Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Proprietary and Confidential
UNI Strategic
Strategic Business Growth
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
September 23-24, 2013
2Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Agenda—Day 2
Agenda Item Time
Session #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth 09:00—10:40...
3Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Content
! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy
! Session #2—Conduct...
4Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Pursuing Inorganic Growth
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
“Go for a business that...
5Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Inorganic Growth—Framework
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
Existing Products to
E...
6Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
1) Strategic Alliances
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! A strategic alliance is ...
7Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
1) Strategic Alliances—Examples
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
•  Pharmaceutical...
8Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Research &
Development
2) Joint Ventures
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! Tradit...
9Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Joint Ventures—Hulu & Sony-Ericsson
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
•  Video s...
10Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Mergers & Acquisitions
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! Mergers and acquisit...
11Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Mergers & Acquisitions—Creating Value
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! While...
12Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Mergers & Acquisitions—What’s the Motivation?
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth...
13Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Mergers & Acquisitions—Keys to Successful Integration
#5—Pursuing Inorgani...
14Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Mergers & Acquisitions—Google
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
•  In 2006 Goog...
15Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
4) Mergers & Acquisitions—Vertical Mergers
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! A v...
16Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
4) Vertical Mergers—Apple Inc. (4-in-1)
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
Apple In...
17Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
4) Vertical Mergers—High-profile Examples
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
In 199...
18Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Horizontal Mergers
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! A horizontal merger occu...
19Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Horizontal Mergers—ExxonMobil
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
The merge of Ex...
20Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Horizontal Mergers—Microsoft & Skype
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
Microsof...
21Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Horizontal Mergers—InBev & Anheuser Busch
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
In ...
22Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
A pure conglomerate merger is
one where the merging
companies are doing busin...
23Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
6) Conglomerates—ITT
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
The original International ...
24Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
6) Conglomerate—The Rise and Fall
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! Conglomerate...
25Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
M&A Activity Likely To Pick Up Soon
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! However, m...
26Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Landscape for Increased M&A
#5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth
! In general, there ...
27Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Content
! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy
! Session #2—Conduc...
28Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Developing a Business Growth Strategy
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strateg...
29Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Developing a Business Growth Strategy—Components
#6—Developing a Business Gro...
30Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
1) Determine Risk/Reward Position
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
! ...
31Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
! Growth...
32Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Overview
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy...
33Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Process
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
...
34Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Options
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
...
35Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Strategy Decision Trees
#6—Developing a Business ...
36Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Business Simulations
#6—Developing a Business Gro...
37Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Explore Growth Scenarios—War Gaming
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strate...
38Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Conduct Market Research—Overview
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
...
39Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Conduct Market Research—Qualitative
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strate...
40Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Conduct Market Research—Quantitative
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strat...
41Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Pros Cons
Qualitative
Research
•  Allows one to explore topics in more depth
...
42Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Conduct Market Research—Primary vs. Secondary
#6—Developing a Business Gro...
43Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Conduct Market Research—Illustrated
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strate...
44Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Conduct Market Research—Illustrated
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strate...
45Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
4) Create Business Case—Outline
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
Stra...
46Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
4) Create Business Case—Multiple Methodologies
#6—Developing a Business Growt...
47Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Articulate Value Proposition
#6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy
! Wh...
48Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Articulate Value Proposition—Template
#6—Developing a Business Growth Stra...
49Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Articulate Value Proposition—Alternate Model
#6—Developing a Business Grow...
50Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
5) Articulate Value Proposition—Disguised Example
#6—Developing a Business Gr...
51Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Practical Exercise #3—Building a Value Proposition
#6—Developing a Business G...
52Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Content
! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy
! Session #2—Conduc...
53Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Organizational Readiness & Implementation
#7—Organizational Readiness & Imple...
54Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Organizational Readiness—Frame of Reference
#7—Organizational Readiness & Imp...
55Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Make
Changes to
Structure
Building Blocks of an Implementation Program
#7—Org...
56Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Management
Selection &
Development
Corporate
Culture
Leadership Style
Organiz...
57Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
2) Clarify Decision Rights
#7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation
! Res...
58Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
3) Design Information Flows
#7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation
! Ab...
59Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
4) Monitor the Plan
•  Challenge underlying assumptions
•  Create a champion ...
60Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Performance Gaps
•  Where are we now?
•  Where do we want to be?
