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Nathalie Jolivert Portfolio 2016

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Nathalie Jolivert Portfolio 2016

  1. 1. NATHALIE JOLIVERT PORTFOLIO
  2. 2. NATHALIE JOLIVERT PORTFOLIO TABLE OF CONTENTS ARCHITECTURE 1- Pixelating Bamboo- Architectural Association Visiting School.......................... 2- Viviane Gauthier’s Studio......................................................................................... 3- Saint Margaret Convent in Haïti- Studio Drum Collaborative............................ 4- Ecole Elie Dubois- Architecture for Humanity ...................................................... 5- Building Local in Colombia- Bamboo design-build workshop........................ 6- Davis Park Pavilion- RISD project............................................................................ 7- Bamboo Eco-Touristic Center in la Guajira, Colombia- RISD project .............. MIXED-MEDIA 1- Curiosités Urbaines, Solo Exhibition in Haiti.......................................................... 2- Carnet de Voyages.................................................................................................... 3- Brand Design Projects............................................................................................... 4- Roof-Top Flyers in New York City............................................................................ 5- Swiss Embassy Mural in Haiti.................................................................................... 6- Roots of Development Tapestry for the USAID.................................................... page 3 page 10 page 24 page 30 page 35 page 38 page 41 page 46 page48 page 49 page 50 page 51 page 53
  3. 3. Pixelating Bamboo Location: Kenscoff, Haïti Type: Experimental . Pavilion Design Year: 2014 Inspired by late Victor A. Wynne’s adobe block compressor which has remained intact on the site we were given, me and my team-mate, Jean-Eddy Samedi, stu- dent at Universite de Quisqueya, explored ways to work with earth-blocks and bamboo blocks to design a simple pavilion. About the AA Haiti Visiting School: An intensive workshop in experimental architectural design contextualized for the climate, culture and materiality of Haiti. Through speculative proposals which inte- grate bamboo, the aim is to create a vision for a lightweight contemporary Haitian built environment.
  4. 4. SECTION Student Presentations during the workshop
  5. 5. PLAN VIEW
  6. 6. CONTEXT INTERIOR VIEW
  7. 7. Location: Port-au-Prince, Haïti Type: Residential Year: 2015 Viviane Gauthier is an elderly dancer who lives and conduct dance classes in one of the most renown Gingerbread Houses in Port-au-Prince. This house is subject to a restoration by the British firm Mac Aslan. My colleagues and I, at the Architectural Association Visiting School in Haiti were tasked by Mac Aslan Architects to provide Viviane Gauthier with a temporary shelter in the back-yard of her residence, in which she could reside during the restoration work. This proposal is designed with bamboo as primary structural material. Viviane Gauthier’s Studio The Interior
  8. 8. The facade of Madame Gauthier’s Gingerbread House (Photo Jenna M. McKnight) Students on the last AA Haiti Visiting School Course, in Croix des Bouquets, Haiti (Photo Bahare Khodabande) de unity o l 25. The n, not ect dication ls from aching aterial he nsively on for a e architect ndustry t such as agate its Viviane Gauthier’s Gingerbread House Why Bamboo: Viviane Gauthier’s Gingerbread House is one of the most renown houses of this typology, still standing in Port-au-Prince after the devetating earthquake of January 10, 2010. It is a cultural landmark which structural integrity has been well-studied by preservationists who are now working towards the restoration of the house. Haiti suffers from a high rate of deforastation. The cultivation and use of bamboo, a fast growing crop with tremendous structural properties that compete with steel, could be highly benefitial to the nation in its efforts of reforestation. Currently, there is a large bamboo plantation located in Marmelade- in the Northern Department of Haiti- which this brief proposes to use as resource for the construction of Madame Gauthier’s temporary studio. Proposal for Mdme Viviane Gauthier’s Gingerbread House PAGE 4 Why bamboo for Haiti? Imported Colombian bamboo is already being used on projects in Port au Prince. This house in the suburb of Croix des Bouquets was built by local bamboo architect Gary Pierre Charles. Bamboo is already growing in large quantities in Marmelade, in the North of Haiti. The issue of deforestation has, in recent years, been tackled with investment in bamboo. The story of bamboo in Haiti started in the 1950s when Victor Wynne began a process of conserving an area of forested land in the midst of widespread deforestation. He looked at ways of improving and repairing the Bamboo is a truly remarkable plant and Haiti’s mountainous territory makes it an ideal location for rapid growth and industrial development. SPEED OF GROWTH Considered as a grass, bamboo can grow up to one meter per day. The construction grade bamboo Guadua This can be a quick source of material for charcoal production to relieve the burden from the slow growing trees currently deforested at an unsustainable rate for that very fuel source. After this initial growth spurt over the next 4-5 years guadua can grow up to 30 metres tall. HAITI’S TOPOGRAPHY 65% of this island nation is over a 7% gradient and bamboo grown on an incline drains faster and becomes some of the best construction grade bamboo in the world. WATER ABSORPTION One hectare of Guadua Bamboo can absorb up to 30,000 litres of water during the hurricane season and deposit this slowly back into the soil. With landslides being the deadly result of deforestation during these seasons this can be an instant life saver to rural communities in Haiti. CARBON ABSORPTION Bamboo can sequester up to twice as much carbon as trees. Given the worldwide drive to curb carbon bamboo could earn money for the grower. This would not only pay for the bamboo cultivation, but also provide livelihoods to those growing bamboo as well. A NEW ECONOMY Bamboo is used worldwide as a hard wearing, carbon friendly material for buildings and products, from such as this one can easily transfer and develop into other sectors, developing a new bamboo economy.
