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"Good Job": A story of motivation, encouragement, and dramatic failures

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As we strive to become better testers, both as individuals and within our organisation, we frequently encounter challenges around self-improvement and motivation. How do we balance one of our most precious commodities - time - with our desire to succeed in both our work and personal lives?

It's often even harder when we're trying to help enact change in those around us. What's the best way to offer mentoring and encouragement to your colleagues, without seeming preachy or overbearing? Do we sometimes have to accept that some people can't (or won't) improve?

In this talk, Neil will share his vision on how we can encourage the next generation of testers to join our community, and how we can be welcoming whilst also striving for excellence. We'll see some of Neil's own journey of personal discovery, some difficult experiences that he's faced, and dabble a little bit in Hollywood cinema along the way!

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"Good Job": A story of motivation, encouragement, and dramatic failures

  1. 1. A story of motivation, encouragement, and dramatic failures @neilstudd
  2. 2. Blurring of boundaries Changing role Technical skills ++
  3. 3. Structure (To-do lists, targets, personal Kanban) Motivation (of self, of colleagues) Encouragement (but beware: expectations -> pressure) Environment (conditions for learning, pace) Mentor/Manager
  4. 4. Structure (To-do lists, targets, personal Kanban) Motivation (of self, of colleagues) Encouragement (but beware: expectations -> pressure) Environment (conditions for learning, pace)
  5. 5. There’s zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas. Introverts… may have strong social skills and enjoy parties and business meetings, but after a while wish they were home in their pajamas. They prefer to devote their social energies to close friends, colleagues, and family. They listen more than they talk, think before they speak, and often feel as if they express themselves better in writing than in conversation. They tend to dislike conflict. Many have a horror of small talk, but enjoy deep discussions.
  6. 6. Drink!
  7. 7. Push people beyond what’s expected of them With one goal in mind: Never to be laughed at again I will never apologise for how I tried There are no two words more harmful than ‘good job’
  8. 8. Until…
  9. 9. CRUNCH TIME
  10. 10. In conclusion – let’s simplify. • Make your own way (and try to bring others with you) • Use the tools at your disposal (your employer has a duty to you) • Be true to yourself (have integrity, and respect for others) • Leave room to enjoy life outside the office (work to live) The result: Happier, healthier, skilled testers!
  11. 11. THANK YOU! @neilstudd

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