Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Episode 231 Snippets: Harry McIntire of SPORTFIVE

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 56 Ad

Episode 231 Snippets: Harry McIntire of SPORTFIVE

Download to read offline

On episode 231 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Harry McIntire, Director of Digital for SPORTFIVE (agency that works with the biggest sports teams and brands in the world helping with globalization, fan engagement, sponsorship, and more).

What follows is a collection of snippets from the podcast. To hear the full interview and more, check out the podcast on all podcast platforms and at www.dsmsports.net

On episode 231 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Harry McIntire, Director of Digital for SPORTFIVE (agency that works with the biggest sports teams and brands in the world helping with globalization, fan engagement, sponsorship, and more).

What follows is a collection of snippets from the podcast. To hear the full interview and more, check out the podcast on all podcast platforms and at www.dsmsports.net

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

More from Neil Horowitz (20)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Episode 231 Snippets: Harry McIntire of SPORTFIVE

  1. 1. @njh287; www.dsmsports.net On episode 231 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Harry McIntire, Director of Digital at SPORTFIVE (agency helping the world’s biggest and most recognizable sports teams and brands drive fan engagement globally, activate and sell sponsorships, and more). What follows is a collection of snippets from the podcast. To hear the full interview and more, check out the podcast on all podcast platforms and at www.dsmsports.net. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  2. 2. Harry’s Career Path “Well, I could make into a longwinded answer there. But the short version is I am a soccer fan. For me, sports is such an interesting vehicle to kind of change the world or have an impact on the world and soccer, I think is the one unique sport that can do that for anyone, given that all you need is yourself, because you could turn anything into a ball, you could turn anything into the goal post, you could find just a rock and another pair of them that you could make as the frame and you can use that and play with that by yourself, with a tennis ball, whatever it may be. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  3. 3. “So that idea of being able to bring a sport to others that can help them find the safe space or impact their world on a day-to-day through something fun and entertaining — that definitely inspires me. And bringing that to the US market is always the exciting thing as an American. So everything I've done up to now has pretty much been through that frame of reference and I will try to continue to do that as I go further in my career. I'm sure when we talk about different stops, whether going to a specific graduate school to being at Gilt Edge Soccer Marketing to Sportfive now or wherever else it was before all those places, everything was shaped to that perspective.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  4. 4. “I was supposed to go to college to play soccer because it's always been part of my life. When it was a couple of months before it wasl time to graduate high school and make the transition to college, I actually got hurt and it ended my playing career. But in that next year to two-year period, I was trying to kind of figure out myself more and what it meant when you weren't having training every single day or a game multiple days a week. “What I found was this passion to stay connected to the sport and impact the world around it. And that meant eventually diving headfirst into getting as many opportunities as I could. So that started with my university, Duquesne University and their athletics department, running the marketing for the men's and women's soccer teams there, and it kind of grew from there. That spiraled then into Learfield and from there into Relevent Sports into grad school with this vision to supporting Columbus Crew FC to then Gilt Edge and now Sportfive.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  5. 5. About what Harry did with the Columbus Crew while in school “So I wasn't a full-time employee of the organization, but when I was at grad school at Ohio University, we were trying to find different opportunities that we could get professional experience in. With my close friend and now colleague/boss Karim Fathi we really uncovered this chance to try and help the Crew grow within southeast Ohio where the university is based. “So we created a partnership with the soccer club and then created this entire street marketing grassroots organization that was built around trying to connect with potential fans all throughout southeastern Ohio. That meant we were driving from Athens, Ohio where we were to going on a local television station to talk about the team, to driving to [run a] table at a small town festival and bring the Crew to them a bit. It was a really interesting and exciting experience, and one that I think I can speak for myself and I would say Karim too, as well as others, that it was a really interesting learning experience for us. You were interacting on a one-on-one basis most often directly with someone right in front of you, so you got to see what was piquing the interest of potential fans, what was piquing interest to current fans, and what might excite them to try and go to a game or follow a team on social media, you name it.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  6. 