  9. 9. Architectural Association Haiti Visiting Programme PAGE 5 Site Plan N 0 2.5m 5m Existing Gingerbread House Proposed Residence Main Entrance Existing tree onsite
  10. 10. Ground Floor Plan 1 2 3 4 5 6 N 1. Bedroom 2. Living Room 3. Bathroom 4. Storage 5. Main entry 0 1m 2m
  11. 11. The Interior
  12. 12. 1. Colombian guadua bamboo 2. Haitian vulgaris bamboo 3. Concrete footings Bamboo Vulgaris Bamboo Guadua Bamboo Species 2 3 1 2 1 3 Location: Diameter: 4-10 cm Pole lengths: 10-20 m Climate: Tropical - Subtropical Location: Colombia Diameter: 10-15 cm (max 25cm) Pole lengths: 15-30 m Climate: Tropical - Subtropical
  13. 13. North Elevation Proposed Structure Cross bracing 2ND STORY FLOOR HEIGHT RESPECTED North Elevation
  14. 14. Truss Structure PRIMARY STRUCTURE 100mm poles ROOF STRUCTURE 50mm poles ROOF BEAM ROOF CROSS BRACING 75 mm poles CROSS BRACING 75 mm poles CROSS BRACING 100 mm poles CONCRETE FOOTING 0.5 m BRICK WALL 0 1m 2m 50mm poles
  15. 15. Section AA Concrete footing Footings A A 0 1m 2m 3 4 5 2 1 1. 10 cm bamboo poles 2. Steel rod 3. Concrete foundations 4. Steel rebar 5. Skylights Cement to be poured here and then sealed. 10mm diameter steel rebar North Concrete Footing
  16. 16. Structure Inspired by the ‘Gingerbread’ Style Structural Details Scale at A3 1:20 Scale at A3 1:40Scale at A3 1:40 OVERLAID WITH GINGERBREAD DETAILING MADAME GAUTHIER’S GINGERBREAD HOUSE DETAILING CONSTRUCTION POINTS ROOF TILTED TO ALLOW VENTILATION CONSTRUCTION POINTS CONSTRUCTION POINTS PROPOSED BAMBOO DETAILING BAMBOO COLUMN DETAILING CONCRETE FOOTING 0 1m 2m EAST ELEVATION Scale at A3 1:20 Scale at A3 1:40Scale at A3 1:40 OVERLAID WITH GINGERBREAD DETAILING MADAME GAUTHIER’S GINGERBREAD HOUSE DETAILING CONSTRUCTION POINTS ROOF TILTED TO ALLOW VENTILATION CONSTRUCTION POINTS CONSTRUCTION POINTS PROPOSED BAMBOO DETAILING BAMBOO COLUMN DETAILING CONCRETE FOOTING 0 1m 2m EAST ELEVATION
  17. 17. Given the importance of using this project as a means of training current carpenters to use bamboo, the structural system is designed to be built in a similar way to a timber structure. Truss Construction
  18. 18. Proposal for Mdme Viviane Gauthier’s Gingerbread House The Panels Bamboo panels to seal the residence from the elements 3 5 2 4 1 2 3 1. Roof grills 2. Upper screens 3. Dense screen between house and residence 4. Dense external screen 5. Awning frames 0 1m 2m
  19. 19. Metal Shingles Metal roof tiles can be manufactured at Croix des Bouquets. Skilled Artisans skill can create these tiles whilst supporting the local economy. Metal Shingle organisation Bamboo Purlins Bamboo Rafters Bamboo Slat nailing strips 1 Metal Shingles1 2 Metal Shingle organisation 2 3 Bamboo Slat nailing strips 3 4 Bamboo Rafters4 5 Bamboo Purlins5 Cross bracing bamboo columns 10 Skylight 8 Bamboo arch7 Side roof 9 Top chord6 The curvature of the metallic shingles on the roof can reduce the wind resistance on the roof in a hurricane, reducing the pressure build up. The Roof
  20. 20. The Roof 4 2 2 1. Main roof 2. 3. 4. Roof panels that allow light through 5. Existing tree on site 0 1m 2m 3 3 5 1 EXISTING TREE secondary cover can be added to weatherproof the interior. SKYLIGHTS Above the bedroom and the living room, glazed skylights allow light into the interior of the residence. Metalic tiles Rubber sealant cover Glazing panel
