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The Rise of
Arctic Plants
By Neil Burnard
Climate Change
Its impact can be felt
everywhere
An
interesting
side-effect:
It’s been creating more
vegetation in arctic regions
with the total amount of
decomposition st...
REALLY?!?!
A recent study at Lund
University in Sweden looked
to examine this and found
that organisms like bacteria
and f...
How?
• Much of the carbon and nitrogen on Earth is stored in arctic
ecosystems, in the perpetually frozen ground!
• When t...
What does it mean?
• Most current climate change models don’t consider
the connection between increased shrub
vegetation f...
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The Rise of Arctic Plants, by Neil Burnard

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In arctic regions, climate change has had an interesting side effect, as the previously frozen ground releases nitrogen and oxygen, reducing decomposition and causing a growth in plant life.

Published in: Environment
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The Rise of Arctic Plants, by Neil Burnard

  1. 1. The Rise of Arctic Plants By Neil Burnard
  2. 2. Climate Change Its impact can be felt everywhere
  3. 3. An interesting side-effect: It’s been creating more vegetation in arctic regions with the total amount of decomposition steadily reducing, which could actually inhibit global warming
  4. 4. REALLY?!?! A recent study at Lund University in Sweden looked to examine this and found that organisms like bacteria and fungi are triggered to break down particularly nutritious parts of shrubbery
  5. 5. How? • Much of the carbon and nitrogen on Earth is stored in arctic ecosystems, in the perpetually frozen ground! • When this ground warms up due to climate change, it releases these and more shrubs start to grow instead of the typical moss, which is hard to break down! • Shrubs have leaves and roots that are easy to break down and secrete sugar! • The researchers found that decomposition organisms such as bacteria and fungi are triggered to look for nutrient-rich organic materials with more nitrogen, which reduces overall decomposition
  6. 6. What does it mean? • Most current climate change models don’t consider the connection between increased shrub vegetation from ongoing climate change and soil becoming less nutritious! • Completely throws a wrench in current climate change models

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