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Physics of pokemon

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Physics of pokemon

  1. 1. The Physics of
  2. 2. The Physics of
  3. 3. The Physics of
  4. 4. Preview• History
  5. 5. Preview• History• Concepts:
  6. 6. Preview• History• Concepts: • #1 Pokeball Throwing
  7. 7. Preview• History• Concepts: • #1 Pokeball Throwing • #2 Pikachu’s Thunderbolt
  8. 8. Preview• History• Concepts: • #1 Pokeball Throwing • #2 Pikachu’s Thunderbolt • #3 Charmander’s FLamethrower
  9. 9. Preview• History• Concepts: • #1 Pokeball Throwing • #2 Pikachu’s Thunderbolt • #3 Charmander’s FLamethrower• Review
  10. 10. Preview• History• Concepts: • #1 Pokeball Throwing • #2 Pikachu’s Thunderbolt • #3 Charmander’s FLamethrower• Review• Closing
  11. 11. History of Pokemon
  12. 12. History of Pokemon• Contrary to popular belief, the Pokemon TV series isnt how the craze was started.  It was actually started with the Game Boy game called "Pocket Monsters" in Japan in 1995.  It was an instant hit and it eventually got its own TV series of the same name in April of 1997.
  13. 13. History of Pokemon• Contrary to popular belief, the Pokemon TV series isnt how the craze was started.  It was actually started with the Game Boy game called "Pocket Monsters" in Japan in 1995.  It was an instant hit and it eventually got its own TV series of the same name in April of 1997.• The first Pokemon game released was “Pokemon Red.” It was released on February 27th, 1996.
  14. 14. History of Pokemon• Contrary to popular belief, the Pokemon TV series isnt how the craze was started.  It was actually started with the Game Boy game called "Pocket Monsters" in Japan in 1995.  It was an instant hit and it eventually got its own TV series of the same name in April of 1997.• The first Pokemon game released was “Pokemon Red.” It was released on February 27th, 1996.• The first show of Pokemon aired in Japan on April 1st, 1997.
  15. 15. History of Pokemon• Contrary to popular belief, the Pokemon TV series isnt how the craze was started.  It was actually started with the Game Boy game called "Pocket Monsters" in Japan in 1995.  It was an instant hit and it eventually got its own TV series of the same name in April of 1997.• The first Pokemon game released was “Pokemon Red.” It was released on February 27th, 1996.• The first show of Pokemon aired in Japan on April 1st, 1997.• There are currently 17 Pokemon handheld games out, and another 2 on the way.
  16. 16. Concept #1
  17. 17. P keball Thr wing
  18. 18. P keball Thr wing• When throwing a pokeball, Ash uses projectile motion Video
  19. 19. So to break it down:• Projectile motion occurs when an object is thrown obliquely near the earth’s surface, as it moves along a curved path.
  20. 20. So to break it down:• Projectile motion occurs when an object is thrown obliquely near the earth’s surface, as it moves along a curved path.• The path followed by a projectile is called its trajectory, which is directly influenced by gravity.
  21. 21. So to break it down:• Projectile motion occurs when an object is thrown obliquely near the earth’s surface, as it moves along a curved path.• The path followed by a projectile is called its trajectory, which is directly influenced by gravity.• Newtons First law (Law of Inertia) states: an object in motion, stays in motion.
  22. 22. So to break it down:• Projectile motion occurs when an object is thrown obliquely near the earth’s surface, as it moves along a curved path.• The path followed by a projectile is called its trajectory, which is directly influenced by gravity.• Newtons First law (Law of Inertia) states: an object in motion, stays in motion.• Without gravity, a projectile would just be considered an object that travels at a constant speed in the same direction.
  23. 23. WordProblems
  24. 24. Variables• V= Initial velocity (m/s)• A= Launch angle (degrees)• g= Acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2)• M = Meters (?)
  25. 25. Variables• V= Initial velocity (m/s)• A= Launch angle (degrees)• g= Acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2)• M = Meters (?) Horizontal Distance= (V^2 x sine (2 x A)) /g
  26. 26. So...If Ash threw a pokeball at a Meowth with aninitial velocity of 10 m/s, and at an angle of 45degrees, how far would the pokeball travel if youwere to exclude air resistance?