•  How will ...
61Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Performance Gap Closure—OGSM
#7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation
! T...
62Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
OGSM—Disguised Example (Partial)
#7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation...
63Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Potential Options to Improve Strategy-Execution Capabilities
Establish indivi...
64Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
#7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation
•  Inability to “just say no”
• ...
65Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
How Do You Know When You’ve Nailed It?
•  Everyone has a solid understanding ...
66Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Royal Mail—Communication Is Vital In Delivering Change
#7—Organizational Read...
67Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Time Warner & AOL—What Were They Thinking?
#7—Organizational Readiness & Impl...
68Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Practical Exercise #4—Organizational Readiness Considerations
#7—Organization...
69Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Content
! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy
! Session #2—Conduc...
70Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics
#8—Metrics & Tracking
“However beautiful the strategy,
you s...
71Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics
#8—Metrics & Tracking
“What gets measured,
gets managed.”
—P...
72Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics—Defined
#8—Metrics & Tracking
! It's important to remember t...
73Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics—Objectives
#8—Metrics & Tracking
! Business metrics should b...
74Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics—Types
#8—Metrics & Tracking
How do
customers
respond to your...
75Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics—KPI Dashboard
#8—Metrics & Tracking
! It is often useful to ...
76Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics—Illustrative Dashboard
#8—Metrics & Tracking
! Below is a bu...
77Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Business Metrics—Guiding Principles
#8—Metrics & Tracking
! The following rep...
78Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Practical Exercise #5—Identifying Business Growth Metrics
#8—Metrics & Tracki...
Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic
Contact Information
Mitch Duckler
Managing Partner
FullSurge
+1 (312) 239-8985
...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Strategic business growth—day 2 2013.09

9,774 views

Published on

This two-day workshop helped participants craft a high-potential business growth strategy that capitalizes on marketplace opportunities while leveraging organizational competencies and competitive advantages. Day 2 of the workshop consists of four modules: 1) utilizing research and analytical methodologies to inform and achieve strategic business goals, 2) implementing business growth strategy for creating high-impact value propositions, 3) assessing organizational readiness and implementation for effective execution of growth strategies, and 4) measuring and monitoring the progress of business development and growth.

Published in: Business
  • Login to see the comments

Strategic business growth—day 2 2013.09

  1. 1. Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Strategic Business Growth Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia September 23-24, 2013
  2. 2. 2Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Agenda—Day 2 Agenda Item Time Session #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth 09:00—10:40 Refreshments & Networking Break 10:40—11:00 Session #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy 11:00—12:45 Luncheon 12:45—14:00 Session #7—Organizational Readiness & Implement. 14:00—15:30 Refreshments & Networking Break 15:30—15:50 Session #8—Measuring and Tracking 15:50—17:00 *Times are approximate—Sessions may cut across breaks
  3. 3. 3Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Content ! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy ! Session #2—Conducting a Current State Assessment ! Session #3—Articulating a Business Growth Vision ! Session #4—Driving Organic Growth ! Session #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Session #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Session #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Session #8—Measuring and Tracking
  4. 4. 4Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Pursuing Inorganic Growth #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth “Go for a business that any idiot can run—because sooner or later any idiot probably is going to run it.” —Peter Lynch
  5. 5. 5Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Inorganic Growth—Framework #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth Existing Products to Existing Customers Growth Strategies Organic Strategies Entering New Industries New Products & Services Existing Products to New Customers Takeover/ Acquisition Mergers Joint Venture Strategic Alliance Horizontal Vertical Conglomerates New Business Models Vertical Horizontal Unrelated New to Company New to World New Geographies New Channels New Segments Inorganic Strategies
