Relationships between green space quantity and 
perceived stress and mental wellbeing in deprived 
urban communities in Sc...
Outline 
• Introduction
– Background
– The GreenHealth Project
– Research Questions
• Methodology
– Study Design 
– Data A...
Background 
Urban Green Space and Health
Higher levels of residential green space have been associated with 
lower mortality rates, lo...
Urban Green Space and Health
Urban green space is more closely associated with health for those 
living in poverty/depriva...
Deprivation and Health in Scotland
Deprivation/inequality is a 
significant problem in Scotland, 
and is not improving
Deprivation and Health in Scotland
Deprivation/inequality is a 
significant problem in Scotland, 
and is not improving
UK ...
Deprivation and Health in Scotland
Deprivation/inequality is a 
significant problem in Scotland, 
and is not improving
UK ...
Deprivation and Health in Scotland
Image: Greenspace Scotland
Image: Greenspace Scotland
GreenHealth
• ‘The contribution of green and 
open space in public health and 
well‐being’
• Funded by the Scottish 
Gover...
Green Health: OPENspace & Heriot Watt 
• Examined the relationship between 
quantity, quality and accessibility of 
green ...
Green Health: OPENspace & Heriot Watt 
• Examined the relationship between 
quantity, quality and accessibility of 
green ...
Green Health: OPENspace & Heriot Watt 
• Examined the relationship between 
quantity, quality and accessibility of 
green ...
Household Survey Study: Research Questions
1. Is there a relationship 
between the amount of 
green space in the 
resident...
Household Survey Study: Research Questions
1. Is there a relationship 
between the amount of 
green space in the 
resident...
Methodology
Study Design
• Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire, 
June 2010
• Four deprived urban neighbourhoods,...
Study Design
• Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire, 
June 2010
• Four deprived urban neighbourhoods,...
Study Design
• Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire, 
June 2010
• Four deprived urban neighbourhoods,...
Study Design
• Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire, 
June 2010
• Four deprived urban neighbourhoods,...
Questionnaire Data 
• Health and wellbeing measures 
– Perceived Stress Scale, PSS (Cohen & Williamson, 1988)) 
– Mental W...
Questionnaire Data 
• Health and wellbeing measures 
– Perceived Stress Scale, PSS (Cohen & Williamson, 1988)) 
– Mental W...
Green Space Quantity Data (GIS)
GS Quantity 
(% unit area)
Ward
Hutton 
Land Use 
ClassZone
Green Space Quantity: (1) Ward
• UK CAS (Electoral 
District) Unit
• Parks, woodlands, 
scrub + other natural 
environment...
Green Space Quantity: (2) Zone
• Scottish ‘Data Zone’ Unit
• GS = as Ward (Parks, 
woodlands, scrub + 
other natural 
envi...
Green Space Quantity: (3) Hutton Land Use Class (HLUC)
• Scotland Green Space 
Map Typologies 
(‘PAN65’) 
• Public open sp...
View to Green space from the home
• Three point ordinal 
scale:
– No view
– Partial view
– Full view
• Recorded for each 
...
Data Analysis
• Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical, 
blocked)
– Each green space measure 
Data Analysis
• Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical, 
blocked)
– Each green space measure 
– Controll...
Data Analysis
• Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical, 
blocked)
– Each green space measure 
– Controll...
Data Analysis
• Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical, 
blocked)
– Each green space measure 
– Controll...
Results
Perceived stress (PSS) at each site
Mental wellbeing (SWEMBS) at each site 
Sample Characteristics 
• n = 305 (Pilton, Stobswell & Fintry; Craigmillar removed)
• Age
o 16 – 87 years
o Mean = 43.7 ye...
Green Space Quantity
Research Question 1
Is there a relationship 
between the amount of 
green space in the 
residential environment and 
perce...
Perceived Stress (PSS): was green space quantity a 
significant predictor?
(i) Analysis by Gender 
Perceived Stress (PSS): was green space quantity a 
significant predictor? 
(ii) At Home More Sub‐group, by Gender
Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity: 
At Home More sub‐group
Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.567, p < 0.01)
Partial Regression Plots
Residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs residuals 
of the target explanatory var...
Partial Regression Plots
Residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs residuals 
of the target explanatory var...
Partial Regression Plots
Residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs residuals 
of the target explanatory var...
Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity: 
‘At Home More’ sub‐group
Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.567, p < 0.01)
Green space cover...
Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity: 
‘At Home More’ sub‐group
Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.567, p < 0.01)          Women: n...
Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity: 
Women At Home More
Women: n = 43 (GS = n.s.)Differences between groups
o Escap...