  27. 27. So...If Ash threw a pokeball at a Meowth with aninitial velocity of 10 m/s, and at an angle of 45degrees, how far would the pokeball travel if youwere to exclude air resistance? Horizontal Distance= (V^2 x sine (2 x A)) /g
  28. 28. So...If Ash threw a pokeball at a Meowth with aninitial velocity of 10 m/s, and at an angle of 45degrees, how far would the pokeball travel if youwere to exclude air resistance? Horizontal Distance= (V^2 x sine (2 x A)) /g =(10^2 x sine (2 x 45))/9.8 =(100 x sine (90))/9.8 =100/9.8 =10.2 meters, which was not far enough to capture Meowth
  29. 29. Sadly, Ash was a little to weak to throw his pokeballall the way to the Meowth. So instead...IfMr.Zaucha threw a pokeball at a Meowth with aninitial velocity of 20 m/s, and at an angle of 45degrees, how far would the pokeball travel if youwere to exclude air resistance?
  30. 30. Sadly, Ash was a little to weak to throw his pokeballall the way to the Meowth. So instead...IfMr.Zaucha threw a pokeball at a Meowth with aninitial velocity of 20 m/s, and at an angle of 45degrees, how far would the pokeball travel if youwere to exclude air resistance? Horizontal Distance= (V^2 x sine (2 x A)) /g
  31. 31. Sadly, Ash was a little to weak to throw his pokeballall the way to the Meowth. So instead...IfMr.Zaucha threw a pokeball at a Meowth with aninitial velocity of 20 m/s, and at an angle of 45degrees, how far would the pokeball travel if youwere to exclude air resistance? Horizontal Distance= (V^2 x sine (2 x A)) /g (20^2 x sine (2 x 45)) /9.8 (400 x sine (90)) /9.8 400/9.8 =40.82 meters, which was just enough to capture Meowth!
  32. 32. Graph Pokeball Throwing Projectiles 100 91.84 80 60 distance (m) 40.82 40 20 10.2 0 0 0 10 20 30 velocity (m/s)There is a direct relationship between the distanceand velocity of the projectile. As one increases, so does the other.
  33. 33. Concept #2
  34. 34. Pikachu’sThunderbolt
  35. 35. Pikachu’s Thunderbolt• In the tv series and video games, pokemon are used to fight, or vs., other pokemon. They use specialized attacks that usually include one of the many well-known elements of our world.
  36. 36. Pikachu’s Thunderbolt• In the tv series and video games, pokemon are used to fight, or vs., other pokemon. They use specialized attacks that usually include one of the many well-known elements of our world.• Pikachu, is considered to be an “electric type.”
  37. 37. Pikachu’s Thunderbolt• In the tv series and video games, pokemon are used to fight, or vs., other pokemon. They use specialized attacks that usually include one of the many well-known elements of our world.• Pikachu, is considered to be an “electric type.”• To defeat most of his many foes, Pikachu uses a very well-known attack called “lightning.”
  38. 38. An Example of Pikachu’s Lightning Attack Video
  39. 39. How?In order to create some sort of truth behindPikachu and his lightning attack, we must look athim as if he is an electrostatic storm cloud. =
  40. 40. Before any and all lightning strikes, polarization takes place. The polarization of positive and negative charges takes place within the storm cloud, creating a “stage” for a stepped leadder. A stepped ladder is a path of ionized air which extends downward from a thunderstormduring the initial stages of a lightning strike. Multiple branches, or steps, travel downward until the final step leader reaches the ground, a tall object on the ground, or a positivestreamer extending upward from a ground object. The lightning strike begins when a large negative electric current flows along the path defined by the step leaders from the thundercloud to the ground.
  41. 41. Video
  42. 42. So to break it down:• Pikachu is like a storm cloud, with his upper half made up of positive charges, and his lower half made up of negative ones.
  43. 43. So to break it down:• Pikachu is like a storm cloud, with his upper half made up of positive charges, and his lower half made up of negative ones.• So when Pikachu is ready to attack another pokemon, he uses the negative charges in him, to create a stepped leader. (Like the cloud)
  44. 44. So to break it down:• Pikachu is like a storm cloud, with his upper half made up of positive charges, and his lower half made up of negative ones.• So when Pikachu is ready to attack another pokemon, he uses the negative charges in him, to create a stepped leader. (Like the cloud)• The stepped leader connects with the positive stepped leader that his opponent creates, thus resulting in his “Lightning attack.”