6. On marketing a team locally vs. globally “I think there's probably a nuanced difference between A and B and whatever it might be in life. There's definitely a ton [of differences], but there's a lot of similarities also that may not have seemed obvious. So when I was working on the Premier League — and Premier League fandom in the US is so centralized around the bar experience, coming together in a local atmosphere and where you've got someone walking five minutes from their apartment, but you also might have someone drive an hour and a half so they could be a part of that bar experience with them. It really helped shape and understand when you're trying to drive community around a physical location, and how it all comes together. So on the Premier League side, I was working very heavily on the digital aspects, running their social channels, producing and directing different video series for them and trying to keep that frame of mind of what inspires that fan when, yeah, you can see it on Twitter, but they're a different type of personality [on Twitter] “So I think it did help frame that and I do try and keep that in mind of what is the behavior that people have, yes online, but also physically, and how can we then merge those together to create a more accurate fan profile for someone when they're trying to create what that future or next level fan really looks like.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  7. 7. On building fan communities around the sport or league vs. teams “So two things come to mind when you say that — one, it's so interesting over here and especially trying to explain it to European colleagues or European friends, what soccer fans are like in America is because it's so different than what the rest of the world experiences. And it's different because over here everything is so siloed. Liga MX fandom is totally siloed from MLS, from Premier League and La Liga. Yes, there are definitely overlapping segments that go into each one, but just because you are a fan of soccer doesn't mean you have a team in every league. That would be a logistical nightmare to support all of your teams. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  8. 8. “So there are these nuanced differences in how you support your different teams in specific leagues because of the time zones that they're occurring in. If you're an MLS and you're not getting up at six in the morning to go and watch Liverpool play because you're not a Premier League fan potentially. So your idea of setting an alarm clock on a Friday night to wake up earlier than you might for work and then go and brush your teeth, shower and drive to a bar or just sit on your couch is a totally different experience than, say, getting ready at 4:00 PM to drive over to Red Bull Arena and watch your team play. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  9. 9. “So there's definitely these silos of differences and you can find conversation points of commonality. But also there are very distinct areas where it's hard to find that because it's totally different how a college basketball fan of Kentucky may not be able to do that with a diehard fan of the Memphis Grizzlies, even though their teams are realistically not that far apart geographically in the country. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  10. 10. “But at the same time where it's interesting and there is this natural commonality and this bond of being a fan of the sport or the league in particular. I think the perfect representation of what this is in America is the Premier League Fan Fest. They actually just had one in Philadelphia this past weekend [in mid-October], and it looks stunning. I was lucky enough to work on, I think, the first five or six of these that ever came to market over here, which is where NBC just brings that College GameDay atmosphere into a specific city. They've got the broadcast team there onsite, tons of different activations, and a really stunning, aesthetically pretty backdrop in one of the biggest cities in the country. You'll have 15,000 fans come through a very small area like a bar plus its surrounding street area to just the shadow of Fenway Park or wherever it might have been, and come together just to experience the Premier League together. They're gonna get in line; gates won't open until 6:30 AM on Saturday morning, but the people will be in line by midnight the night before so they can do the first ones in, and they're just sitting there talking about how excited they are just to consume the Premier League with so many other fans. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  11. 11. “So there is this interesting bond that forms as a soccer fan because you're a fan of the same sport that is a bit niche still, and you can have this kind of a natural commonality of having to search hard to find all the best information on your favorite team or see what all the transfer rumors are because you're not getting it on SportsCenter, you're not getting it on ESPN, you're not getting it on all these traditional outlets in the same way you're getting after the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL and so on… “For me, I think that makes it really exciting because you've got this natural inroad with someone, but also in a way, you have this area where maybe you can kind of grow together through educating each other by not necessarily knowing everything right off the bat about every single league or team that exists.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  12. 12. About creating that sense of community while also putting the players and clubs out front for fans, too “The fan experience in my mind is not one that can only be developed through the physical environment or just solely through the digital one, it all has to come together and work in a collaborative way and for everyone's favorite marketing buzzword — through synergy, through synergistic effort. And when we are trying to do different activations on a day-to-day in digital, we are always thinking about, okay, how can we grow the relationship this fan has with a club, with a league, with a brand, you name it, and being able to understand the root of that relationship allows us to connect with them and push them up the fandom escalator. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  13. 13. “But there's only so far it can go. You need to have that physical compliment. I think an interesting example is BVB, so Borussia Dortmund, the second-biggest team in Germany. They are a top 15 biggest club in the world in global soccer, home to many iconic American soccer players, and what the club wants to do over here in the United States is really connect to them on day-to-day basis, which we can go ahead and do on BlackYellow, the English language, social channels, which we run here at Sportfive and have done so for a few years now. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  14. 