Mental Wellbeing (SWEMWBS): was green space 
quantity a significant predictor? 
(i) Analysis by Gender
Mental Wellbeing (SWEMWBS): was green space quantity 
a significant predictor? 
(ii) At Home More Sub‐group, by Gender
Mental Wellbeing (SWEMWBS) and Green Space 
Quantity: At Home More sub‐group
Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.08, p < 0.01)           ...
Research Question 2
Is there a link between visual 
access to green space from 
home and perceived health 
and wellbeing?
View to green space from the home
• Perceived stress 
– No significant association 
(for any group)
View to green space from the home
• Perceived stress 
– No significant association 
(for any group)
• Mental wellbeing
– S...
View to green space from the home
• Perceived stress 
– No significant association 
(for any group)
• Mental wellbeing
– S...
View to green space 
• Physical Activity
– Significant positive 
association for women at 
home more group (r = .263 , 
p ...
View to green space
• Physical Activity
– Significant positive 
association for women at 
home more group (r = .263, 
p < ...
Summary
• Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked 
with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent me...
Summary
• Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked 
with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent me...
Summary
• Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked 
with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent me...
Summary
• Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked 
with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent me...
Summary
• Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked 
with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent me...
Conclusions
Green space in the residential environment is a factor contributing 
to the health and wellbeing of residents ...
Conclusions
Increasing green space coverage in areas where there is little could 
reduce stress levels and increase wellbe...
lynette.robertson@ed.ac.uk
c.ward‐thompson@ed.ac.uk
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Relationships between green space quantity and perceived stress and mental wellbeing in deprived urban communities in Scotland - Robertson et al (2013)

560 views

Published on

Presentation on the main findings of the GreenHealth (Green Health) Household Survey study, presented at the Environmental Design Research Association 'Healthy and Healing Places' conference (EDRA 44, Providence, Rhode Island, USA), May 2013.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
560
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
27
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Relationships between green space quantity and perceived stress and mental wellbeing in deprived urban communities in Scotland - Robertson et al (2013)

  1. 1. Relationships between green space quantity and  perceived stress and mental wellbeing in deprived  urban communities in Scotland Lynette Robertson, Catharine Ward Thompson, Jenny Roe,  Peter Aspinall, Rich Mitchell, David Miller  
  2. 2. Outline  • Introduction – Background – The GreenHealth Project – Research Questions • Methodology – Study Design  – Data Analysis • Results – Green Space Quantity  – View to Green Space  from Home • Summary • Conclusions
  3. 3. Background 
  4. 4. Urban Green Space and Health Higher levels of residential green space have been associated with  lower mortality rates, lower blood pressure and obesity levels,  and better self‐perceived health (e.g. Maas et al, 2006). 
  5. 5. Urban Green Space and Health Urban green space is more closely associated with health for those  living in poverty/deprivation (e.g. Mitchell & Popham, 2008)
  6. 6. Deprivation and Health in Scotland Deprivation/inequality is a  significant problem in Scotland,  and is not improving
  7. 7. Deprivation and Health in Scotland Deprivation/inequality is a  significant problem in Scotland,  and is not improving UK Poverty and Social Exclusion  (PSE) study: Poverty in Scotland at  worst levels in 30 years ‐ 1/3 of  population living in ‘multiple  deprivation’ (PSE UK, 2013)
  8. 8. Deprivation and Health in Scotland Deprivation/inequality is a  significant problem in Scotland,  and is not improving UK Poverty and Social Exclusion  (PSE) study: Poverty in Scotland at  worst levels in 30 years ‐ 1/3 of  population living in ‘multiple  deprivation’ (PSE UK, 2013) Still the ‘Sick man of Europe’  (Glasgow Centre for Population  Health, 2012) 
  9. 9. Deprivation and Health in Scotland Image: Greenspace Scotland
  10. 10. Image: Greenspace Scotland
  11. 11. GreenHealth • ‘The contribution of green and  open space in public health and  well‐being’ • Funded by the Scottish  Government • April 2008 – March 2012 (2013) • Led by The James Hutton  Institute  www.hutton.ac.uk/projects/green‐health www.greenspacescotland.org.uk/greenhealth‐conference
  12. 12. Green Health: OPENspace & Heriot Watt  • Examined the relationship between  quantity, quality and accessibility of  green space and health and  wellbeing in deprived urban  communities
  13. 13. Green Health: OPENspace & Heriot Watt  • Examined the relationship between  quantity, quality and accessibility of  green space and health and  wellbeing in deprived urban  communities • Two main studies 1. Cortisol  and green space quantity  (Ward Thompson et al; Roe et al)
  14. 14. Green Health: OPENspace & Heriot Watt  • Examined the relationship between  quantity, quality and accessibility of  green space and health and  wellbeing in deprived urban  communities • Two main studies 1. Cortisol  and green space quantity  (Ward Thompson et al; Roe et al) 2. Household Survey  o Perceived health and wellbeing and  green space quantity and quality o Green space accessibility and use  (including Conjoint analysis) o Perceptions of green space
  15. 15. Household Survey Study: Research Questions 1. Is there a relationship  between the amount of  green space in the  residential environment  and perceived stress and  mental wellbeing? 
