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Dear     Prime     Ministek            .                       I ,.       April,    1995                                  ...
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T&k Force                                 bn ForeiQm Poli                                                                 ...
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.P’urpose           ’                                                    innovaive ideas for advancing sustainable develop...
rpqse                                                  The Task Force also produced a book on sustainable                 ...
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Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng
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Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng

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Nrt annual-report-1994-1995-eng

  1. 1. Dear Prime Ministek . I ,. April, 1995 ‘. i This lett~ fo you, Prime Minister, brings to a close my service as Chair of the National Round, Table on the Environment and. ~the Economy (NRTEE). It’has been tremendously satisfying ’ for me to oversee {or four year3 the National Round Table’s development and ultimate transformation into a ‘departmental corporation. We are indebted to your government for proclaiming the Act to Establish the,National Round Table on.the Environment / .and the Ecopqmy (Bill C-72) last year. This legislation ,gives. the National Round Table new status as an independent agency; and the freedom and flexibility to speak and act independently. ~Importantly, it demonstrates the commitment of your government and,the Parliament of Canada to the long-term journey that __ _I- sustainable ,developmentrequires. -i When the NRTEE was created in 1968, sustainable development-was a new concept to most Canadians. However,,in recent years Canada has made significant progress toward,sustainable development: New language, concepts and processes are now in use; sustainable development ’ strategies are being created; neg orgamzations and institutions are blossoming Communities I ‘have ‘put in place greens and sustainable community activities; all provincesand territories _ ,- have created or are creating sustainable ,development .plans; many professional associations are undertaking sustainable development activities. Corporations such as Shell Canada, Northern Telecom and Transdta Utilities are taking the lead in adopting more sustainable >, ’ practices. Indeed, the language of sustainable development’has penetrated the highest levels of government. Your government-has ann,ounced the creation of a Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development and the requirement that all federal ‘departments , : create sustainable development stra:egies. These are all laudable achievements and signs of commitment and progress toward sustainability. , I We believe the National Round Table has playedtan integral role in bringing about this. , L transition. Cur mandate, as defined by our legislation, is to act: as a catalyst to promote the principles and practices of sustainable development in all sectors of Canadian society and in all regions .of Canada. ‘Over the past several years we have fulfilled that mandate . in a number of ways - through a&ice to you, Prime Minister, policy development with . ~ .I various government departments; sectoral dialogues and public awareness and education. ., i : Obviously sustainable development cannot be achieved by one organization alone. We rely greatly on .partnerships with businesses, non-government organizations, First Nations, I. , govemm,ents, academic institutions and others to carry out our work. Looking back, our . ’ Jefforts ,over the past few, years ‘fall under five main themes: changing attitudes and beliefs, I P , sustainable development in‘ a global >context, natural resource management, sustainable , “communities, and tools for sustainable development. ’ ’ .L ., ’;- , r ‘.
  2. 2. ’ / Changing. beople’s Attitudes, Beliefs and Behaviour ’f Sustainable development requires that we fundanientall>; change ours attitudes and behaviour in the wiytliat we view the world a;id our rklationship to it. The Natiorial Round Table has tried 1 * to l&p Canadians at ill levels to understand better the conn&tions between’the environment and the ecojnomy and the importance of sustainable,deveiopment. Through our education, corn- municat+ons:. &d publicatio,ns programs we help give Canadians the tools and infor&ation they I need to, take positive steps’ toward sus’taina&li$. ’ ‘- A Globa! Challenge Whstever we do in Canada, we must remember to look at our actions in a global Context. We ” must constantly striv& for global improveqe&s while tie York for’progress at home. This has been the focus of ‘our trade-&d foreign policy York, which $& promoted sustainable develop-8 ., ’ ;r, -ment within’the‘context of thk Earth Summit, the North America? Free Trade Agreement, ,’ GATT, the World Trade Organization, the Miami Summit of the Americas and; most recently, ,’ ’ the G7 Summit. This persp&+e is also reflected in the Natidnal Round Table3 growing inter- national relations with other countries. We have received d&ens ofintemational delegations inter$sted in understanding the round+able proces‘s and how w& are wprkingtow?rd sustainable developtient in Canada. Round tables or similar orga nizations now exist in many ,: _ countries, including South Affica, the Philippines, the Utiit&d Sti &es and Great‘Bri&n. .