14. “And while [social] is an amazing place to create everyday touchpoints with them, we also need to have that physical compliment. So a very real example is just a couple of weeks ago, I think September 11th in Times Square in Manhattan, we put on a popup event with Street Soccer USA, [an] amazing organization that was looking to give back to the community through soccer. It was this amazingly powerful event that had some of the key stakeholders in the New York Metro market come in, play soccer for a good cause and create an unbelievable atmosphere for fans of the club to come together and watch this tournament while also being able to go ahead and support the club they love. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  15. 15. “This is just such an interesting touchpoint for someone who has only experienced the club in a digital format, and flying over to Germany may seem like such an incomprehendable idea that being able to have this kind of middle ground allows them to develop that inroad, but maybe also take that stuff to one day, be inspired to [say] ‘You know what? I'm gonna go get that passport. I'm gonna go book those flights and I'm gonna find myself a Signal Iduna Park with the yellow wall because how could I not because I've had everything brought back to this point and I need it in my life?’” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  16. 16. About what it means to localize a club’s fan development for fans abroad “It's a really good point because fandom in Germany versus fandom in the US for BVB — there are definite differences in the way that people consume the sport or the way that they consume the club, really. And for us, when we try and think about, okay, how can we try and tailor the strategy to be a localized one instead of just a generic one, it all starts every single time with becoming a product expert. That's the only way we try and think about it. So every single thing we do, whoever is working on — whether it's a team or a brand, a league, you name it — they have to know everything there is to ever know about this. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  17. 17. “So the folks who work on BVB on a day-to-day basis, I mean they could be the club historian. When they join our team, it's probably a hilarious experience for them of what onboarding is like because of the kind of wringer that we put them through and the level of depth that they have to know, because to be able to appreciate the greatness of Marco Reus right now, or even know how to tailor how much content should be about Gio Reyna in the US market, you need to appreciate the striked partnerships in the sixties that formed the fandom that has the older generation still entrenched with the club and are still loving the current crop. So they need to know every single thing that there is possible to know. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  18. 18. “Another client of ours is Flamengo, for example, the biggest team in South America…When we onboarded with them, if we didn't go to this depth, we would’ve quickly (had a) problem. Because in social media and sports, one of the most common things you'll see across every single feed is a team dropping a fire emoji. That seems inconsequential, like, of course. Why wouldn't I do that? [But] the case of Flamengo was about 10-15 years ago in their academy, there was a fire and lives were lost. If we didn't know that and understand how important in the club's history this fire was, we would've gone and used that. But we know now to never even think twice about using that [emoji] because it would be insensitive to fans. It wouldn't feel right to do that. It wouldn't be as if we appreciated their club in the same way they did. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  19. 19. “So us becoming these product experts, which in the sense is the club itself and everything that's ever happened with it is for us the most paramount thing and we use that for the basis of all things that we consider success. Then that can allow us to be able to tailor strategies because we know how a fan will think because we've studied so much; we are as big a fan as they are, if not even more than some fans, just because of the level of passion that we've committed to become a part of the history of the club.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  20. 20. On the varying nature of fandom in different locations “There are always gonna be similarities that are gonna take up maybe the majority of what fandom is across different cultures. That's what makes the world beautiful is that every single location really around the planet has its own uniqueness to it. And because of that, the fandom is then defined in a unique way in every single market. Even an East coast fan in the US is gonna have a different cultural perspective of how they consume it ever so slightly than say, someone on the West coast. You wanna watch BVB and a 9:30am kick on the East coast, that’s 6:30am on the West coast. That's a totally different way of how you're approaching your weekend the way consuming it and what you're doing after… Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  21. 21. “It goes beyond that of American culture is so inherently different than Chinese culture, German culture, English culture, you name it that is gonna create these little different intricacies that localized marketing will always be able, when done right, be able to tap into and make a fan feel appreciated, which is always the goal. Because people wanna be heard. We're not here selling pharmaceuticals, trying to drive the bottom line every single little which way; of course, these are our businesses and they are big businesses, but they're cultural representations of the local identity and certain areas. So being able to speak to someone, having them feel heard, having them feel appreciated is such an important thing because that's what's gonna turn someone from a casual into a hardcore [fan], or from someone who is interested into a casual and so on.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  22. 