Museum communication
and social media:
The connected museum
Kirsten Drotner
drotner@dream.dk

:: Welfare and museums:
Chil...
Welfare, museums, children:
What are the connections?
•  Enlightenment + WWI = welfare concept
•  Focus on children as fut...
Areas of interest for
museum communication
Children as objects	


Protection	

discourse	


Empowerment	

discourse	


Chi...
What is the early tradition of
museum communication?
•  Sender perspective
•  Exhibition focus
•  Protection discourse

Na...
What is the recent tradition of
museum communication?
•  Receiver perspective
•  Technology focus
•  Individual empowermen...
A new communication paradigm:
The connected museum
•  Dialogical perspective
•  Communicative focus
•  Participation disco...
Social media can
catalyse participation
•  Blogs (short for weblogs) and microblogs (e.g. Twitter)
•  Media-sharing sites ...
Social media are not media
… but sub-genres of digital media with
particular characteristics of
communication
•  Sender is...
Social media and the
connected museum
•  What

interactive processes – not object
information
•  How
commercial service pr...
Institutional responses to
social media communication
•  Position of rejection: populism,
dumbing down
•  Position of cele...
DREAM’s approach
 
	
  

	
  
	
  

How can museums
advance participation?
	
  

Qualify existing knowledge base
C. Kobbernagel, K.C. Schrø...
What was the survey framework?
•  Why young people?
–  Below-average museum attendance
–  Above-average social media appro...
Typology of young
Danes’ museum uses
15%	
  

27%	
  

31%	
  
26%	
  

The	
  Tourist	
  
The	
  Diligent	
  
Type	
  	
 ...
Tourist (27%)

Diligent type
(26%)

Laggard (31%)

Enthusiast (15%)

< 2 visits per year

2 visits per year

< 1 visit per...
What are obstacles to participation
at the connected museum?
•  Class
•  Competence
•  Competition
What are options of participation
at the connected museum?
•  Class ->
•  Competence ->
•  Competition ->

•  Social engag...
Social engagement through
user-led scenarios
•  Relevance to my life
•  Professional presence
•  Social experience
Anne So...
Learning across contexts
•  Balance professional
insight and user
engagement
•  The importance of
gendered scaffolding
•  ...
Inclusion is situated and social
•  Social network formation
across online and offline
sites
•  Technology use should
be s...
What are the institutional options?
•  Coherent communication strategy
•  Visible leadership
•  Updated knowledge base thr...
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Kirsten Drotner - oplæg "Velfærd på Museum"

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Oplæg fra seminaret "Velfærd på Museum", afholdt på Nationalmuseet 12 - 13 september 2013. Oplæg fra Kirsten Drotner, www.dream.dk.

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Kirsten Drotner - oplæg "Velfærd på Museum"

  1. 1. Museum communication and social media: The connected museum Kirsten Drotner drotner@dream.dk :: Welfare and museums: Children, materiality and digital dialogue :: National Museum of Denmark :: 12 – 13 September 2013
  2. 2. Welfare, museums, children: What are the connections? •  Enlightenment + WWI = welfare concept •  Focus on children as future citizens –  protection tradition –  empowerment tradition •  Museums and children –  children as objects: institutions, exhibitions –  children as subjects: visitors
  3. 3. Areas of interest for museum communication Children as objects Protection discourse Empowerment discourse Children as subjects
  4. 4. What is the early tradition of museum communication? •  Sender perspective •  Exhibition focus •  Protection discourse Natural History Museum London 2010
  5. 5. What is the recent tradition of museum communication? •  Receiver perspective •  Technology focus •  Individual empowerment discourse ‘Museum Road’, London 2010
  6. 6. A new communication paradigm: The connected museum •  Dialogical perspective •  Communicative focus •  Participation discourse > digital technologies are catalysts, not causes, of change
  7. 7. Social media can catalyse participation •  Blogs (short for weblogs) and microblogs (e.g. Twitter) •  Media-sharing sites (e.g. Youtube) •  Virtual world sites (e.g. Second Life) •  Wikis (e.g. Wikipedia) •  Social bookmarking sites (e.g. Reddit) •  Social network sites (e.g. Facebook)
  8. 8. Social media are not media … but sub-genres of digital media with particular characteristics of communication •  Sender is de-institutionalised •  Text is de-stabilised •  Receivers are co-producers
  9. 9. Social media and the connected museum •  What interactive processes – not object information •  How commercial service providers •  Who users and co-creators - not merely visitors •  When continuous, here and now •  Where (some) people are •  Why questions museums’ received dicourses of identity
  10. 10. Institutional responses to social media communication •  Position of rejection: populism, dumbing down •  Position of celebration: widen reach, innovate image •  Position of reflection: knowledge-based incorporation
  11. 11. DREAM’s approach
  12. 12.         How can museums advance participation?   Qualify existing knowledge base C. Kobbernagel, K.C. Schrøder & K. Drotner. 2011. Unges medie- og museumsbrug: Sammenhænge og perspektiver [Young people’s media and museum uses: Connections and perspectives]. DREAM http://www.dream.dk/?q=da/formidling   12  
  13. 13. What was the survey framework? •  Why young people? –  Below-average museum attendance –  Above-average social media appropriation •  Why the museums/media nexus? –  Advance knowledge base for the connected museum –  Towards ’best practice’ of digital participation •  •  •  •  Data collection December 2010 Age group: 13-23 years Online survey 2.203 respondents – random, nationwide sample
  14. 14. Typology of young Danes’ museum uses 15%   27%   31%   26%   The  Tourist   The  Diligent   Type     The  Laggard   The  Enthusiast  
  15. 15. Tourist (27%) Diligent type (26%) Laggard (31%) Enthusiast (15%) < 2 visits per year 2 visits per year < 1 visit per year Many have 4 visits per year Family visit School visit and family visit School visit Family and friends visit Visit abroad - not art museum Differentiated interests: science, art Not interested, almost never art Differentiated interest, art Active on SNS via mobile Active with text processing Frequent gamer Infrequent reader Active news and book reader, net active Some use of text processing Less use of communication functions Less use of text processing Active on chat and SNS via PC, less via mobile Active with digital editing tools Read books more Less use of digital editing tools Less gameoriented, more info-oriented
  16. 16. What are obstacles to participation at the connected museum? •  Class •  Competence •  Competition
  17. 17. What are options of participation at the connected museum? •  Class -> •  Competence -> •  Competition -> •  Social engagement •  Learning across contexts •  Inclusion
  18. 18. Social engagement through user-led scenarios •  Relevance to my life •  Professional presence •  Social experience Anne Sophie Løssing, DREAM. National Gallery of Denmark, 2011
  19. 19. Learning across contexts •  Balance professional insight and user engagement •  The importance of gendered scaffolding •  Community continuity Celia Simonsen, DREAM. The Experimentarium, Denmark 2012
  20. 20. Inclusion is situated and social •  Social network formation across online and offline sites •  Technology use should be seamless and enhance experience Vitus Vestergaard, DREAM. Media Museum Denmark, 2011
  21. 21. What are the institutional options? •  Coherent communication strategy •  Visible leadership •  Updated knowledge base through partnerships •  United organization across curation, learning and communication

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