-L , , _, Ii .> Canada’s Natural Resources ~ ‘d Canada ip one of the most ri@y endowed cog mtries in the world. Our ‘qconomy dep.epds on L+ harvesting our natural resources, but they must be ha rvested $ustainably.‘fhe sustainable, _, ’ ,.’ ’ ’ I management df natural resources js a conteniious artd Izprnplex issue th&a&cts niany,$iffere& ‘. ’ 1 ._ . .stakeholders in each of our natural r&source sectors. T he ,Nation~Ro~nd~Tab~e:has f@skd ‘* I. ’ , on,for&ry, fisheries and agriculture. we !&&only jus . our For&n/&d Pulp and Panei R6und’?al&s. Rtu-al i 1 I ._ on East Coast Communities and Marine Ecq$qtems. However, ,w&have learneN stakeholders often share similar values and.can Iearn‘to work tog&her g&en ‘tht ‘.,i. A Commuhitv kf.Commupiti& ,. ‘:, ’ Each sustainable development i&u& is~pla);ec~. out & VE and national. Different solutions are a$rQpriate ataeach l&el. W&at we have learnkd is that ’ the only way to do justice to these ~,~,K$&& iSg$es iS to make sure tha!,$l the sf$ebo$+,rs -$e f .) ._r YJ i ‘. involved. While governmen& atid l‘&@&&e~b6dies pla~~sse’ntial r&s, ‘I%$ ‘&g oft& cOn-‘“! ;/ sti-ained by jurisdictional boundaries, hierarchical structures and cumbkrs.ome ‘procedures. We i . need alternative, flexible and effective ways of bringing together those groups an’d individuals, who have the experience, insight and commitment to,illumitiate all sides of sustainable develop- I I’ ment issues and to help to choose the p$hw’ays to j&t, rkasonable and sustainable practices. : ’ This is where,round, tables have played a significant rdle. Over 200 round tables’ have emerged . at the local leve’l in recent years to fill this gap in participatoj democracy. Cotimunities have ’ . become the frontiers of change in Canada an< the multitude of activity is extremely encouraging. . ” ~. / ‘, .pa9e 3’
  3. 3. I’ ‘. . / T~~ols for: Sustainable -Development- , ‘ ~ There is no question that sustainable development ,requires new models of decision makmg, new systems of measurement and assessment; and appropriate incentives &rd disincentives that integrate economic,,environment~, and social’objectives. The National Round Table has ’ > worked toward developing several-important sustainable development tools. dur National . Task-Force on Consensus Decision Making, .working with pro&& round tables, has .pub-I / ’ lished a set of guiding principles for consensus decision making. Over 20,000 copies have bee-n ‘distributed around the ,world, and the booklet has been translated mto at least four languages. Our Task Foree on Sustainable Development Reporting has developed a frame- , work for a system of information gathering and reporting on progress toward sustainable I development that integrates ecological health, economic ind@ators and human well-being. . , The Economic Instruments Collaborative has made concrete ,recomggenda’tions on how .e economic instruments could be used to address acid r-a&ground-level ozone and greenhouse’ 3 gas, problems in Canada. , Difflcblt Choices Lie Aheat ’ /’ .._ As proud as we are of Canada’s progress toward sustainable~development in manydifferent areas, nevertheless it is mucb,too early to be complacent, Prime Minister. Despite .these, t, promising~signs, in, terms of reakchange our progress has been modest. We have done the easy part in laying the-foundations for a sustainable ,future, but the most difficult- choices lie ahead. Our current path is still~~unsustainable. We still need major changes h our decision 8, making structures, institutions, public policy; economi6 incentives and indicators, behaviour / , ‘and values if we are to bring human activity within nature’s limits. ’ I ~’ ‘. ‘The&changes are within our grasp. Jt is within our means to make the transition to a sus- tamable society; aud the National Round Table has a vitalrole to play in this transition in . years to come. It has been a great honoui- to‘be part of this unique Canadian organization ’ over the past four years, and a tremendous learning,experienc.e. I hope that in the future the National Round Table will continue to bmld on what we have started,:working closely I , with your government to build a sustxnnable future for all Canadians. I Dr. George F. Connell . Chair . .wLae 4 .