22. About players being the primary entry point and basis of fandom vs. club “There probably is a ceiling [to one’s athlete-based team fandom] in some capacity, but it doesn't mean you can't kinda push through it; it's one that you can definitely break through. When we think about players, it's a no-brainer to try and tap into [them] because look at the social following of players compared to teams and they'll always dominate engagement and total follower count. So we would be missing the boat if we weren't trying to tap into the personalities of these players, the background of these players and trying to use them as brand extensions for the club. Even if they're gonna leave at some point in the future, that's okay. They still have their shared history with the entity. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  23. 23. “Of course, there's always gonna be a fine balance with how the player is performing with, how the relationship is with the club, their relationship with the fans, et cetera, but that's always something to tap into. For us, the one thing we always try to keep in mind too is fans are smart. They do research on their own because they're just excited and interested in the club. If we were marketing to the US market by just putting Gio Reyna in every single place possible, we'd be missing the boat because there are people who became fans of the club because of Gio or because of Christian [Pulisic]. But at the same time, they're now BVB fans. They love Marco Reus, the guy who joined the academy at such a young age and has become the face of the club and is one of the best players on the planet at his peak form. And being able to tempt into that and the greater narratives is where it all leads to. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  24. 24. “So yes, the player might be a vehicle at the beginning to try and get someone excited about a club, but it's not the end goal. The end goal is how you turn into a fan of the club itself. I think a good example is it's not even just the players, it's the people who represent the club publicly. And when I say that, I mean notable public fans. So when we help the New York Jets internationalize to the UK market, as they were one of the winners of the [NFL’s international marketing rights for the UK], one of the first things we tried to do was work with Christian [Pulisic]. It was a no-brainer. They were going to play in London right after winning this [and] Christian, the biggest male soccer name for the United States on the planet plays for one of the biggest teams on the planet in London and the team was going there — like, Okay, what are we doing? How are we getting Christian to this game knowing he's such a big Jets fan, even though he's from Hershey, Pennsylvania and you’d be shocked to know that, but knowing the little detail put us in such a great spot because now we can work with him to try and communicate the message of the NFL game of what the Jets are in that market and have this soft entry into potential fans. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  25. 25. “So then trying to collaborate with Chelsea or other Premier League clubs in the back of it, it all extends…You find those organic touchpoints, you find the two brothers on the Jets, they are from Birmingham, Alabama; well, there's Birmingham City, and Peaky Blinders, how do we try and bridge that gap into something that's more formal between Birmingham City or between Peaky Blinders because of that natural connection? So even if it's a very obvious and famous person like Christian, there's also those kind of more nuanced, less obvious ones that become those organic touchpoints that can become long term connection spots that you can then play into and develop as those extensions of the club.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  26. 26. On international fans understanding the rules and minutiae of the sport “If you come across the easy answer to that, please let me know. Because it's not black and white. It's one of those things that's kind of hard to understand or hard to just wrap your head around on how youre try to break down a potential answer to it. So when I think about American sports leagues, not even just the NFL expanding overseas, it's really an interesting proposition. I mean, what is it, two, three decades ago at this point, NFL Europe attempted to try and get early inroads over there and it ended up not working out as well, but then you've got London games going on, you've got other sports leagues doing similar [initiatives]. But it's interesting to see how it's progressed and I think it would be incorrect to assume that you can get someone who's willing to open up the rulebook, take a test, and prove that they have NFL knowledge or NBA knowledge just because they want to be able to consume the sport better. You have to go step by step by step. You need to get them on the escalator to fandom and then move them up one at a time. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  27. 27. “So having an engaged social digital feed is going to be the lowest barrier to entry to get someone to be like, Oh, that's fun. You might come across maybe that witty meme that you thought was funny, so, okay let me throw a follow on this account. Now you're paying attention a bit and because you're not just pandering to the lowest common denominator, but you're authentically telling the history of the club and then you're authentically trying to connect through education where you're able to then help people who are starting earlier in their fan journey to move up. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  28. 28. “It all cycles together in a way. And when you've got the London game, etc., it just pushes it. When I think about social, it's like that daily grind, that pebble, if you will, that's just building up and you just gotta keep doing it day after day after day. You know, you're looking six months from now, you're gonna be so impressed that you built a mountain of pebbles, but you shouldn't forget they can have those tentpole moments where you can build a mountain purely by doing something amazing and massive. And that's what those NFL London equivalents get to be and you get to see everyone coming out. “But if you ever go to an NFL game, it's an interesting experience. It's almost like going to an international summer soccer friendly over here in the States. You go to the game and you see a jersey of every team. It's a hilarious thing to think of someone who, if you're going to say a Chargers game or a Giants game, you would never be caught dead wearing a Kansas City Chiefs or Tampa Bay Bucs one, but because those teams are great, you're gonna see as many of those jerseys in the stands because for them this is the one touch point that they have to be able to consume the sport in person. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  29. 29. “So just creating those kinds of tentpole moments that can collaborate with those pebble ones, so pebbles vs. boulders in a way, it allows it all to synchronize together. And I know an amazing [example] is the Chicago Bulls, also a client [of Sportfive]. Our French digital team at Sportfive recently launch Le Chicago Bulls, which is a French Instagram account for the organization and it's in an effort to help the club take that kind of pebble approach day by day by day, build those inroads, develop fans organically so that way by the time the Paris game comes around next year, there’ll be this engaged community around the Bulls that will just be clamoring for this opportunity to finally see them play. And I think it'll be a really unique experience, and I think it's very clever by the Bulls to try and create this type of [desire] for them, and it's just the beginning. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  30. 30. “For people who may be wondering, Well, does this actually pan out, like it’s kind of hard to see the results of this, you only [need to] look at the soccer organizations from Europe that have spent and invested the most money in the American market over the past 10 to 15 years — there is a direct correlation with the most popular clubs over here. Yes, of course you can’t pull out every single little detail so you know 100% truly it's because of the marketing investment, because of course Liverpool has done amazing in the past couple of years so of course they're gonna have more fans, but at the same time when you see that true commitment to the market over a long time horizon, you're able to see the results pop up. And when you can get in before other people are in there and sweep up the market before others have a chance to saturate it, you're gonna be positioned for the long term. There's no other time than really when it's a blue ocean compared to a red ocean for market acquisition.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  31. 31. On balancing a social and content strategy to reach and engage new fans vs. serving existing fans and increasing avidity “That diversity and content mix is so essential, so it's great you brought it up. For us, it goes back to the point I made before — it all starts with education. You have to know every little thing there yourself, possibly know more about the club you work for, the league you work for the brand, you work for, whoever it may be — and this will put you in a position so you can understand how you should be communicating to, yes, your hardcore fans, but also the wider mass market where if something pops off through virality by getting pickup on the ‘For You’ page [or] by people just logging on Twitter and smashing retweet there's that ability to understand, okay, this is gonna go over with both demographics. Or you can play into that nuance of like, okay, I know how the hardcore fans are gonna react to this and they're gonna react positively, but I also know that new fans or potential new fans will be curious by it and want to engage more. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  32. 32. “So it's all about being able to understand to an insane person's level of knowledge your client so much that you can then tailor that content mix, what your content pillars are gonna be, how much you double down on one versus the other on a certain day of the week based on the performance, based on players and what they're doing on the field, etc. So it's a huge map of millions of little pieces moving together, sometimes not in the way you like, but moving together and you have to kind of see how this is reacting in real-time and plug and play them as you need.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  33. 33. On the end game and revenue goals for international fans “So if you asked this today versus 10 years from now, five years from now, I guarantee these answers will be a bit different. But at the moment I would say it's interesting. You're gonna have different product offerings that you're gonna have to try and monetize yourself in an international market versus one in person because you can't, like you said, rely on the default of ticket sales and you can't then create a different type of ticket package to get people to go to more games or upgrade to better seats and so on. So you have to get a bit more creative. So I think merch is a very obvious one where people kinda lean into it; like, if we build more fans, we can sell more jerseys at a higher margin and connect with people on an ongoing basis, because then they also have that very physical representation of the club with them, literally touching them when they wear it. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  34. 34. “So merch is a very obvious one, but it goes further. It goes into the idea of yes, being able to actually get fans to fly over, whether it be in groups or on their own and so on. It goes back to you drive more fans, you are able to get more people to watch. So it's like a Trojan horse a bit — more people watching means more broadcasters want it, more broadcasters wanna pay more for it, and the leagues are able to sell their rights for more money to trickle down to the different clubs. There's a very cyclical effect to that, so that's another key one I would say, when you're trying to make these investments in different markets and that it funnels into. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  35. 