Risk II & Disguised Compliance
Nathan Loynes
Read ‘The bad old days’ – What do you
think?
Tim Gill – Who is to blame? (p.61)

1. Discuss in small groups why
‘blame’ seems to be a prominent
aspect of contemporary ...
In ‘Loco Parentis’ (Tim Gill, p.63)
• What does this term mean?
• Which ‘yardstick’ do the courts use in
determining this?...
Was this a risk too far? (What if you
worked for the nursery in question?)
Every Child Matters or Every £
matters?

“For both pre-school and school-age
children, the last decade has seen a
dramatic...
Read Gill, p. 69, from ‘If care
workers…’
Consider the following points and feedback:
1. Overriding priority to return chi...
The media is ‘to blame’ (sic)

Senior BBC journalist, Andrew
Marr: “to sell papers, news
must move and that often
means pr...
Gill: ‘Beyond Risk Aversion’
• The situation is complex.
• Proposals for the future are equally
challenging.

“Resilience ...
Disguised compliance: ‘Clouding’ risk
assessment?
• Parent/Carer distracts professionals away
from harm.
• Involves ‘appar...
Cases in the news:
A: Peter Connolly’s mother to be released
B: Hamzah Khan
C: Daniel Pelka
• How do you think ‘blame’ fea...
Conclusion
• There are pressures on services (i.e. nurseries and
childcare) to be risk averse.
• Gill argues that this is ...
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Risk ii & disguised compliance

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Risk ii & disguised compliance

  1. 1. Risk II & Disguised Compliance Nathan Loynes
  2. 2. Read ‘The bad old days’ – What do you think?
  3. 3. Tim Gill – Who is to blame? (p.61) 1. Discuss in small groups why ‘blame’ seems to be a prominent aspect of contemporary culture. 2. How do you feel about blame? (as ‘the blamed’ and/or ‘the blamer’)
  4. 4. In ‘Loco Parentis’ (Tim Gill, p.63) • What does this term mean? • Which ‘yardstick’ do the courts use in determining this? • Do you think ‘uncertainty’ (risk) applies to the concept of ‘loco parentis’?
  5. 5. Was this a risk too far? (What if you worked for the nursery in question?)
  6. 6. Every Child Matters or Every £ matters? “For both pre-school and school-age children, the last decade has seen a dramatic expansion in the time spent in formal childcare. The main reasons for this expansion have been economic, not educational”. (Gill, 2007:68).
  7. 7. Read Gill, p. 69, from ‘If care workers…’ Consider the following points and feedback: 1. Overriding priority to return children unscathed? 2. Little incentive to allow children to experiment? 3. Hurt/distress means (staff) taking a risk themselves. 4. Low status? 5. No time for reflection & planning? 6. High turnover – cannot develop sustained relationships.
  8. 8. The media is ‘to blame’ (sic) Senior BBC journalist, Andrew Marr: “to sell papers, news must move and that often means provoking fear” (cited in Gill, 2007:73).
  9. 9. Gill: ‘Beyond Risk Aversion’ • The situation is complex. • Proposals for the future are equally challenging. “Resilience means finding ways to function in a world when bad things happen. So what distinguishes it from fatalism, indifference or negligence” (pages 83/4).
  10. 10. Disguised compliance: ‘Clouding’ risk assessment? • Parent/Carer distracts professionals away from harm. • Involves ‘apparent’ parental cooperation. • Can be identified by family’s failure to ‘change’ • Professionals need to challenge there own held assumptions, play ‘devil’s advocate’ (i.e. frequently internally ask ‘what if…?’) • Why is playing ‘devil’s advocate’ difficult?
  11. 11. Cases in the news: A: Peter Connolly’s mother to be released B: Hamzah Khan C: Daniel Pelka • How do you think ‘blame’ feature in these cases? • Do you consider that ‘disguised compliance’ was an issue in these cases?
  12. 12. Conclusion • There are pressures on services (i.e. nurseries and childcare) to be risk averse. • Gill argues that this is for economic rather than educational/developmental reasons. • Disguised compliance involves practitioners being ‘taken in’ by parents. • Disguised Compliance (DC) can exist at the preventative end of the child protection process, and unfortunately often identified ‘after’ a tragic event. • We can mediate against DC by being reflective, asking questions, and building strong relationships with the children (‘seeing’ the child).

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