  16. 16. Household Survey Study: Research Questions 1. Is there a relationship  between the amount of  green space in the  residential environment  and perceived stress and  mental wellbeing? 2. Is there a link between  visual access to green  space and perceived  health and wellbeing?
  17. 17. Methodology
  18. 18. Study Design • Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire,  June 2010 • Four deprived urban neighbourhoods, selected using Carstairs Deprivation Index and amount of green space coverage (low  and high) – Edinburgh: Pilton & Craigmillar – Dundee: Stobswell & Fintry • All residents > 16 years (Included people in work, cortisol  study = unemployed only) • Approximately 100 participants from each site (n = 406)
  19. 19. Study Design • Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire,  June 2010 • Four deprived urban neighbourhoods, selected using Carstairs Deprivation Index and amount of green space coverage (low  and high) – Edinburgh: Pilton & Craigmillar – Dundee: Stobswell & Fintry • All residents > 16 years (Included people in work, cortisol  study = unemployed only) • Approximately 100 participants from each site (n = 406)
  20. 20. Study Design • Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire,  June 2010 • Four deprived urban neighbourhoods, selected using Carstairs Deprivation Index and amount of green space coverage (low  and high) – Edinburgh: Pilton & Craigmillar – Dundee: Stobswell & Fintry • All residents > 16 years (Included people in work, cortisol  study = unemployed only) • Approximately 100 participants from each site (n = 406)
  21. 21. Study Design • Cross‐sectional CAPI‐administered household questionnaire,  June 2010 • Four deprived urban neighbourhoods, selected using Carstairs Deprivation Index and amount of green space coverage (low  and high) – Edinburgh: Pilton & Craigmillar – Dundee: Stobswell & Fintry • All residents > 16 years (Included people in work, cortisol  study = unemployed only) • Approximately 100 participants from each site (n = 406)
  22. 22. Questionnaire Data  • Health and wellbeing measures  – Perceived Stress Scale, PSS (Cohen & Williamson, 1988))  – Mental Wellbeing, SWEMWBS  ‐ Short Warwick‐Edinburgh Mental  Wellbeing Scale(Steward‐Brown et al., 2009) – Physical Activity   – General Health – Life Satisfaction • Green space use (frequency, purpose…) • Green space accessibility (distance, views) • Green space perceptions (amount, quality, safety…) • Other e.g. Life Event, Life Conditions • Demographics (age, work status etc.)
  23. 23. Questionnaire Data  • Health and wellbeing measures  – Perceived Stress Scale, PSS (Cohen & Williamson, 1988))  – Mental Wellbeing, SWEMWBS  ‐ Short Warwick‐Edinburgh Mental  Wellbeing Scale(Steward‐Brown et al., 2009) – Physical Activity   – General Health – Life Satisfaction • Green space use (frequency, purpose…) • Green space accessibility (distance, views) • Green space perceptions (amount, quality, safety…) • Other e.g. Life Event, Life Conditions • Demographics (age, work status etc.)