  6. 6. 6Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 1) Strategic Alliances #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! A strategic alliance is an agreement between two or more parties to pursue a set of agreed upon objectives while remaining independent organizations. This form of cooperation lies between Mergers & Acquisition and organic growth •  Allowing each partner to concentrate on their competitive advantage •  Learning from partners and developing competencies that may be more widely exploited elsewhere •  Adequate suitability of the resources and competencies of an organization for it to survive •  To reduce political risk while entering into a new market •  Risk of losing control over proprietary information, especially regarding complex transactions requiring extensive coordination and information sharing •  Coordination difficulties due to informal cooperation settings and highly costly dispute resolution •  Agency costs: As the benefit of monitoring the alliance’s activities effectively is not fully captured by any firm, a free rider problem arises •  Influence costs because of the absence of a formal hierarchy and administration within the alliance Pros Cons Source: wiki.com
  7. 7. 7Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 1) Strategic Alliances—Examples #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth •  Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly has been forming alliances for nearly a century and was the first in their industry to establish an office devoted to alliance management •  Lilly currently has over one hundred partnerships around the world devoted to discovery, development, and marketing •  Lilly partners with the Belgium-based company Galapagos to develop treatments for osteoporosis and Canada's BioMS medical group in a licensing and development agreement for a novel treatment for multiple sclerosis •  In Japan, Lilly is partnering with Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co., Ltd., to bring a targeted cancer treatment to market •  Hewlett-Packard and Disney have a long-standing alliance, starting back in 1938, when Disney purchased eight oscillators to use in the sound design of Fantasia from HP founders Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard •  When Disney wanted to develop a virtual attraction called Mission: SPACE, Disney Imagineers and HP engineers relied on HP's IT architecture, servers and workstations to create Disney's most technologically advanced attraction
  8. 8. 8Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Research & Development 2) Joint Ventures #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Traditionally the various forms of integration—vertical, horizontal, lateral—have been predominant; now joint ventures are becoming more significant and commonplace Fully Integrated Production & Marketing Purchasing Networking Domestic & International A fully integrated joint venture closely resembles a merger. In this arrangement, firms integrate all of their functions, from manufacturing to sales. They may integrate functions in just one area of business, such as a particular product line, or all areas. In research and development joint ventures, firms pool their skills, knowledge or equipment to develop better products, services or production methods. Each firm's area of expertise may benefit the other, allowing the firms to develop these outputs more efficiently. Firms may either produce goods or services together, or market them together. In some cases they do both. Combining their facilities, equipment and methods can allow firms to produce goods more efficiently. They may jointly produce a product, or produce their own products using combined resources. An agreement to purchase goods together gives both firms more marketing power. They typically purchase goods at a lower rate by purchasing them in larger amounts, which they divide between each other. Firms can also reduce costs by storing goods together and sharing the administrative staff. In some industries, joint ventures between firms create a network that better serves customers. The telecomm, banking and transportation industries are examples of networking joint ventures. Banks use large networks to process credit card transactions and allow customers access to their funds via ATMs. Any of the above joint ventures can take place between two firms within the same country, or two firms from different countries. Firms from different countries often join together to broaden their market bases. Source: wiki.fool.com
  9. 9. 9Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Joint Ventures—Hulu & Sony-Ericsson #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth •  Video streaming site Hulu is a joint venture of News Corp (owns Fox ), Disney (owns ABC) and Comcast (owns NBC) that has been extremely successful •  The companies compete with one another on the TV airwaves but recognized that combining their programs for an online video service would be more powerful than launching individual products. It’s been a good bet - potential suitors to purchase Hulu have lined up with bids that approach $1 billion •  Sony-Ericsson is a 2001 joint venture by Japanese consumer electronics company Sony Corp. and Swedish telecommunications company Ericsson to make mobile phones that helped turn around Sony's struggling mobile business and gave its phones a strong international presence •  With the sudden rise of smartphones, Sony wanted to better integrate platforms to provide a consistent experience across phones, TVs, tablets and PCs •  In 2012 Sony purchased Ericsson’s share of joint venture and turned the company into a subsidiary - Sony Mobile Communications
  10. 10. 10Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Mergers & Acquisitions #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Mergers and acquisitions are closely related, but it is important to separate the two because there are some meaningful distinctions
  11. 11. 11Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Mergers & Acquisitions—Creating Value #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! While M&A activity has drawn its fair share of criticism over the years, there are proponents who are convinced of their value-creation benefits Mergers can increase shareholder value by: ! Reducing costs by combining departments, operations, and trimming the workforce ! Increasing revenue by absorbing a major competitor and winning more market share ! Cross-selling products or services ! Creating tax savings when a profitable company buys a money-loser ! Diversifying to stabilize earning results and boost investor confidence Source: www.accenture.com