  45. 45. So to break it down:• Pikachu is like a storm cloud, with his upper half made up of positive charges, and his lower half made up of negative ones.• So when Pikachu is ready to attack another pokemon, he uses the negative charges in him, to create a stepped leader. (Like the cloud)• The stepped leader connects with the positive stepped leader that his opponent creates, thus resulting in his “Lightning attack.”• Pikachu is an electric type, so the lightning will not affect him, but it will greatly affect his opponent.
  46. 46. So to break it down:• Pikachu is like a storm cloud, with his upper half made up of positive charges, and his lower half made up of negative ones.• So when Pikachu is ready to attack another pokemon, he uses the negative charges in him, to create a stepped leader. (Like the cloud)• The stepped leader connects with the positive stepped leader that his opponent creates, thus resulting in his “Lightning attack.”• Pikachu is an electric type, so the lightning will not affect him, but it will greatly affect his opponent.• His natural negative charge is the reason why his attacks are super effective against water types.
  47. 47. WordProblems
  48. 48. Variables• I = Current of Lightning Bolt• C = Coulombs• T = Seconds (s)• A = Amperes (?)
  49. 49. Variables• I = Current of Lightning Bolt• C = Coulombs• T = Seconds (s)• A = Amperes (?) I=CxT
  50. 50. So...If Pikachu used his “Lightning attack” on Emma,how much current would she receive if the boltdelivered a charge of 35 coulombs to her in a timeof 1/1000 second?
  51. 51. So...If Pikachu used his “Lightning attack” on Emma,how much current would she receive if the boltdelivered a charge of 35 coulombs to her in a timeof 1/1000 second? I=CxT
  52. 52. So...If Pikachu used his “Lightning attack” on Emma,how much current would she receive if the boltdelivered a charge of 35 coulombs to her in a timeof 1/1000 second? I=CxT I = (35 C)(0.001 s) I = 35,000 amps ...Emma would be fried...
  53. 53. BUT, if Pikachu used his “Lightning attack” on Eric,how much current would he receive if the boltdelivered a charge of 70 coulombs to him in a timeof 1/1000 second?
  54. 54. BUT, if Pikachu used his “Lightning attack” on Eric,how much current would he receive if the boltdelivered a charge of 70 coulombs to him in a timeof 1/1000 second? I=CxT
  55. 55. BUT, if Pikachu used his “Lightning attack” on Eric,how much current would he receive if the boltdelivered a charge of 70 coulombs to him in a timeof 1/1000 second? I=CxT I = (70 C)(0.001 s) I = 70,000 amps Sorry Eric...but you’ve been vaporized...
  56. 56. Graph Pikachus Thunderbolt 12,500 10,500 10,000 7,500 7,000Amperage 5,000 3,500 2,500 0 0 0 35 70 105 Couloumbs
  57. 57. Concept #3
  58. 58. Charmader’s Flamethrower• In the Pokemon series, Charmander is considered to be a “fire type.”
  59. 59. Charmader’s Flamethrower• In the Pokemon series, Charmander is considered to be a “fire type.”• Charmander uses a move called “flamethrower” which causes his enemies to ignite on fire, burning them to defeat!
  60. 60. Charmader’s Flamethrower• In the Pokemon series, Charmander is considered to be a “fire type.”• Charmander uses a move called “flamethrower” which causes his enemies to ignite on fire, burning them to defeat!• Charmander’s tail is constantly on fire, which is also gauges how strong his attacks will be. The bigger the flame, the stronger he gets.
  61. 61. An Example of Charmander’s Flamethrower Video
  62. 62. How?In order for Charmander’s Flamethrower attackto have any sort of real life application, we mustvisualize Charmander to be somewhat of ahuman fire breather.
  63. 63. How?In order for Charmander’s Flamethrower attackto have any sort of real life application, we mustvisualize Charmander to be somewhat of ahuman fire breather. =
  64. 64. How?In order for Charmander’s Flamethrower attackto have any sort of real life application, we mustvisualize Charmander to be somewhat of ahuman fire breather. =
  65. 65. Fire breathing is an art that involvesthe use of fuel, fire, and breathing. Fire breathing occurs when a fire breather takes in a mouthful of fuel, and spits it out onto an open flame, creating a fireball.
  66. 66. Video
  67. 67. So to break it down:• The fire that is seen in Charmnder’s attack, is actually the result of an exothermic reaction, because it releases heat (energy).