  24. 24. Green Space Quantity Data (GIS) GS Quantity  (% unit area) Ward Hutton  Land Use  ClassZone
  25. 25. Green Space Quantity: (1) Ward • UK CAS (Electoral  District) Unit • Parks, woodlands,  scrub + other natural  environments; NO private gardens • Area – Min = 57 ha – Max = 689 ha – Median = 126 ha (IQR =  316)
  26. 26. Green Space Quantity: (2) Zone • Scottish ‘Data Zone’ Unit • GS = as Ward (Parks,  woodlands, scrub +  other natural  environments) i. No private gardens ii. With gardens • Area – Min = 5 ha – Max = 445 ha – Median = 13 ha (IQR =  220) • Also 300m radius buffer  = 28 ha
  27. 27. Green Space Quantity: (3) Hutton Land Use Class (HLUC) • Scotland Green Space  Map Typologies  (‘PAN65’)  • Public open space,  gardens, roadside  trees and grass i. With woodlands ii. No woodlands • Areal units – Zone – 300m radius buffer
  28. 28. View to Green space from the home • Three point ordinal  scale: – No view – Partial view – Full view • Recorded for each  floor/level of the  home
  29. 29. Data Analysis • Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical,  blocked) – Each green space measure 
  30. 30. Data Analysis • Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical,  blocked) – Each green space measure  – Controlling for:  • Income (‘Income Coping’ – 4 point scale) • Deprivation (Carstairs Index) • Physical Activity ‐ with and without 
  31. 31. Data Analysis • Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical,  blocked) – Each green space measure  – Controlling for:  • Income (‘Income Coping’ – 4 point scale) • Deprivation (Carstairs Index) • Physical Activity ‐ with and without  • Sub‐groups: – Gender
  32. 32. Data Analysis • Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression (Heirarchical,  blocked) – Each green space measure  – Controlling for:  • Income (‘Income Coping’ – 4 point scale) • Deprivation (Carstairs Index) • Physical Activity ‐ with and without  • Sub‐groups: – Gender – ‘At home more’, identified according to Work Status: i. Looking after the home/family ii. Retired iii. Long term sick or disabled
  33. 33. Results
  34. 34. Perceived stress (PSS) at each site
  35. 35. Mental wellbeing (SWEMBS) at each site 
  36. 36. Sample Characteristics  • n = 305 (Pilton, Stobswell & Fintry; Craigmillar removed) • Age o 16 – 87 years o Mean = 43.7 years (SD = 17.1) • Gender: 136 male (44.6%), 169 female (55.4%) • Ethnicity: White ‐ 96.1% Scottish, 1.6% other UK, 2.3% non‐UK • Income Coping o Very difficult = 6.6% o Difficult = 27.5% o Coping = 48.9% o Comfortable = 13.8%
  37. 37. Green Space Quantity
  38. 38. Research Question 1 Is there a relationship  between the amount of  green space in the  residential environment and  perceived stress and mental  wellbeing? 
  39. 39. Perceived Stress (PSS): was green space quantity a  significant predictor? (i) Analysis by Gender 
  40. 40. Perceived Stress (PSS): was green space quantity a  significant predictor?  (ii) At Home More Sub‐group, by Gender
  41. 41. Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity:  At Home More sub‐group Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.567, p < 0.01)
  42. 42. Partial Regression Plots Residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs residuals  of the target explanatory variable on the remaining explanatory  variables 
  43. 43. Partial Regression Plots Residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs residuals  of the target explanatory variable on the remaining explanatory  variables  Moya‐Laraño & Corcobado (2008) ‘Plotting partial correlation and  regression in ecological studies’ [Web Ecology 8: 35–46] o A more appropriate method  for visualizing the true scatter of points  around the partial regression line than plotting the dependent  variable against the raw values of the independent variable
  44. 44. Partial Regression Plots Residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs residuals  of the target explanatory variable on the remaining explanatory  variables  Moya‐Laraño & Corcobado (2008) ‘Plotting partial correlation and  regression in ecological studies’ [Web Ecology 8: 35–46] o A more appropriate method  for visualizing the true scatter of points  around the partial regression line than plotting the dependent  variable against the raw values of the independent variable o “Partial regression plots should be the ones displayed in publications  because they accurately reflect the scatter of partial correlations” 
  45. 45. Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity:  ‘At Home More’ sub‐group Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.567, p < 0.01) Green space coverage:  26‐69 % Perceived stress: 2 – 18 Work status:  ‐ Retired 77% ‐ Disabled or long‐term sick 23%
  46. 46. Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity:  ‘At Home More’ sub‐group Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.567, p < 0.01)          Women: n = 43 (GS = n.s.) Green space coverage:  26‐69 % Perceived stress: 2 – 18 Work status:  ‐ Retired 77% ‐ Disabled or long‐term sick 23% Green space coverage:  24 ‐ 68 % Perceived stress: 0 – 27 Work status:  ‐ Looking after home/family 41% ‐ Retired 50% ‐ Disabled or long‐term sick 9%
  47. 47. Perceived Stress and Green Space Quantity:  Women At Home More Women: n = 43 (GS = n.s.)Differences between groups o Escape stress (p=0.000) o Life conditions (p=0.005) o Life event (p=0.016,  could be a positive or  negative event, but  more events for the high  stress‐high GS group) o Affect of life event  (p=0.062) o GS Freq Summer  (p=0.032) o Years in neighbourhood  (p=0.039)   
  48. 48. Mental Wellbeing (SWEMWBS): was green space  quantity a significant predictor?  (i) Analysis by Gender
  49. 49. Mental Wellbeing (SWEMWBS): was green space quantity  a significant predictor?  (ii) At Home More Sub‐group, by Gender
  50. 50. Mental Wellbeing (SWEMWBS) and Green Space  Quantity: At Home More sub‐group Men: n = 22 (Δr2 = 0.08, p < 0.01)           Women: n = 43 (GS = n.s.) Green space coverage:  22 ‐ 69 % Mental Wellbeing: 19 ‐35 Work status:  ‐ Retired 77% ‐ Disabled or long‐term sick 23% Green space coverage:  22 ‐ 69 % Mental Wellbeing: 17 – 35 Work status:  ‐ Looking after home/family 41% ‐ Retired 50% ‐ Disabled or long‐term sick 9%
  51. 51. Research Question 2 Is there a link between visual  access to green space from  home and perceived health  and wellbeing?