  12. 12. 12Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Mergers & Acquisitions—What’s the Motivation? #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth Source: www.tutor2u.net
  13. 13. 13Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Mergers & Acquisitions—Keys to Successful Integration #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! To increase chances of success, acquirers need to perform rigorous due diligence before the purchase to verify the company's stand-alone value and uncover potential problems •  Setting integration priorities based on the merger's strategic rationale and goals •  Articulating and communicating the deal's vision by merger leaders •  Designing the new organization and operating plan •  Customizing the integration plan to address specific challenges: Act quickly to capture economies of scale •  Refine a business model and sacrifice speed to get the model right, such as understanding brand positioning and product growth opportunities •  Aggressively implement the integration plan: by Day 100, the merged company should be operating and contributing value Conducting Due Diligence:
  14. 14. 14Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Mergers & Acquisitions—Google #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth •  In 2006 Google acquired 19-month old YouTube for $1.65 billion in a stock-for-stock transaction •  Google executives confirmed that the company bought YouTube in part to better position itself for getting into the business of selling traditional television advertising •  At the time of the takeover, there was concern that Google would destroy the fast-growing video-sharing site – it seems the pessimists were wrong! •  YouTube now generates annual revenues for Google of $3.6b per year (Google's total revenues in 2012 were around $33m) and viewership grew by 50% in 2012 alone •  Google’s preferred growth strategy is Mergers & Acquisitions because it allows them to quickly adopt to new technologies and process rather than trying to develop them internally •  YouTube, Android, Motorola Source: www.tutor2u.net
  15. 15. 15Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 4) Mergers & Acquisitions—Vertical Mergers #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! A vertical merger is between two companies producing different goods or services for one specific finished product; one firm acquires either a customer or a supplier •  This type of merger eliminates competition between the two firms •  Most often the logic behind the merger is to increase synergies created by merging firms that would be more efficient operating as one •  By directly merging with suppliers, a company can decrease reliance and increase profitability •  An example of a vertical merger is a car manufacturer purchasing a tire company, thereby reducing cost of tires for the automaker and potentially expand business to supply tires to competing automakers
  16. 16. 16Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 4) Vertical Mergers—Apple Inc. (4-in-1) #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth Apple Inc. is vertically integrated because it is essentially four companies in one, thereby controlling all the major critical parts of the supply chain used to make and sell its products: ! It is a hardware company (it designs its own hardware) ! A software company (it owns, develops and optimizes its software) ! A services company (it equips its products with services such as the iTunes and iCloud) ! A retail company (it provides consumers with a unique retail experience) •  As opposed to other computer, tablet or smartphone companies that only design or make the hardware, and rely on other suppliers for the operating system and related applications, and to sell the product
  17. 17. 17Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 4) Vertical Mergers—High-profile Examples #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth In 1991 Disney outsourced the production of 3D animated films to Pixar because there was a lot of uncertainty around the potential of 3D animation. By 2006, vertical integration became necessary because Pixar was taking advantage of Disney’s dependence to constantly renegotiate contracts ! Some of the best known examples of vertical integration have been in the oil industry. In the 1970s and 1980s, many companies that were primarily engaged in exploration and the extraction of crude petroleum decided to acquire downstream refineries and distribution Companies such as Shell and BP came to control every step involved in bringing oil from its North Sea or Alaskan origins to a vehicle's fuel tank In 2000 internet provider America Online combined with media conglomerate Time Warner. Time Warner supplied content to consumers through properties like CNN and Time Magazine, while AOL distributed such information via its internet service
  18. 18. 18Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Horizontal Mergers #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! A horizontal merger occurs between companies in the same industry. It is a business consolidation that occurs between firms who operate in the same space, often as competitors offering the same good or service •  Mergers of equals are said to protect the interests of the acquired firm •  The acquired firm is integrated into the structure of the acquiring firm •  Usually one of the goals is to achieve savings by eliminating redundancy •  Sound business principles prescribe that the best facilities and the most highly qualified personnel be retained regardless of the previous company affiliation •  The elimination of redundancies and leveraging of shared best practices, leadership, processes, and technology position the combined company better for achieving growth and productivity