35. “The one that's interesting that we'll see how it kind of plays out in the next 5, 10, 15, 20 years is everything blockchain-related. Blockchain technology and what's based on there is going to be very interesting on how it develops, changes the way that people interact online or in online environments because you are going into a world where you can have proof of ownership, whether it may be, I don't think the future version is a simple JPEG that is on blockchain, but that idea of being able to now own something and you can more clearly represent your digital personality that can follow you anywhere you go just like you can do in the physical world, will be a really interesting development in how it's monetized and grows and is going to be something I cannot predict, I'm far too dumb to be able to see that. But I think I've understood enough from being deep in the space for about two years now it's happening whether or not people like it and just the way it's gonna manifest itself is a bit TBD.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  36. 36. Harry’s favorite memory of working with Duquesne soccer “So this is not a part of the normal day-to-day responsibilities I would've had but of course in sports, you wear a lot of hats. There was a day when our PA announcer called in sick like 30 minutes or an hour before the game and that left only a couple individuals who could announce the game that day. So I quickly volunteered because when else would I have this chance to do it? And I got to announce a game in my junior year of college, and I went a little aggressive and gave the full-length goal calls whenever there were goals, which was not the normal thing to do, and everyone was a little bit confused in the stands, but I had fun and I think everyone else enjoyed it at least.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  37. 37. The lesson[s] Harry learned from working at Avis Car Rental during his undergrad in college “Working at a rental car company, I would say first and foremost, next time you rent a car, just be actually nice to them because I can promise you they're having a tough day back there. I worked at Avis to make some cash when in I was in college given that I had two other internships in sports and both were unpaid. I did it just for money, but I learned a lot during that time. There were some amazing, hilarious stories, which I can tell you another time, but the biggest learnings I had, I would say it's probably two. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  38. 38. “One is the very simple and obvious thing of just be nice to people. Like, it's not that hard to be nice to someone. The amount of times where someone would come and they would have a series of demands — because renting a car requires a lot of information about someone and doesn't always pass the tests that a car company needs, so it leaves a very serious, uncomfortable moment for some people. And when it becomes aggressive trying to attack someone, yes, there are definitely moments where people try to grab things out of your hand or shout at you, scream at you, curse at you — just in those moments, remember that when people are nice to you, reward them because they are being a good human. And that's what life is about, caring for others, being there for them, and appreciating them. So it definitely helped to keep that in mind. And whenever now I'm at a car place or any customer service interaction, that is always in the back of my head because it's so important. Because I know the call before that was such a tough one, that someone did not give them the time, desire, did not give them the appreciation they deserved. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  39. 39. “But the other [lesson] is I guess in a Mr. Miyagi-type sense and that's that you always dry the car from the top down. So like wax on, wax off a bit. But it's an idea of work with gravity, and I think it's like a metaphor for life in a way to work with the tide, work with the way things are flowing where if you try and dry that car, which I did many times at the beginning, from the bottom up because you're already crouching at that point — all you have to do is go and do it again then because by the time you get higher up and you get around the car, the water from the top of the vehicle has now dripped down and you gotta go do it all over again. “So taking the time to dry it from the top down instead of bottom up was literally a life-changing moment for becoming a car washer and in a way, and yeah, I think it has interesting parallels to life.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  40. 40. The MLS team besides the Crew whose marketing or digital strategy Harry most admires and why “So I think there are a few teams that do a really good job. I think if I were to go holistic across the board, the one that stands out for me and what I appreciate most and how they're kinda hitting on every single pillar of the marketing mix is LAFC. They have such a clear and defined brand, it's beautiful. And like you see that black and gold you know what you're looking at and you see it come through in every asset they have. It doesn't have to be so overt that it feels like a brick hit you in the head, but that subtle nuance with the way they kinda edit their photos in light and the way they might color grade a video, the way they might focus on a certain shot panning in a certain way so it has a bit more black in it instead of bright lights of the whites that’s not as authentic to the brand — all those little intricacies I think are so interesting and peels over into every little aspect of LAFC material that that exists. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  41. 41. “But I think there are a few others that do cool stuff like that. [Ones that] come to mind talking out loud, because I definitely have scrolled far too many MLS feed aggressively over the years, I think of the Galaxy crushing it in different clever moments. Like, a couple years ago when Cameo was starting to pop off, the Galaxy hired [then Galaxy player] Mark-Anthony Kaye and [LAFC commentator] Max Bretos on Cameo to give a shout out to a player who just won their big soccer game. And the big soccer game person they were shouting out was like players on the Galaxy. So the Galaxy tweeted that at full time of a player saying, ‘Congratulations, Zlatan on his big game,’ and they didn't know that because it was through Cameo. It was such a clever little dig that played into the rivalry and so much, I was floored. It was just like, sometimes you gotta stand up and applaud such brilliant marketing. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  42. 