  4. 4. ,- / o-m the Execu,tive Director d * 1: Dear Pk’me Minister: , -April 1995 As Executive’Director and ChiefTExecutive Officer, ‘I am pleased to ‘submit our Annual Review-for 1994-1995. The National &ound Table is the only legislated body inCanada specifi&lly mandated to be a catalyst on sustainabilityissues. It is uniquely positioned to bring together a broad range of’competing .interests to work together toward a solution beneficial to all. 1 6’ ,In the .past year, we have convened workshops’, round tables, task forces and other fora to bring Canadianstogether to grapple with I some of the most critical public policy issues of.our time, We have published books, workingipapers, our very popular qu&terly news. letter, policy reports and other materials,. All of these are geared ’ toward promoting understanding and increasing. public awareness of ’ the cultural, social, economic and policy changes required to attain sustainable development. We have also provided specific advice, to you, Prime Minister, on several topics, to encourage integrating’ x_ environmental and economic considerations into government decision-making processes./ Although Canada has made some,,progresstoward ‘sustainable development, we continue to run real economic, ecological and social deficits. We continue to,mask the reality of the present by borrowing against our future. The crises we face today are thelegacies of inadequate decision making of the past. We cannot continue to meet our needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs until we move to more integrated forms of decision;* making. Eve*rywherepeople are demanding ‘more meaningful input into decisions that directly affect them or the place ,where they live. I,n, making these decisions we 6~11 have to find ways / to accommodate deeply held and differing values. Nowhere is this more evident than in coping with the complexities that issues of sustainability present. _’ ‘_, As there is no roadmap to navigate the path to sustainability, ‘we do our work in a spirit of learning. Learning has been descrjbed~as “the accommodation of new ideas with old structures.” This ’ ’ accommodation with the imperative of sustainability will involve fundamental changes in ways- that we are only beginning to understand. Our task in the future will be‘to further this understanding. _ . i _ ‘, As my four year term expires with the submission of this Annual Review, please allow me to recognize the butstanding.dedication of the staff and,niembers of the NRTEE and to thank you, Prime Minister, for your support during the past year. It has been an honour to serve. * ’ “ , .L5 : .‘r RonaldL. Doering ,’ ” . .. ;. ’ Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer ’ -. , , ’ .- .’ . I ’ i I page 5
  5. 5. . R&md ? au1 ~iti&ivk ‘$p ;+ :&F The National Round‘Table receives its mandate from the Parliament of Canada,and reports directly I .‘,.,SWeg?+*; %>~, _ ,:$ a to the Prime Minister. Its 25 members are’appointed by the federal government to represent a broad . ’ -&* __‘-‘a* pr&w range of regions and interests across Canada. Members meet as a group four times a year to determine priorities for action, review current .work, initiate newgrograms, and promote a better understanding _ , of the concept-of sustainable development.. r .’ .- During the past year the National Round Table’has achieved its mandate through work in. 13 ‘different L program areas or-task forces. The results of these efforts have taken several different forms: . .* providing advice to the Prime Minister on key sustainable development policy issues; ,/ “. l developing tools t,o advance sustainable development in government policy and other sectors; ; ’ ‘6 act&as a neutral meeting ground and facilitating a process where different stakeholder groups i can work together to reach consensus on important sustainability issues; . , * on-going communications and education programs’that develop information and educational tools to facilitate grass-roots initiatives and to help decision makers address issues of sustainability. - I j , ‘, After proclamation of the National Round’Table Act last May, the Prime Minister appointed 10 new members and the NRTEE,launched several new initiatives, including task forces on environmental ‘_ , industries and federal government green procurement, a partnership for sustainable coastal communities and marine ecosystems, and a transportation and climate change collaborative. These new undertakings . complement ongoing programs in foreign policy, education, reporting, consensus decision making, rural renewal, and pulp’and paper. A sumrmary of the achievements in each of these areas is found on the ” I pages that follow. ’ ‘_ Other noteworthy events and accomplishments ,of the National Round Table in 1994-95 include: 1’ . _ : l In April 1994, the NRTEE published the final report of its Forestry Round Table on Sustainable Development, a landmark achievement. Over 25 stakeholders,: representing a diverse range of _. views incanada’s forestry debate, agreed unanimously to 26 principles for the sustainable manage ,.- 1 ment of Canada’s forests, backed by action plans. ._ . .. l In addition to advice to the Prime. Minister on implementing sustainable development within the . context of GATT and the World Trade Organization, the Miami Summit of the Americas, and the G7 Summit, the NRTEE also submitted advice on measures regarding the tax treatment of i -- ecologically sensitive lands: SeveralNRTEE l members played key roles in the federal Minister of Finance’s Task Force on Barriers and Disincentives to Sound~Env&mmental Practices, which made recommendations !’ to governm.ent.on ways to improve government subsidies and incentives to reflect sustainable development principles. Y 4 I 0’ The NRTEE advised several international governments on the round table process, including _’ Britain (which has established the UK Round Table on Sustainable Development), Vietnam, I PakistanChina, and Norway’s Prime Minister Gro Harlem Bnmdtland. , ‘.