  19. 19. 19Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Horizontal Mergers—ExxonMobil #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth The merge of Exxon and Mobil achieved a greater economy of scale as the union resulted in increased sales within a larger geographic expansion •  This decision also allowed ExxonMobil to have a magnified presence or power within the oil industry •  The merger of Exxon and Mobil could have ended with negative results which would have threatened the value and reputation of the newly established organization •  A merger such as this could conclude with a bad public reaction causing the organization to lose their customer base •  Many times the public shows loyalty with the organization, product, and service they choose associate themselves with •  When the organization is altered due to a merge or acquisition, the public can then correlate this act with a change and feel the organization they dealt with initially has altered in some way Going-in Concerns
  20. 20. 20Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Horizontal Mergers—Microsoft & Skype #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth Microsoft purchased Skype for $8.5 billion on May 10, 2011. Skype was already synonymous with consumer video chatting when Microsoft scooped it up in the largest acquisition in company history •  Microsoft integrated Skype into its Xbox platform, ditched Windows Live Messenger for Skype's messaging offering, and spread the service across smartphone operating systems •  Acquiring Skype had a strategic – and competitive – benefit. It put Microsoft into the middle of communication between people, unobtrusively •  Skype's market share in international calls grew from 13% to 34% since the Microsoft acquisition, and its number of simultaneous users grew from 27 million to more than 50 million in roughly the same time frame •  Skype’s 2013 sales are expected to hit $2 billion, up from $800 million two years ago Source: www.engadget.com
  21. 21. 21Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Horizontal Mergers—InBev & Anheuser Busch #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth In 2008 Anheuser-Busch Cos. agreed to be acquired by Belgian brewer InBev, creating the world’s largest brewer, in a $52 billion deal •  InBev’s management quickly instituted strict cost-saving initiatives, divested non-core assets and looked for other ways to pare back expenses in Anheuser-Busch’s operations •  Once acquired, management has been able to integrate these businesses, while still achieving various synergies and increasing economies of scale •  The company has expanded profit margins, while bolstering its cash flows over time - the 2010 annual dividend of $0.50 more than tripled to $1.56 in 2012 in addition to a double digit EBITDA growth rate and almost 30% growth in earnings per share •  AB InBev remains the largest brewer in the U.S., with its market share accounting for close to half of all beer sales Source: www.tutor2u.net
  22. 22. 22Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic A pure conglomerate merger is one where the merging companies are doing businesses that are totally unrelated to each other 6) Conglomerates #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Conglomerates gained popularity in the 1960s as companies that generally engaged in one line of business began diversifying their business models through leveraged buyouts and mergers and acquisitions In mixed conglomerate mergers, the companies that are merging are doing so to gain access to a wider market and client base Mixed Pure
  23. 23. 23Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 6) Conglomerates—ITT #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth The original International Telephone & Telegraph was created in 1920 building the first interconnected telephone lines and grew quickly, through strategic acquisitions, to a major international telecom provider •  From 1960 to 1977 ITT acquired more than 350 companies — at one time securing deals at the rate of one acquisition per week •  The portfolio included well-known businesses such as Sheraton hotels, Avis Rent-a-Car, Hartford Insurance and Continental Baking •  ITT grew from a medium-sized business with $760 million in sales to a global corporation with $17 billion in sales •  From 1979 to 1995 continuous restructuring, through strategic divestures and acquisitions, resulted in more manageable segments •  In 2011, ITT split into 3 independent publicly traded companies: -  Water-related businesses to be spun off as a standalone water technology company -  Defense segment to be spun off as a standalone, diversified defense technology and information solutions company -  ITT Corporation to continue as a standalone, highly engineered industrial company Source: www.itt.com
  24. 24. 24Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 6) Conglomerate—The Rise and Fall #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Conglomerates gained popularity in the 1960s as companies that generally engaged in one line of business began diversifying their business models through leveraged buyouts and mergers and acquisitions •  The value placed on diversification during the 1960s and 1970s led to the establishment of new multinational conglomerate entities •  The most recognized theory for the rise in conglomerate merger activity during the 1960s and 1970s was that the merger wave was a response to government antitrust action against a number of large vertical and horizontal mergers •  While the ‘60s were a move to unrelated diversification, the 80’s moved to consolidation, specialization and “hostile takeovers” in response to the the 60s diversification, which produced inefficient conglomerates and entrenched managers •  The current trends toward corporate focus reverse the diversification trend of the late 1960s and early 1970s •  Conglomerate mergers have been relatively rare since many unsuccessful deals were dismantled in the 1980s •  Newer ideas have emerged focusing on a company’s core competency, sticking to what it’s good at rather than trying to create and manage diverse businesses