  21. 21. Title Title The Team Diego Perez Espitia PerezReiter Architects, Bogota, Colombia Diego Perez-Espitia is a registered Colombian architect. He graduated with honours from University of Los Andes (2000) and obtained his Masters degree in Architecture and Urbanism with a thesis on Parametric Urbanism at the Architectural Association’s Design Research Lab (2008). For the last seven years his work has focused on the application of algorithmic design techniques at a wide range of urban and architecture design projects. Diego has worked for Zaha Hadid Architects and MAD Architects, where he founded and lead the Parametric Design Team. He is now founding partner at PerezReiter Architects, based in Colombia and Austria, where he currently explores the potentials and constraints of generative design and digital fabrication through architecture and interior design commissions. Diego has taught at University of Los Andes (Bogota), Tsinghua University (Beijing) and the Architectural Association (London), and has lectured at universities and design institutes in Colombia, Wales, England, Turkey and China. He is Director of the AA Bogota Visiting School. Rose Di Sarno Gensler, Los Angels, USA Rose graduated from the University of Southern California in 2008 with a Bachelor of Architecture degree. During her time at USC, Rose travelled extensively through Southeast Asia, observing and studying the adaptive modernization of densely populated countries in which the extremes of the economic spectrum are visible. Paired with a team of students from the under-funded schools in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Professionally, Rose has worked in Beijing, China, where her projects ranged in scale from single family residential projects, to urban art installations, cultural centres and large scale commercial developments. She currently lives and works in Los Angles, California. John Osmond Naylor (Programme Director) Architectural Association John, originally from South Shields in the North of England, graduated from the Architectural Association, London in 2013. His interest lays in architecture as a tool for social development. The material of bamboo with its lightweight, seismic and and Haiti. In 2013 this work won him both the AA Holloway Prize and the Fosters Prize for Sustainable Development. Architecture, and rare architects. He has taught at the Architectural Association (London); Tsinghua University (Beijing); Singapore Polytechnic (Singapore); the Leeds School of Architecture (UK); and continues to direct the AA Visiting Programme in Haiti. Aditya Aachi Cullinan Studio, London, UK Aditya is currently a Part II Architect at Cullinan Studio in London. He gained his undergraduate degree at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL and his Diploma at the Architectural Association School of Architecture. While at the Architectural Association he was awarded the Foster+Partners and AA prize for Infrastructure. Aditya is interested in exploring the role of the architect in humanitarian and socio-politically complex situations. He has worked with various NGO’s and charities as well as the UN to deliver and develop both architectural projects and consultation tools. While working internationally for architecture practices such as Grimshaw Architects and Foster+ Partners, Aditya pursued his interests in infrastructure and political lobbying. He was part of the design team for the Lubetkin Prize winning Casa Kike at Gianni Botsford Architects. Nathalie Jolivert Architectural Designer, Port au Prince Nathalie graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2012 with a Bachelor of Architecture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. During her years at RISD she won the Gensler National Diversity Award in 2011 which featured her eco-touristic project for the indigenous Wayuu tribe of La Guajira in Colombia. Professionally, Nathalie worked on various projects with Architecture For Humanity and Studio Drum Collaborative in Haiti. As a painter, she also won a travel art residency to Bangladesh and Malawi with the USAID towards an exhibition at the Frontiers in Development Forum in Washington, DC (2014). In 2014 Nathalie attended the AA Haiti Visiting School and in 2015 joined us as an assistant tutor coordinating the school’s cultural programme. Nathalie currently lives and works in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Architectural Association Haiti Visiting Programme PAGE 21 The Team This project was a team effort between five tutors at the Architectural Association Visiting School of Haiti. John Naylor.......................AA Haiti Visiting School Director Diego Perez Espitia.........Perez Reiter Architects, Bogota Colombia Aditya Aachi.....................Cullinan Studio, London, UK Rose Disarno....................Gensler Los Angeles, USA and Myself. For more information about the AA Visiting School Haiti, Visit: haiti.aaschool.ac.uk
  22. 22. Saint-Margaret Convent Location: Port-au-Prince, Haïti Type: Residential - Post-Earthquake 2010 Reconstruction Year: 2014 Established in 1927, Saint-Margaret’s Convent provides a safe environment for the nuns of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti to carry out their services. Located in the heart of downtown Port-au-Prince, the convent’s facilities were destroyed during the 2010 earthquake. As the lead architect for this project at Studio Drum Collaborative, I was tasked to design a new ten-bedroom building in which the nuns could seamlessly carry out their daily rites. Nestled in dense vegetation, the convent’s new designs will pre- serve the sanctuarial atmosphere of the nuns’ religious immersion. In addition to residential units for the nuns, the amenities in Saint-Margaret’s Convent will include a private chapel, office rooms and common spaces for visitors.
  23. 23. URBAN CONTEXT SAINT-MARGARET SITE WITHIN THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH CAMPUS-BLOCK EXPLORATORY SKETCHES AND MODELS
  24. 24. MAIN FAÇADE Holy-Trinity Cathedral Site Rue Montalais
  25. 25. FIRST FLOOR PLAN with Central Chapel and common rooms SECOND FLOOR PLAN with dormitories and central terrace ROOF PLAN with canvas roof structure over balconies and open-air walkway
  26. 26. École Élie Dubois Location: Port-au-Prince, Haïti Type: Architectural Renovation- Post-Earthquake 2010 Year: 2014 École Élie Dubois is an all girls secondary school located in the historic district of Port-au-Prince, a few blocks fromt the National Palace. Established in 1913 by the Community of the Daughters of Mary, École Élie Dubois began as a vocational boarding school. The school currently offers the standard Baccalaureate curriculum as well as professional skills and vocational training courses for embroidery, fash- ion, and decorative arts. The original historic classroom building, which faces the main entrance on Rue du Centre, will undergo a complete renovation. The resto- ration work on this historic campus is supported by the Barefoot Foundation, Fon- dation CINA, Students Rebuild with the Bezos family Foundation and Interamerican Development Bank (IDB). As an architectrual consultant for Architecture for Humanity, I cordinated the archi- tectural and structural team to produce the Construction Documents for the reha- bilitation of Ecole Elie Dubois.
  27. 27. Interior view of top floor prior renovation process Mansard Roof under reconstruction
  28. 28. This project consisted in a close documentation of existing conditions, including that of a century old mansard roof that had to be entirely rebuilt
  29. 29. A concrete balcony added to the East Façade of the building in the 1970s had to be demolished as well because it caused dam- age to the original building during the earthquake of 2010
  30. 30. This balcony was to be replaced with a light-weight metal balcony with exterior staircases as second means of egress in case of another earthquake.
