Kickstart Your Health

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With a 21-Day Weight Loss Kickstart, in just three short weeks you’ll get fast results: drop pounds, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, improve blood sugar, and more. Dr. Barnard will teach you how to make the best food choices and get your body on the fast track to better health.

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Kickstart Your Health

  1. 1. A New Approach to Food and Health Neal Barnard, MD President, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine George Washington University School of Medicine
  2. 2. A Lesson from Japan
  3. 3. Diabetes Prevalence in Japan In adults over age 40: Prior to 1980: 1-5% Kuzuya T. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Japan compiled from literature. Diab Res Clin Practice. 1994;24 Suppl:S15-S21.
  4. 4. Rising Fat Intake in Japan Fat (grams/day) 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1955 1965 Murata M. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72(suppl):1379S-83S. 1975 1985 1994
  5. 5. Falling Carbohydrate Intake in Japan Carbohydrate (grams/day) 430 400 370 340 310 280 250 1955 1965 Murata M. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72(suppl):1379S-83S. 1975 1985 1994
  6. 6. Overweight and Obesity in Japan Prevalence in Men % % % % BMI 25-29.9 BMI ≥ 30 % % Yoshiike N. Obes Rev 2002;3:183-90. Yoshiike N. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2002;11(Suppl 8):S727-31. %
  7. 7. Diabetes Prevalence in Japan In adults over age 40: Prior to 1980: By 1990: 1-5% 11-12% Kuzuya T. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Japan compiled from literature. Diab Res Clin Practice. 1994;24 Suppl:S15-S21.
  8. 8. A Lesson from the U.S.
  9. 9. U.S. Per Capita Meat Intake (lb) 2004 201.5 lb 220 200 2010 188.8 lb 180 160 140 1909 123.9 lb 120 100 80 (Includes red meat, poultry, and fish) 60 40 20 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 Source:US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FoodConsumption/FoodAvailSpreadsheets.htm#mtpcc, accessed August 15, 2009.
  10. 10. U.S. Per Capita Chicken Intake (lb) 2006 60.9 lb 60 2010 58.0 lb 50 40 30 1909 10.4 lb 20 10 0 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 Source:US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FoodConsumption/FoodAvailSpreadsheets.htm#mtpcc, accessed August 15, 2009.
  11. 11. Diabetes Prevalence 1994
  12. 12. Diabetes Prevalence 1995
  13. 13. Diabetes Prevalence 1996
  14. 14. Diabetes Prevalence 1997
  15. 15. Diabetes Prevalence 1998
  16. 16. Diabetes Prevalence 1999
  17. 17. Diabetes Prevalence 2000
  18. 18. Diabetes Prevalence 2001
  19. 19. Diabetes Prevalence 2002
  20. 20. Diabetes Prevalence 2003
  21. 21. Diabetes Prevalence 2004
  22. 22. Diabetes Prevalence 2005
  23. 23. Diabetes Prevalence 2006
  24. 24. Diabetes Prevalence 2007
  25. 25. Diabetes Prevalence 2008
  26. 26. Adventist Health Study – 2 60,903 participants, aged ≥30, enrolled 2002-2006 Tonstad S, et al. Type of vegetarian diet, body weight and prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2009;32:791-6.
  27. 27. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) N = 37,875; aged 20 – 97; enrolled 1993 - 1999 Spencer EA, et al. Diet and body mass index in 38,000 EPIC-Oxford meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans. Int J Obesity 2003;27:728-34.
  28. 28. Weight-Control Study 64 women Moderately to severely overweight Post-menopausal
  29. 29. Weight-Control Study Low-fat vegan diet No exercise 14-week study
  30. 30. Typical Day’s Meals Breakfast Blueberry pancakes or Oatmeal with cinnamon and raisins Half cantaloupe Rye toast with jam Lunch Chunky vegetable chili Garden salad with sesame dressing Snack Banana Dinner Lentil soup with crackers Linguine with artichoke hearts and seared oyster mushrooms Steamed broccoli
  31. 31. Weight-Control Study Low-fat vegan diet No exercise 14-week study
  32. 32. Weight-Control Study Low-fat vegan diet No exercise 14-week study → 13 lb average weight loss in 14 weeks Sustained weight loss for 2 years
  33. 33. How Does It Work?
  34. 34. Fiber Tricks the Brain Fiber tells the brain you’re full.
  35. 35. Getting the After-Meal “Burn”
  36. 36. Fat in cells slows your after-meal calorie burn.
  37. 37. Getting fat out of cells boosts your after-meal calorie burn.
  38. 38. Body Weight P-value < 0.0001 Am J Health Promotion, In pre
  39. 39. Waist Circumference P-value < 0.001 Am J Health Promotion, In pre
  40. 40. PCRM 2009 USDA 2011
  41. 41. Complete Nutrition Protein Calcium Vitamin B12
  42. 42. Beginning a Healthful Diet Step 1. Check out the possibilities
  43. 43. Foods to Try Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snack
  44. 44. Healthy Breakfasts • Cinnamon Raisin Oatmeal • Blueberry Pancakes • Hot Whole Wheat with Dates • Breakfast Scrambler • Fantastic Fruit Smoothie • Whole-Grain Bagel with Jam • Swiss Style Muesli • Slow Cooker Whole-Grain Porridge • Orange-Pineapple Crush
  45. 45. Lunches and Dinners • Chunky Vegetable Chili •Chuckwagon Stew • Seitan & Mushroom Stroganoff • Portobello Mushroom Steaks • Oven-Barbecued Tofu Steaks • Roadhouse Hash • Sweet & Sour Tempeh • Southern Beans & Greens • Seitan Cassoulet • Mandarin Stir-Fry • Stuffed Vegetable Rolls • Zucchini & Herb Calzones • Chili Bean Macaroni
  46. 46. Italian Cuisine
  47. 47. Mexican Cuisine
  48. 48. Chinese Cuisine
  49. 49. Fast-Food Options Veggie delight Bean burrito, hold the cheese
  50. 50. Beginning a Healthful Diet Step 1. Check out the possibilities Step 2. Do a 3-week test drive Optional: Use transition foods
  51. 51. Resources www.pcrm.org
  52. 52. PCRM.org
  53. 53. PCRM.org
  54. 54. PCRM.org

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