  25. 25. 25Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic M&A Activity Likely To Pick Up Soon #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! However, many experts predict that M&A activity will increase in the coming years, driven by a number of interrelated factors •  A Bain & Company worldwide research analysis of 1,600 public companies and 18,000 deals from 2000 through 2010 concluded that M&A activity should pick up again soon •  The slowdown in M&A since 2007 was triggered by the financial crisis, and will reverse itself as the world economy recovers •  Pent-up demand since the financial crisis is a prime reason for this conclusion •  Additionally, the surplus of cash accumulated over the past few years "will turbocharge the deal-making renaissance” to meet investors’ expectations The Case for Increased M&A Activity: Source: Bain & Company, CFOs to Focus More on Inorganic Growth
  26. 26. 26Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Landscape for Increased M&A #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! In general, there are several factors that make the commercial and economic environments ripe for M&A Favorable Conditions for M&A Activity: •  Low interest rates have put financial executives on the hunt for higher returns •  Although many companies’ wallets are fat, organic growth alone won’t be sufficient to generate the returns expected by investors •  The report estimates that about $300 trillion in global financial holdings is available for investment. Therefore, chief financial officers should use the money they have to hand and focus more on inorganic growth •  M&A can help you enter new markets and product lines, find new customers and develop new capabilities, which translates into both higher earnings and growth •  However, the report cautions acquisitions are not suitable for every business model. If core business is weak, the study shows M&A will not help •  Therefore, companies should follow a “balanced strategy that successfully combines full potential organic growth with well-conceived and executed acquisitions” Source: Bain & Company, CFOs to Focus More on Inorganic Growth
  27. 27. 27Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Content ! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy ! Session #2—Conducting a Current State Assessment ! Session #3—Articulating a Business Growth Vision ! Session #4—Driving Organic Growth ! Session #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Session #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Session #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Session #8—Measuring and Tracking
  28. 28. 28Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Developing a Business Growth Strategy #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy “The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.” —Michael Porter
  29. 29. 29Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Developing a Business Growth Strategy—Components #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Following is a high-level process for combining content from the previous sessions in pursuit of developing a comprehensive business growth strategy Determine Risk/Reward Position Create Business Case Articulate Value Proposition Explore Growth Scenarios Conduct Market Research
  30. 30. 30Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 1) Determine Risk/Reward Position #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! A critical first step in the business growth strategy development process is to determine your company’s risk/reward position Source: Ivey Business Journal
  31. 31. 31Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Growth scenarios are rich, data-driven stories about tomorrow that can help you make better decisions today Source: Monitor, Global Business Network
  32. 32. 32Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Overview #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Scenario planning can be a very powerful technique in helping explore, evaluate and ultimately craft a business growth strategy Source: Monitor, Global Business Network Scenario Planning—Key Concepts & Definitions
  33. 33. 33Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Process #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy Orient Explore Synthesize Act Monitor Interviews & Focal Issues Predetermineds & Uncertainties Scenario Framework & Scenarios Implications & Options Early Indicators & Monitoring System Growth Scenarios ! Below is a simple process for identifying and exploring business growth scenarios Source: Monitor, Global Business Network
  34. 34. 34Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Options #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! The following represent some of the more commonly used techniques for exploring and validating business growth opportunities Strategy Decision Trees Business Simulations War Gaming
  35. 35. 35Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Strategy Decision Trees #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! A decision tree is a decision support tool that uses a tree-like graph or model of decisions and their possible outcomes—including chance event outcomes, resource costs, and utility—to help identify a strategy most likely to reach a goal
  36. 36. 36Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios—Business Simulations #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Business strategy simulation games simulate real-world events using algorithms, as well as the close tying of players' actions to expected or plausible consequences and outcomes Source: www.simventure.co.uk