  31. 31. Building Local in Colombia Location: Valley of Cocora, Colombia Type: Design-Build with Guadua Bamboo Year: 2015 Building Local was a workshop that consisted in building a kiosk with the use of Guadua Bamboo in the Valley of Cocora, coffee region of Colombia. This workshop was organized by a Colombian architect and urbanist who previously led the housing projects of Morne Hercule and Morne Lazarre with UNOPS in Haiti, in which she has convinced the Haitian government to start using bamboo in the design of its housing projects post-earthquake. I attended the Building Local workshop along with two other Haitian colleagues whom I encouraged to sign-up in the longer goals of a stronger South-South cooperation between Haiti and Colombia in the bamboo industry. For more information on the workshop: www.buildinglocal.wordpress.com
  32. 32. During the Building Local workshop, we experienced with various Bamboo applications under the guidance of local architects and builders. We also benefitted from guest lecturers, and visited important bamboo constructions, such as the ZERI pavillion designed by the well-renown Colombian architect Simon Velez. A few team members standing on the kiosk’s rooftop Preparing door panels with flattened out bamboo strips Field-trip to the ZERI Pavilion designed by Simon VelezThe finished door panels
  33. 33. The Kiosk, final product of the 15 day long Building Local Workshop 2015
  34. 34. Davis Park Pavilion Location: Providence, Rhode Island Type: Design-Build , Community Project Year: 2008 The Architectural Design Principles Studio at RISD starts with a collaborative de- sign-build exercise. For this project we were assigned to design a structure which could provide seating or shading in Davis Park, a public park located in Provi- dence. The only construction materials allowed were wood members and rope. In our group, our goal was to be economical, and our design approach was to merge the art of weaving with space structure methods, for the design of a dy- namic piece. In our final proposal, the interweaving of wood and rope allowed for the assembly of a sculptural pavilion through which people could walk safely. Although our project did not provide as much shading as we hoped, it challenged us to learn about innovative design solutions, strength of materials, structure and the power of connection details.
  35. 35. Sketch models and construction process
  36. 36. Final product and the team
  37. 37. Bamboo Eco-Touristic Center Location: La Guajira, Colombia Type: Commercial Year: 2010 This project received the First Prize in the Gensler National Diversity Award in 2011 The RISD studio, Principles of Ecological Design, was a collaboration with the archi- tecture students at the Autonomous University of the Caribbean in Colombia. This Colombian school had been engaged by the Wayuu, an indigenous tribe, to help expand their village with the addition of a school, a clinic and commercial center. My proposal focuses on a tourist-accessible commercial center and is reminiscent of a traditional Wayuu structure, the enramada. There are no walls in the enramada. In this open space, the Wayuu welcome guests, weave and take naps in chichorros (hammocks). This commercial center is also designed to allow interaction, be- tween the local and global communitites. Women would sell their woven goods in small enramadas situated around a central communal eating space, where tour- ists enjoy Wayuu cuisine. An interweaving of different cultures would be fostered through mutual benefits.
  38. 38. RAIN-WATER CATCHMENT SYSTEM
  39. 39. Detail Drawing of Bamboo Connections inspired by Indigeous Colombian knotting practices Elevation of the Communal Restaurant
  40. 40. MIXED MEDIA This section contains various projects I worked on as a Freelance Designer and Painter. MIXED-MEDIA 1- Curiosités Urbaines, Solo Exhibition in Haiti......................................................... 2- Carnet de Voyages................................................................................................... 3- Brand Design Projects.............................................................................................. 4- Roof-Top Flyers in New York City............................................................................ 5- Swiss Embassy Mural in Haiti................................................................................... 6- Roots of Development Tapestry for the USAID................................................... Work produced for Curiosités Urbaines page 46 page48 page 49 page 50 page 51 page 53
  41. 41. CURIOSITÉS URBAINES I organized a Solo Exhibition which theme “Curiosités Urbaines” explored the urban landscape of Haiti. The black and white paintings depicted everyday scenes of the chaotic urban life of Port-au-Prince, and played with expressions commonly painted on the “tap-taps”, colorful privately-owned public automobiles. The exhibition took place in Port-au-Prince and was well received by visitors and the local press. 20% of profits went to the largest pediatrician hospital in Haiti: Hospital Saint-Damien, Nos Petits Frères et Soeurs. Solo Exhibition in Port-au-Prince, Haïti | 2016