  52. 52. View to green space from the home • Perceived stress  – No significant association  (for any group)
  53. 53. View to green space from the home • Perceived stress  – No significant association  (for any group) • Mental wellbeing – Significant inverse association for women (r = ‐ .114 , p < 0.05), but not for  men – Not a significant predictor
  54. 54. View to green space from the home • Perceived stress  – No significant association  (for any group) • Mental wellbeing – Significant inverse association for women (r = ‐ .114 , p < 0.05), but not for  men – Not a significant predictor • BUT, most participants had  no view from their home…
  55. 55. View to green space  • Physical Activity – Significant positive  association for women at  home more group (r = .263 ,  p < 0.05)
  56. 56. View to green space • Physical Activity – Significant positive  association for women at  home more group (r = .263,  p < 0.05, n = 43) – Women who had a partial or  full view from their home  were on average 10 times  more active than those  women with no view from  their home – Men: no difference, but n is  small in comparison (n=22)
  57. 57. Summary • Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked  with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent mental wellbeing. • The strength and direction of relationships varied by gender  and likely amount of time spent at home – Men: lower perceived stress was associated with increasing  amounts of green space, particularly those likely to spend more  time at home – Women: the relationship between GS quantity and stress was  more complicated for women than for men, with only some  women showing the same patterns as men • Having a view from the home was not associated with better  perceived stress or mental wellbeing; however, most  participants had no view.
  58. 58. Summary • Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked  with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent mental wellbeing. • The strength and direction of relationships varied by gender  and likely amount of time spent at home – Men: lower perceived stress was associated with increasing  amounts of green space, particularly those likely to spend more  time at home – Women: the relationship between GS quantity and stress was  more complicated for women than for men, with only some  women showing the same patterns as men • Having a view from the home was not associated with better  perceived stress or mental wellbeing; however, most  participants had no view.
  59. 59. Summary • Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked  with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent mental wellbeing. • The strength and direction of relationships varied by gender  and likely amount of time spent at home – Men: lower perceived stress was associated with increasing  amounts of green space, particularly those likely to spend more  time at home – Women: the relationship between GS quantity and stress was  more complicated for women than for men, with only some  women showing the same patterns as men • Having a view from the home was not associated with better  perceived stress or mental wellbeing; however, most  participants had no view.
  60. 60. Summary • Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked  with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent mental wellbeing. • The strength and direction of relationships varied by gender  and likely amount of time spent at home – Men: lower perceived stress was associated with increasing  amounts of green space, particularly those likely to spend more  time at home – Women: the relationship between GS quantity and perceived  stress was more complicated for women than for men, with only  some women showing the same patterns as men • Having a view from the home was not associated with better  perceived stress or mental wellbeing; however, most  participants had no view.
  61. 61. Summary • Green space quantity in the residential environment was linked  with perceived stress, and to a lesser extent mental wellbeing. • The strength and direction of relationships varied by gender  and likely amount of time spent at home – Men: lower perceived stress was associated with increasing  amounts of green space, particularly those likely to spend more  time at home – Women: the relationship between GS quantity and perceived  stress was more complicated for women than for men, with only  some women showing the same patterns as men • Having a view from the home was not associated with better  perceived stress or mental wellbeing, but was associated with  higher levels of physical activity.
  62. 62. Conclusions Green space in the residential environment is a factor contributing  to the health and wellbeing of residents of deprived urban  communities in Scotland, particularly those who are likely to spend  more time in and around their neighbourhood.
  63. 63. Conclusions Increasing green space coverage in areas where there is little could  reduce stress levels and increase wellbeing for some; but, other  aspects of green space which impact on perceptions and use, such  as quality and safety, must also be considered. Image: Greenspace Scotland
  64. 64. lynette.robertson@ed.ac.uk c.ward‐thompson@ed.ac.uk

×