  6. 6. T&k Force bn ForeiQm Poli and Sustainability , Purpose Sustainable develooment. 7 along- with market intema- L 0 o--~ The$npose of the Task Force on Foreign Policy, tion and democratization, was a core agenda theme and Sustainability is to promote sustainable devel- , ‘at the Miami Summit..To prepare its advice, the Task opment in Canadian foreign: policy, to influence Force co-sponsored three multistakeholder work- policy development within the federal government,‘ ‘shops in Ottawa,’ Washington and Mexico City during and to advise the Prime Minister on opportunities _ the summer ‘and fall of 1994 in order to meet vth * and ways to,promotk sustainable’development government officials, discuss sustainability issues in * through Canada’s external relatiqns. the hemisphere, and hear the views of Caribbean, Central and South American groups. In November,& ‘mm* ‘,:.;‘I Achievements in 199?,-95 submitted its recommendations to the Prime Minister L During the past year the Task Force identified four on issu&such & trade, biodiversity and conservation, major opportunities for advancing sustainable, energy and climate change, and in‘digenous peoples. ’ development in Canadian foreign policy: the GA’IT Although not all of the Task Force’s recommenda- and World ,Trade Organization (WTO); Canada’s tions were adopted, they did alert the Canadian foreign policy review; the Miami Summit of the government to the, sustainable development issues Americas; and the G7 Summit. at stake in Miami, some of which were reflected ’ _. f’ ;,;.,:. ‘I‘ L ’ in the SummXsfinal co _.,/ ,“‘. _. L GATT and WTO ’ ... .‘. .. _I: In March 1994, the Task Force hosted a highly -1 G7 successful workshop in Montreal to examine .‘,: .’ In h+$$?mberj i’,‘ the. sustainable development implications of the : to !$$peom! Uruguay Round of the GATT, and ,the prospective : =L.~~o~t’~~pre~ %‘TO. The workshop brought together stakeholders from relevant constituencies to ident+ areas of ’ consensus and possible points of emphasis for : the Canadian government at the GATT meetings “ : scheduled for April. Following the ~orkshop,,,t.he~ Task Force drafted a letter of advice to t&‘Minister of International Trade suggesting ways in. tihich ‘a mt Canada could promote the integration of‘trade i$e National RoundTab ‘, Min. .’ h::Tk w,orkshop’ proceedings and environment in the new WTO. ’ ” i ’ -+,.r ^ .‘-. .i 1have ‘Foreign Policy Review ’ ’ : :;:k The Task Force also promoted sustainable develop- ,’ ment as part of the federal government’s revie+ of Canada’s foreign policy. it studied h$wtheprinci- Future:~di,~e’~iion-, ~ ’ ples of sustainable development could serve as The Task’Force will’continue topromote its ‘an integrating theme for Canada’s foreign policy -G7 Summit recommendations among decision j. in the coming years and made a submission to the 1 makers pending a review of its future-role’by Special Joint Com&ittee on Foreign Policy the m:embers of the NRTEE. during its hearings in the summer of 1994. The . Committees? subsequent report contained.a chapter Task Force Members ’ on sustainable d&elopment and generously ’ I Chair: Pierre Marc Johnson, NRTEE Member . Susan H&z, h’RTEE Member endorsed some key passages from the NRTEE’s ’ . Harvey Mead, NRTEE &@nber submission. The federal government’s new foreign Bbb Page; NRTkE &mber . policy statement, released in February 1995, included Maurice Strong, NRTEE Mdmber sustainable development as one of its underlying ]ohn Kirton, University of Toronto , themes. ‘.I Resource,Pebple ~ Miami Summit &if the A’mericas Styhanie Foster, Ontario Hydr During the past year the Task Force submitted Brigitte Gagne: Salmon An, B.C. advice to the Prime Minister regarding two major lie1 Wilson, Coop,e-rs and Lybrand international meetings: the Summit of the’ Americas ’ ,’I ” held.in Miami in December 1994, and the G7 NRTEE Secretariat Sarah Rich&son Summit. scheduled for Halifax later this vear.