42. “But the other one I think is interesting too, before I go too far on a tangent, is Angel City FC. They're like the same boat as LAFC — the way they've defined a brand and leaned into a clear identity that is not just color-wise, but also kind of a lifestyle, like believing in equal rights and female empowerment and championing women has been staggering. It's almost like, oh, there must be men leading every other team out there as to why no NWSL team has leaned in so heavy over the years. But how they've been able to do it has just been so impressive…They should be so proud. I know they are, but from the outside looking in, I think the rest of the marketing world within soccer is just like kudos to them because they've done such a phenomenal job to build a fanbase and excitement, too.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  43. 43. On international club accounts activating and expressing values “Yeah, I think it's really important, but it comes down to, a bit of theme from my ramblings today, is it’s all about education, you gotta know your history of your club. It would be really off if the club has had a history of racism issues amongst fans, and then they try and take out of nowhere a stance on a sensitive topic that's -related to race. It would feel so inauthentic. In that case you need to do deeper inroads and you're not talking about it [and] earning the right to talk about it in a way, to try and make systematic and structural changes in society, then you can. But for an organization who has from day one been committed to those kinds of things — like Borussa Dortmund and through their Borussia Dortmund campaigns and really tried to own being supportive of everyone in their community, no matter who they are, what background they're from, no matter what it is. Then leading that conversation and not just reacting to something is important because in that case, waiting for it to happen is not doing the right thing. You need to be out there proactively in the market trying to make changes and instead of just waiting for that reactive chance. So you need to know everything there is to know so you can know how to make a clean and concise plan. But when that comes, it'll depend on what the history is and what kind of data is in front of you to make a decision .” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  44. 44. Harry’s number one general guiding principle or tip for teams seeking to develop fans globally, in countries outside of their own “Know your product inside and out. You have to become that product expert. I don't care if you work in sports; you wanna market Kleenex? I wanna know every little detail there is to know about a Kleenex tissue. I wanna know why society at one point started calling tissues in general Kleenexes, like where did that come from? What led to that moment happening? Like, why is your tissue softer than Cottonelle or whoever else makes tissues? You need to know all this stuff so then you can be able to market effectively and speak to the relevant target markets. And I think that goes for teams. I've said it too many times today, but it's truly what I believe.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  45. 45. Besides Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Twitter, which social platform is Harry highest on? “I would consider it mainstream, but you didn't mention it, so I'm gonna use it as my answer — YouTube. I say YouTube because YouTube, that platform took so long to get to this point in my mind. But I grew up with YouTube just being a dominant place where you watch shoes as a kid to Charlie bit my finger to FIFA YouTubers these days or whatever it may be, and we just go there to consumer video. We never like think so strategically about to understand what it is. But the reason Google acquired it so many years ago is because it is a search engine at its heart. It's the same thing as Google, except instead of producing links, it produces videos and that type of way to kind of gamify SEO or the ability to connect with fans in such an organic way where they're not even realizing it is so invaluable. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  46. 46. “And then if you take it to the next level of, like, you can go on Twitter all day, tweet all day, get tons of engagement, but you know what? It's hard to monetize. You know what YouTube is? It's easy to monetize. So when you're in Q4 and all the big Fortune 500 companies wanna spend oodles of money on CPMs, when you have a YouTube channel that's monetized where you're talking large revenue streams, that can come in on a daily basis when you've got an engaged fanbase there. “I don't think actually a lot of organizations have found a way to use YouTube effectively on a day-to-day basis. There are a few things that we're actually trying to creatively explore on how to split ad revenue and create content with third party outlets. But for me, I think this is the one people kind of forget that there is just this unbelievable behemoth that can be monetized and drive clear effect on the bottom line, just sitting there waiting to be appreciated. But it's not because it just takes a lot, so it's kinda just gone by the wayside a little bit.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  47. 47. Harry’s favorite social media content piece or campaign from his time at Sportfive so far “It’s the Hisense campaign we're working on. So they're an official World Cup sponsor; there are maybe like eight of them that exist because it's such a big ordeal to be able to take on that opportunity. And for us to be able to work on the official World Cup campaign for one of the coolest brands that exists out there and one of the most tech-forward ones, it's just like a dream come true. I mean, this is gonna sound overly dramatic, but that idea of, like, I've had the chance to work on my dream book of clients that I was hoping to maybe accomplish by the time I retired and by the age of 29 I've already had the chance to do it, it's something that I could try and still pinch myself about on a day-to-day basis. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  48. 