 6. Why should you care about this study? This study features the largest GWT dataset to date… 1.2M KEYWORDS 65M CLICKS 54 BRANDS 311M IMPRESSIONS @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  7. 7. That’s a LOT of data! @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  8. 8. A Daunting Challenge Certainty of death. Small chance of success. What are we waiting for? @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  9. 9. Our Methodology Acquisition  GWT  Custom Scripts  Filtering Processing  Omniscope  Data Cleaning  Filtering  Aggregation @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  10. 10. How has search evolved since 2011? Average Position NetBooster (2014) Catalyst (2013) Slingshot (2011) Smoother transition into the lower positions (Normalised Data) @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  11. 11. A New Click Curve To Rule Them All We need to start thinking beyond the top 10! Average Position @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  12. 12. A New Click Curve To Rule Them All 1-10 Average Position @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  13. 13. A New Click Curve To Rule Them All 11-20 Average Position @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  14. 14. A New Click Curve To Rule Them All 21-30 Average Position @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  15. 15. How does brand influence the curve? Average Position Large Brand Medium Brand Small Brand Know where and when to fight your battles @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  16. 16. Impact of Query Length on CTR 1 word query 2 word query 3 word query 4 word query authority plays a big role for 1 word queries Average Position Brand @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  17. 17. How can you optimise your CTR? Publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising CTR  Page titles @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  18. 18. How can you optimise your CTR? Publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising CTR  Meta Descriptions @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  19. 19. How can you optimise your CTR? Publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising CTR  URL @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  20. 20. How can you optimise your CTR? Publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising CTR  Rich Snippets @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  21. 21. How can you use this data? Accurate CTR can offer practical business uses Benchmarking Forecasting Opportunities CTR @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  22. 22. Benchmarking Your Performance Is your CTR underperforming? To contextualise your own website, extract one month of data, calculate the total number of impressions from your branded queries and see where you fit within the following bands: Small = < 28.5k 28.5 – 285k 285k + Large Medium Small @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  23. 23. This is only the first step in a long journey…  Segmenting search queries by intent  Understanding CTR by industry or niche  Monitoring the effect of new knowledge graph formats  Organic Participation  Evolving search behaviour @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  24. 24. A final note Search behaviour is evolving @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  25. 25. A final note We need to think beyond the top 10! @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  26. 26. A final note We need to maximise the traffic created from existing rankings and not just think about position @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  27. 27. A final note Understanding how we all interact with new forms of search results will be a crucial part of measuring and creating success! @NetBoosterUK @GaryMoyle NB
  28. 28. Thanks for your attention www.netbooster.com

Editor's Notes

  • How does our study compare against others?

    Lets start by looking at the top 10 results

    In this graph we see normalised the results in order to compare our curve like-for-like with previous studies.

    Straight away we can see that there is higher participation beyond the top 4 positions when compared to other studies

    We can also see much higher CTR for positions lower on the pages which indicates that searchers are more comfortable scrolling below the fold.
  • When we look at the entire top 30 we can also see a decent amount of clicks on pages 2 & 3

    This means we need to start thinking beyond the top 10!

    This curve will also give us a better understanding of the potential uplift in visits when improving rankings from positions 11-30

    But it’s also important we don’t just rely on one single click curve
  • Top 10 Results
  • Results 11-20
  • Results 21-30
  • Brand influence is also something that we need to consider.

    In particular, How does the size of the brand influence the curve?

    We banded our each of these domains into small, medium and large categories based on the sum of brand query impressions for each individual site across the entire duration of the study.

    We can see that better known brands get a sizeable increase in CTR

    Small to medium sized brands are in fact losing out to results from well established brands.