  7. 7. r Round se, ., . Pulp and Paper Round Table’Members D&a &won, Canadian Pulp and Paper Association in 1993 the National Round Table brought Harry Bombay, National Aboeginal For@y Assoqiation , up of 25 national stakeholder groups. - -~npe Camozzi, Canadian N&&-k for E.nvironmmtal h the Canadian pulpband paper, Education and C&mu,nica&m sector to discuss issties associated with the sus- Hugh Cook, Envi&m‘ent Canada 5 Claire Densereau, Richmond, B.C. _ tainable production ofpulp’and paper, Despite Rocco Delvecchio, Industry Canada ., ~widely differing perspectives and values; partici- Andrd Duchesne, Ass&i&ion des industries /’ pantslagreed to work together to reach consensus foreSti&es du Q&bec Fran@s Guimont, Environment Canada on a set of principles -to guide the sustainable / Mayor David Ha&ton, City of Thunder Bay, . - production, consumption, disposal or re-use of Federation of Canadian Municipalities t’ pulp and,paper, as well as to develop specific john Hanson, Recycling Co.uncil of Ontario , action plans based on these principles. 1 Ann Hillyer, We& Coast Envimnmen+zl Law A&%ation : t John Houghton, QUNO Corp. ; Doug Hyde, qhelsea, Qudbbec Keith Jackson, Canadian Printing Industries Associatiok.’ ,$ Abhievemdnts i,n 1994-95 David J&&on, Stora Forest In&tries Members of the Pulp and Paper Round Table Christine Lucy!, Canadian Daily Newspapers Association / ” have met several times over the past two years, Susan Masswohl, Cqnadian Wildlife Federatiori , j. ’ ’ working toward consensus aria set of principles. Elizabeth May, Sierra Club of Canqda, NRTEE &ember P&l Muldoon, Canadian Enoironmbatal Law Association “: The NRTEE acted as catalyst and facilitator for John Mullinder, Paper and Paperboard Packaging‘ the discussions,.under the leadership of John 1. Environ&&l Council I ‘. Houghton, Chairman of QUNO Corp.,former ‘At& Nanda, Asso&tion of Mzmicipi Recycling Coordinators i Prem Nande, Consumers Association of Canada member of the NRTEE and chair of its Forestry Keith.Newman, Communications, Energy and 1 Round,Table. Last summer, ,at a Quebec City Paperworkers Union pi Canada, meeting, Pulp and Paper Round Table partici- Gordon Perks, Better Transportation Coalition pants reviewed and formahzed a draft set of - David Schindler, University of Albitia P&r ?ofi, Health C&da ’ , principles on the sustainable production of pulp Wayne B. Wolfe, Irtjing Fomst Services and paper in Canada. While some indicated Peter Wrist, Pulp and Paper Research Institute that their final agreement to the draft principles j 1 of Canada a_ was.already,as&red, others requested time to consult with and seek’approval frbm’their vari- NRTEE Skcretariat ‘. ous constituents. After many meetings and much Steve Thompson : Allison Webb (zlntil October, 1994) ’ hard work, the Round Table held its eighth’and Sarah Shadfoith final meeting in Ottawa in January 1995. At that time, ‘all representatives at the table unanimously 1 appr0ved.a set of 18 principbs covering such issues as anthropogenic-organic chemicals, closed- loop. technologies, and codes of practice. This -agreement was published by the National Round Table in May 1995, as NRTEE Working Paper 29. ’ Future Direction+ i , Many .of the participants are now developing action plans that support the principles. They ‘will be published as, part of the National - ,Round Table’s .final report in the fall of 1995. . ,’ i . . , .’ ’ 1 I ’ L : ’ _’ .I ., ’ I i : / - I _ page< 8