  68. 68. So to break it down:• The fire that is seen in Charmnder’s attack, is actually the result of an exothermic reaction, because it releases heat (energy).• What causes that heat, is the spontaneous combustion of a fuel and oxygen, which ends up creating a large amount of heat that is released.
  69. 69. So to break it down:• The fire that is seen in Charmnder’s attack, is actually the result of an exothermic reaction, because it releases heat (energy).• What causes that heat, is the spontaneous combustion of a fuel and oxygen, which ends up creating a large amount of heat that is released.• In this case, Charmander must contain some sort of fluid within him such as Kerosene.
  70. 70. So to break it down:• The fire that is seen in Charmnder’s attack, is actually the result of an exothermic reaction, because it releases heat (energy).• What causes that heat, is the spontaneous combustion of a fuel and oxygen, which ends up creating a large amount of heat that is released.• In this case, Charmander must contain some sort of fluid within him such as Kerosene.• He uses it to ignite a fire in his body, which he continuously blows outward, creating a line of fire.
  71. 71. So to break it down:• The fire that is seen in Charmnder’s attack, is actually the result of an exothermic reaction, because it releases heat (energy).• What causes that heat, is the spontaneous combustion of a fuel and oxygen, which ends up creating a large amount of heat that is released.• In this case, Charmander must contain some sort of fluid within him such as Kerosene.• He uses it to ignite a fire in his body, which he continuously blows outward, creating a line of fire.• The oxygen in the air helps support the reaction between the fuel and heat, causing the fire to last longer, and burn stronger.
  72. 72. Fire Triangle
  73. 73. WordProblems
  74. 74. Variables• M = Mass (in grams)• C = Specific heat (4.184 j/degree/g)• T = Change in temperature• L = Latent Heat of Vaporization (2600 kJ/kg)• Q = Added heat
  75. 75. Variables• M = Mass (in grams)• C = Specific heat (4.184 j/degree/g)• T = Change in temperature• L = Latent Heat of Vaporization (2600 kJ/kg)• Q = Added heat Q = (M x C x T) + (L x M)
  76. 76. So...If Charmander got hungry and used hisflamethrower attack to pop a single corn ofpopcorn that contained 0.14grams of water in it,and needed to change the temperature from 30degrees Celsius to 100 degrees celsius, how muchheat would it take?
  77. 77. So...If Charmander got hungry and used hisflamethrower attack to pop a single corn ofpopcorn that contained 0.14grams of water in it,and needed to change the temperature from 30degrees Celsius to 100 degrees celsius, how muchheat would it take? Q = (M x C x T) + (L x M)
  78. 78. So...If Charmander got hungry and used hisflamethrower attack to pop a single corn ofpopcorn that contained 0.14grams of water in it,and needed to change the temperature from 30degrees Celsius to 100 degrees celsius, how muchheat would it take? Q = (M x C x T) + (L x M) = (0.14 x 4.184 x 70) + (2260 x .014) = (41) + (362) = 357 J
  79. 79. Unfortunately, Charmander was still hungry, so ifhe used his flamethrower attack to pop anothersingle corn of popcorn that contained 0.28gramsof water in it, and needed to change thetemperature from 30 degrees Celsius to 100degrees celsius, how much heat would it take?
  80. 80. Unfortunately, Charmander was still hungry, so ifhe used his flamethrower attack to pop anothersingle corn of popcorn that contained 0.28gramsof water in it, and needed to change thetemperature from 30 degrees Celsius to 100degrees celsius, how much heat would it take? Q = (M x C x T) + (L x M)
  81. 81. Unfortunately, Charmander was still hungry, so ifhe used his flamethrower attack to pop anothersingle corn of popcorn that contained 0.28gramsof water in it, and needed to change thetemperature from 30 degrees Celsius to 100degrees celsius, how much heat would it take? Q = (M x C x T) + (L x M) = (0.28 x 4.184 x 70) + (2260 x 0.28) = (82) + (633) = 715 J
  82. 82. Graph Charmanders Flamethrower 1,250 1,072 1,000 750 715Added Heat 500 357 250 0 0 0 0.14 0.28 0.42 Grams of water
  83. 83. Review• Brief History of the Pokemon Franchise• Concepts:• #1 Projectile Motion and some examples of where it is used in our lives• #2 Pikachu’s Thunderbolt and how lightning occurs• #3 Charmander’s Flamethrower and how fire breathing works• Today I hoped to have educated you all on the physics of Pokemon and how physics can be found in even the most strange things.

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