    Keyphrase selection will be important for smaller brand. Know where and when to fight your battles
  • We also looked at long tail search queries to understand whether query refinement had an impact

    1 word searches are likely dominated by larger more well known brands in higher positions so it’s no surprise we can see a high CTR for those types of queries

    However we can see the highest CTR as primarily for queries with 4 or more words which indicates higher satisfaction as users refine their searches
  • Fortunately publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising the CTR of their content.
    Page Titles
    Page titles add meaning and relevance for both human searchers and search engines. Using relevant  keywords in page titles are heavily weighted by search engines
    Page titles should be descriptive and relevant to page content
    Keep titles under 70 characters (512 pixels) in length, including spaces
    Include keywords at beginning of title
    Each page should have a unique title
    Meta Descriptions
    Although meta descriptions are not directly used by search engine algorithms they are an important way to influence CTR. It’s therefore vital you write compelling ad copy.
    Keep under 160 characters in length (including Spaces)
    Add as many unique selling points as possible
    Include a clear call to action
    Add a unique and relevant description for each page
    Rich Snippets (Schema)
    A regular snippet displays the sites meta description or automatically generated description of the page content. A rich snippet however, gives more information about a search result such as review information, product name or price. Aggregate star rating for example can really make sure content stand out and influence both CTR and conversion in a positive way.
    The page content must contain the correct mark-up for search engines to understand the content and display the rich snippet
    Microdata outlined on Schema.org is the preferred form of mark-up.
    Google currently supports rich snippets for people, events, reviews, products, recipes, and breadcrumb navigation

    URL Optimisation
    Although your URL makes up a relatively small part of the search snippet, it can still be a valuable way to make the snippet stand out to users.
  • Fortunately publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising the CTR of their content.
    Page Titles
    Page titles add meaning and relevance for both human searchers and search engines. Using relevant  keywords in page titles are heavily weighted by search engines
    Page titles should be descriptive and relevant to page content
    Keep titles under 70 characters (512 pixels) in length, including spaces
    Include keywords at beginning of title
    Each page should have a unique title
    Meta Descriptions
    Although meta descriptions are not directly used by search engine algorithms they are an important way to influence CTR. It’s therefore vital you write compelling ad copy.
    Keep under 160 characters in length (including Spaces)
    Add as many unique selling points as possible
    Include a clear call to action
    Add a unique and relevant description for each page
    Rich Snippets (Schema)
    A regular snippet displays the sites meta description or automatically generated description of the page content. A rich snippet however, gives more information about a search result such as review information, product name or price. Aggregate star rating for example can really make sure content stand out and influence both CTR and conversion in a positive way.
    The page content must contain the correct mark-up for search engines to understand the content and display the rich snippet
    Microdata outlined on Schema.org is the preferred form of mark-up.
    Google currently supports rich snippets for people, events, reviews, products, recipes, and breadcrumb navigation

    URL Optimisation
    Although your URL makes up a relatively small part of the search snippet, it can still be a valuable way to make the snippet stand out to users.
  • Fortunately publishers have a number of options when it comes to optimising the CTR of their content.
    Page Titles
    Page titles add meaning and relevance for both human searchers and search engines. Using relevant  keywords in page titles are heavily weighted by search engines
    Page titles should be descriptive and relevant to page content
    Keep titles under 70 characters (512 pixels) in length, including spaces
    Include keywords at beginning of title
    Each page should have a unique title
    Meta Descriptions
    Although meta descriptions are not directly used by search engine algorithms they are an important way to influence CTR. It’s therefore vital you write compelling ad copy.
    Keep under 160 characters in length (including Spaces)
    Add as many unique selling points as possible
    Include a clear call to action
    Add a unique and relevant description for each page
    Rich Snippets (Schema)
    A regular snippet displays the sites meta description or automatically generated description of the page content. A rich snippet however, gives more information about a search result such as review information, product name or price. Aggregate star rating for example can really make sure content stand out and influence both CTR and conversion in a positive way.
    The page content must contain the correct mark-up for search engines to understand the content and display the rich snippet
    Microdata outlined on Schema.org is the preferred form of mark-up.
    Google currently supports rich snippets for people, events, reviews, products, recipes, and breadcrumb navigation

    URL Optimisation
    Although your URL makes up a relatively small part of the search snippet, it can still be a valuable way to make the snippet stand out to users.

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