  8. 8. .P’urpose ’ innovaive ideas for advancing sustainable develop- ’ The goals of the Education Task’Force are to il ment at post-secondary institutions were identified’ fa+litate.an understanding of sustainable.devel- and a background report will be prepared for pub- ’ opment and consensus decision making among lit distribution. The Task Force also commissioned . , key sectors of Canadiansociety Its addresses ’ , a badkground paper on community-based social both formal and informal education through its marketing, an approach to changing individual work with youth, educators, academic institutions, ‘attitudes and values that can lead to behaviour, ,T media and other s&to&x *, change. Carried’out at the local level, it has become / ! , an effective tool for introducing sustainable deve- I . ,Abhievegnents in, 199,4-95 ’ ’ _ lopment programs. In addition, the Task,Force In the past year, the Education Task Force’under- co-sponsored, along with the Association of took a wide array of initiatives~involving the media, Municipal Recycling Coordinators (AMRC) and , . % / academic institutions, municipal decision makers, the ,Ontario Ministry of Environment and Energy, ”, 6’ a pilot.%orkshop held in Toronto in >March 1995: and youth. As ‘an overarching theme for its work, ..1 1 _1. I The event intro&&d commumiy-based socia? . it supported the development and feasibility study,c marketing to more than 75 municipal decision ‘of a national sustainable development social makers from’acsosS Ontario. Feedback fr‘om par- . marketing strategy called SustainABILITY, in ’ ticipants was: very positive. -tasb ‘- orce members. .-. .’ r , partnership. with ParticipACTION. __. P.1 -. also met ,with representatrves 01 Me &nvironmental,, The Task Force tiontinued to conduct its ever- Centre for New/Canadians to explore some of the popular you round tables which, during the past barriers to the involvement of new Canadians in 4: year, involved more than than 1,506 students from environmental issues. across Canada. The Task Force joined tith Learning i ’ for a Sustainable Future, ERE Education, and y’ Futyre D’ lyeczlons mm ’ 5 Health Canada to develop a Canadian Y&th Action .,The Education Task F ‘orce plans to: co-sponsor Guide for A&&z 21. The guide was developed L additional workshops (In community-based social ‘: ‘/ %.. and ;Nlitten by youth through a series of dross- ’ I marketing in other parts of the’count_ry. An evalua- -Canada focus groups with high school students:., tion of the‘youth n&de1 round table process will The guide allotis young people,pare,n~and .. ,T l“.. -1. .I .- oe concrrcreoQm oraer‘to a?sess its impact arXdto : ‘I’ 3“ ’ .’ ; : “‘: educators to voice their views on @n&&&r~d,~, .; ,g ; offers ways to take s;ock of the sit&ion; to Iook‘ *‘, _a,~ )helpdevelo&&zining ‘-..~f,vi &&kage for teachers and : ‘, .J z “.+>_., ;&l&atbrs.~ The .Task Fo$e &ill’ &XI explore the 1, I., for solutions, and to take community action: J .: ,)., . . ’ ,~zx possibility‘of conduct&workshops oc er iviron- -r‘. .s , (.’ .. The’ National Round Table held p,a ~%&:iis &oun -, mental management,for .:I small business in Icoopera- a ,.. with media re&esentatives in Toront&&%eb& _ Id &g ?- “I‘, ‘. .. ,i , %.,, , uyl <::-i ltion w&the Retail CounUof~Canada an 1995. Its &roose was to increase the“3&*Es ~_~ ._ ‘-“~~~~~~~:i:eder~ti~~~dfIndep~~~entiB:siriess. _ , ’ ,“;’ : ” * underst&lin’g of ho,vand what the me&@ &nt _ ’ ’ I >s;,,,? or need to.learn abo’ut sustainable-development, ,. ..p _ Tasl to promote the role of the NRTEE in &omm*&. ‘ _ , -i ..plin In March 1995, the Task Force hosted-a %or@op “- &s .to discuss interdisciplinary research ‘&d education. on sustainability at the post-second& level. It$as attended bi 22 university presidents and vi&e& 1’. t_ ‘. , L<,, .- page 9 , : : t /: ‘. . ‘.