  42. 42. CARNET DE VOYAGES Self-published book of illustrations depicting the immigrant’s experience and the contrast of journey between those who have the power to travel comfortably versus those who travel in the desperate need to escape hardships in their country of origin. The dark figures throughout the zine are inspired by the cut metal artwork of Haiti. Preface by historian Winter Schneider. Carnet de Voyages was exhibited at Yale University during the Odds and Ends Art Book Fair in December 2015. Self-published art-book | 2015
  43. 43. BRAND DESIGN Logo Design for “BAWOSYA Cooperative” a hand-made paper company based in Haiti - new initiative of the organization “Haiti Partners” www.haitipartners.org Logo Design for “Fondasyon Banbou” an upcoming organization bringing together various actors in the bamboo industry of Haïti www.fondasyonbanbou.wordpress.org Logo Design for “AYITATTOO” temporary tattoo design company inspired by the Haitian culture: www.ayitattoo.ht Select Logo Designs for Various Clients
  44. 44. BRAND DESIGN First set of illustrations and logo design for AYITATTOO a temporary tattoo business inspired by Haitian culture. The tattoos depict images of: * Haïti, written in the style of the lettering found on Tap-Taps * Erzulie, the Goddess of Love in Haitian Vaudou * The Palm Tree, symbol of freedom in Haiti * Tèt Chaje, common Kreyòl expression of an “explosive mind” * The Tap-Tap, colorful privately owned public automobile Ayitattoo illustrations for temporary tattoos inspired by Haitian Culture
  45. 45. This illustration draws inspiration from the subculture of rooftop pigeon herders in New York. Two summers ago, I was work- ing with a few artists and we were hanging out on their rooftop in Brooklyn, when around 5pm, we witnessed a swarm of pigeons fly out from a rooftop in what looked like a well-studied choreography. The oldest artist, who has lived in NY all his life, explained to us that this was a game that the residents in the area played. They inherited this tradition from European immigrants and appropriated it in Brooklyn. “Pigeons are social animals”, the artist explained. The owners who lose their pigeons to their neighbors’ flocks will later have to pay a sum to get them back. It was a nice evening in Brooklyn and it was quite calming for us to see the pigeons fly out from each rooftop and eventually group with each other. With summer, the season of rooftop gatherings is upon us. And with it the tradition of pigeon-herding. However, with the city expanding and the number of high-rise buildings soaring, I wonder what impact this may have on this age-old cher- ished tradition above ground, and what it ultimately means in the context of human-scale interactions, the animals and na- ture that have to co-habit. THE ROOFTOP FLYERS Proposal submitted to the 14 x 48 organization which goal is to exhibit artwork on vacant Billboards in New York City | 2016
  46. 46. MORNES ET MONTAGNES Acrylic Painting - 6’x12’ - Winning artwork in a National Competition organized by the Swiss Embassy in Haiti | 2014
  47. 47. In this painting, the goal was to celebrate different aspects of the Haitian and Swiss culture. “Mornes et Montagnes” written in the similar fonts found on the tap-taps [pub- lic buses of Haiti]refers to the mountains of both Haiti and Switzerland. In Haiti, mountains are often referred to as “Mòn” which in creole is derived from the french word “Mornes”. Switzerland mostly gets involved in agricultural projects in Haiti and thus, on the left, a mango tree seems to bear fruit as the sun shines light on Haiti behind the Swiss Alps. The Eidelweiss flower also grows on the Haitian side and on the Swiss Alps the symbols of the Vaudou god of crossroads “Papa Legba” are drawn on the ground. The sunrays circle is continued with the long horns of the Swiss Alps folkloric musical tradition. Finally, the Hispaniolan Trogon, endangered national bird of Haiti is also illustrat- ed in the mango tree. MORNES ET MONTAGNES Sketches and Research Process
  48. 48. ROOTS OF DEVELOPMENT Hand-Sown Tapestry and Acrylic Painting - 9’x16’ - RISD x USAID Artist in Residency Program | 2014
  49. 49. Upon my art research on the overlap between the sectors of development and human virtues, conducted over a series of collaborative sessions at the Chancellor’s College of Malawi and Dhaka University, I developed an allegory of development and virtue. The tapestry here uses a metaphorical visual language to illustrate the interconnected- ness of the development pillars of Climate Change, Water and Sanitation, Infrastructure, along with the related virtues: Respect, Dignity, Compassion, Justice, Love, Patience, and Courage. The relationships between the “sectors” and the virtues are motivated by conversations with members of poor communities in Malawi, Bangladesh, and Haïti; as well as exchanges with the students in Malawi and Bangladesh, and mission officers of USAID in those countires, who helped illuminate the challenges of international de- velopment, and reflected personally on the virtues inherent in that work. Haiti is evoked by the presence of the endangered red-breasted Hispaniolan Trogon, a national sym- bol of hope and resilience, but also of fragility and challenge. ROOTS OF DEVELOPMENT Art Research and Workshops in Bangladesh and Malawi - RISD x USAID Artist in Residency Program | 2014
  50. 50. THANK YOU! Nathalie Jolivert Contact Information: jolivertnathalie@gmail.com www.jolivert.com 114-0 224 Street, Cambria Heigths New York, NY 11411

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