48. “It's not a cherry on top, it’s like a whole other sundae with the cherry on top be to do it for the World Cup in front of bright lights with everyone. We have people who will be on site in Qatar working this activation like, I just didn't think the day would come outside of maybe like, someone just appeasing me when the World Cup eventually comes to the US and is like, fine, here you go, you can hang out in your corner and work on this. But like, to get to do it already and under such magnitude, I’m just forever grateful for that.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  49. 49. The best meal to get in New York and where to get it “As someone who grew up in the New York, New Jersey, metro area, and bagels coursed through my veins at this point, I would default to Brooklyn Bagel. That's in Chelsea and Manhattan. I like their everything bagel toasted with egg and cream cheese is just like, and of course you gotta get scallions cream cheese, it is to die for. But if you want a proper meal, so say it's a little bit later in the day or you wanna sit down instead of scarfing down while we walk, or sit at a table on the street. I would say [sic], also in Chelsea…that just opened; like a Michelin star chef opened a pizza joint that like has this open-air fire, brick oven pizza. I mean, I left 10 pounds heavier and I was never more grateful to be able to say that.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  50. 50. Harry’s favorite or most memorable thing he learned from his education at Ohio University’s sports business program “So, like everyone who went to Ohio, I love that place. I mean a lot. I definitely am not in the, the shoes I am right now without that place. And I think in particular, Jim Kahler, who was the director of the program when I was there; I mean, he did so much for every single person there. I just will be forever grateful. But the thing I learned, which, I don't think I went in thinking that — I thought this is the number one ranked program in the world for sports business. Not Harvard, not Columbia, not any other Ivy League, but it's Ohio University in Athens, like, what is going on? Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  51. 51. “So I thought I was gonna be some incredible statistician, I would learn through some MBA class or something else in the textbook, if you will. But I walked away understanding how important people are around you and good people are around you. It was such an amazing atmosphere to be there and be around 20 other individuals in my class who were all driven to want to build an impressive career in sports and change the way the industry is for the better. “I left there and I must talk to every single person, I think, still, on a regular basis. I'm currently in Chicago traveling to go to a wedding for a classmate of mine who I lived with in Ohio and when I first moved to Chicago, when I lived here a few years ago, I lived with her as well. Like to be able to go to her wedding now and now see a bunch of my old classmates is so staggering. And as a side note to all that, why people are so important and why it's so important in life to be nice to other people and appreciate them and care for them is my first job in the industry that was my first real full-time job I got because there was a woman in a class above me at Ohio who had taken a job in the industry. Her boss also went to Ohio and his old classmate at Ohio worked at a soccer-specific marketing agency and was looking to hire someone. So when he told his old classmate, who then told the woman on his team who was in the class above me, she was like, ‘Oh, well I know the perfect person for you. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  52. 52. “And so through three separate connections at Ohio University that I had, I'd only talked to one of them before, [I had] an opportunity and found my way and I was able to take that. And now my next role in the industry was the same thing — someone I was literally roommates with in grad school is now my boss. He is one of my closest friends in the world, and I moved immediately across the country when the opportunity came to work with him. And it was like, just like being around the great people who inspire you and motivate you is just like such a priceless thing.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  53. 53. Who will win this year’s MLS Cup and Premier League title? “Both my answers are gonna make me feel terrible on the inside as a [New York] Red Bulls fan and as a Liverpool fan, I hate to say it, but I think that [Manchester] City is gonna walk away with the title this year in the PL. And then for MLS, the Philly Union, I just think they're too good. Both those teams are just so good.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  54. 54. Harry’s Social Media All-Star to Follow “Maybe a different answer than a normal one here, so I'm not gonna shout out, say, someone who's entrenched in the industry, but rather a creator, someone by the name of Pablo Rochat (@pablorochat). He must be one of the most creative people to follow on a platform. He just innovates the way that content is done. It's hard to kinda say. The things that you forget because you become unconscious about it when you're posting or creating content, he's paying attention and is taking this perspective, flipping outside and dissecting it and creating content. “You're like [it’s] just hilarious because you forget that it's a part of how your content creation process is. Or the way he breaks it down. It's just like he understands the human form so well andit's an entertaining style as well as one that’s definitely inspiring for the next content piece that people look for.” Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  55. 55. Where to find Harry and Sportfive on social/digital media Find Sportfive on Twitter and Instagram @sportfiveagency and on LinkedIn Find Harry @HarryMcIntire on Instagram and I think @MacIntyre_Harry on Twitter. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire
  56. 56. @njh287; www.dsmsports.net Thanks again to Harry for being so generous with his time to share his knowledge, experience, and expertise with me! For more content and episodes, subscribe to the podcast, follow me on LinkedIn and on Twitter @njh287, and visit www.dsmsports.net. Best Of The Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast Episode 231: Harry McIntire

×