  9. 9. rpqse The Task Force also produced a book on sustainable ’ The mandate-of the NRTEEs Task Force on development reporting. Pathways to Sustainability: ‘_ - Sustainable Development Reporting is to address Assessing ouy Progress’combines the substance~.Y ,,, Canada’s ne,ed for a systkrn of measuring and- of the Task Force’s 1993 colloquium on sustain- 1 -reporting-the country’s progress toward achieving ability reporting, a reprint ofthe report to the e ,. sustainable development. .I Prime Minister.as well as a/ground-breaking case. -. I L / study on assessing progress toward sustainability ~ : in the Great Lakes Basin. The book,&ill be _ ,- Achievdments’ in. 1;94-95 .:-- ‘released in Mayf1995. ; .Following the December 1993 release of its / ‘5 ,’ aeport to the-Prime Minister, Toward l&porting Task Force members met with Natural Resources Progress on Su.st&able De~e@pent’ in Capada, Canada staff to.discuss ways to Collaborate on the ’ : # the Task Force contacted various federal govern- -assessment of energy productioa and use in Canada. . The Task Force also began work with the Canadian ~ ’ m’ent’departments to press for implementation ’ of its recommendations. One of thereport’skey ‘Coalition of Education Organizations to develop “’ ;- recommendations was to establish an office. of ’ a framework to allow .educational institutions to, . , assess %heir progress toward sustainability. Links’ . a commissioner for sustainable development, .- wh&the federal government announced in were also established with the-newly cr&ited . (,October”1994. t j , ’ Presidents Council on Sustainable DevelopmentI,..’ ‘. in the United States,‘and the U.S. government’s ’ The Task Force &o. continued to provide a forum.,:, , ’ Interagency Working Group on Sustainable for discussing critical issues in sustainability : > Development .Indicators. repornng. rn mar-an 1995, it joined with the’ _ / . Westminster Institute for Ethics and Human ’ ( values to host a dolloquium onassessing human ,Future Di*rections ^ < , ’’ well-being inrithin the context of sustainable ‘Pending a review of its mandate, the Task Force .a j development. The colloquium, which took place will continue to press .for implementation of its i in London, Ontario, brought together learned recommendations to the-federal government ‘on ., ’ academics from various fields (including medicine, reporting on sustainable development and to L philosophy, psychology, economics and ecology) support and work with othersagencies toimprove to meet with representatives of key federal ,. sustainability monitoring and reporting. ” .’ ’ : government agencies involved in sustainability ., reporting including theAAuditor General, Task, Force MembersI ^ li’mivnmmamt f’nnorlo 2nd Statistics Canada. i Chair: Tony Hedge, NRTEE Member , _ 1 i Susan H&z, NRTEE Member : Elizabeth Cracker, NRTEE Mevber i . Marty Eakins, NRTEE Member‘ Pie& Goss&n, Ste-Fey, QuJbec ’ I Resource Pqple. Frangois Bregha, Resources Future International Paul~V&est, University of Victoria , P‘ ( ,*x ~ ,’ / NRTEE’ Secretariat - - 1 lane inch
  10. 10. I _ . .. , : - P,urpose’ ’ j ” .. The purpose of this Task Eorce’ is to promote the ’ ‘,. / e ” I understanding and use of consensus decision making principles and methods as a means of achieving : .’ I ,’ ; .’ . I . sustainable development.~It was established by ” * ‘. / t . the NRTER in 1998. .,’ i < ,Achieviments ih 1994:65 _ , , _, Eollo@ng the success of its-1993 ‘publication ,~ _1.(... .,.. .: .._.__ . .: _ ,J ~. i __ : T,i f W’,.%.. %Z, i editing stages, will highlight experierices from : ‘ _; < .,‘,‘;, :,.,;. s‘;t. across Canada and describe hotiSl&&inciples of consensus decision making c*$&&&ctically ,applied in many different conflic~‘s~$ions. , Currently no otherbook introduces~theconcepts of consensus decision making in a sim@$j @a&al manner that is accessible to a wi,deaudie’ncnce,,, i ” WV “W”, “WL I _ _‘__.. , ., ’ ‘, -. ,. Future Directions ‘_, ‘. “,‘. ._ The future activities of the Task Force‘& be. established following a review of its mandate by the members ofthe,NRTEE. ’ ’ ’ that reconcile I ,‘ ’ ,,” ,, ‘. ,, Task,Force Members , >i s .Co-Chair: i?&q Stuart;NRTEE Member - : 1/’ . Co-Chair: Reg Basken, NtiTEE Member .r -1 Jerry D’Arcy Cormick, Dela+ere, &fill Creek, Royal Bank Washington, bf Canada U.S.A. ~ forge new cooperyative... Patit Emend, Tom+, Ontario -? ]ane Hawkrigg, Oakoille, Ontario ’ ” ’ ’ ” .. . -ekplore innovativk ,I _ I - NRTEE Secret&at 1 Allpn Webb ‘juntil October 1994) solutions.” _’ . I/ ~. ‘. , i’ Building Consensus for a Sustainable Future: hiding Principles ,I ’ 8’ I page ,11 , 7 _,

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