  37. 37. 37Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Explore Growth Scenarios—War Gaming #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Business war games are strategy games that “role play” various strategic alternatives to help determine the optimal strategic direction to pursue Source: Kappa West
  38. 38. 38Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Conduct Market Research—Overview #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy Primary Secondary Qualitative Quantitative
  39. 39. 39Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Conduct Market Research—Qualitative #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy What Is It’s Purpose? What Is It Used For? Types & Techniques •  To understand the subconscious patterns that lead people to different decisions •  To identify the scope of projects to research the views, opinions and attitudes of target groups •  To explore in depth how consumers reach a decision in the buying process •  To establish hypotheses to be tested through quantitative research •  Competitive Intelligence •  Market Access •  Market Assessment •  Pricing •  New Product Development •  Concept Testing •  Message Development •  Name, Trademark & Logo Testing •  Product/Brand Positioning •  Focus Groups •  In-depth Interviews (IDIs) •  Dyads/Triads •  Ethnography •  Observation •  Shop-along •  Diaries/Journals •  Role Play •  Elicitation & Projection Techniques •  Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP)
  40. 40. 40Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Conduct Market Research—Quantitative #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy What Is It’s Purpose? What Is It Used For? Types & Techniques •  To produce formal, statistically valid data to support business decisions •  To measure, track, assess, and predict changes in customer attitudes, satisfaction, commitment and loyalty •  To project market size, share, penetration, and growth rates •  To segment markets, and to uncover "drivers" for product preference •  Benchmarking •  Brand equity tracking •  Competitive Intelligence •  Market Pricing •  Forecasting •  Identifying market opportunities •  Market segmentation •  Optimizing product development •  Perceptual mapping of competing products •  Predicting new product uptake •  Product positioning •  Bi-variate Analysis •  Cluster Analysis •  Conjoint Analysis •  Discreet Choice Modeling (DCM) •  Data Mining •  Factor Analysis •  Hierarchical Bayes •  Latent Class Analysis •  MaxDiff Scaling (MDS) •  Perceptual Maps •  Structural Equation Modeling (SEM)
  41. 41. 41Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Pros Cons Qualitative Research •  Allows one to explore topics in more depth and detail than quantitative research •  Is often less expensive than quantitative research, because you don't need to recruit as many participants •  Offers flexibility in location and timing because you don't need to interview a large number of people at once •  It cannot quantify, making it extremely difficult to create any type of solid statistic •  You cannot generalize your findings •  Does not allow you to use your findings as a basis for a broader audience or the public in general Quantitative Research •  Data can be collected and analyzed quickly •  Using statistically valid random samples, a survey can quickly be generalized to the entire population •  A trusted set of statistics can give confidence when making future plans •  Can also be anonymous, which is useful when dealing with sensitive topics •  It allows you to generalize your findings beyond the participant group •  Limited ability to probe answers •  People who are willing to respond may share characteristics that don't apply to the audience as a whole, creating a potential bias in the study •  Research experiments can be costly 3) Conduct Market Research—Qualitative vs. Quantitative #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Both qualitative and quantitative research can be useful in assessing and validating potential business growth opportunities
  42. 42. 42Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Conduct Market Research—Primary vs. Secondary #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Similarly, both primary and secondary research can be useful in assessing and validating potential business growth opportunities Pros Cons Primary Research •  Can aim questions directly at your research objective •  Latest information from the marketplace •  Can assess the psychology of the customer •  Expensive •  Risk of questionnaire and interviewer bias •  Research findings may only be usable if comparable back-data exists Secondary Research •  Often obtained without cost •  Good overview of a market •  Usually based on actual sale figures, or research on large samples •  Data may not be updated regularly •  Not tailored to your own needs •  Expensive to buy reports on many different marketplaces
  43. 43. 43Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Conduct Market Research—Illustrated #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Below is an example of how Discrete Choice Modeling (DCM) was used to build a fact based for selecting from potential growth opportunities
  44. 44. 44Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Conduct Market Research—Illustrated #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! The research results then fed into an Excel-based simulator that helped predict the market potential for various growth opportunities
  45. 45. 45Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 4) Create Business Case—Outline #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy Strategic Context Analysis & Recommendation Viable Options Justification & Recommendation Management & Capacity Strategic Environment •  Org. Overview •  Business Need •  Change Drivers •  Bus. Outcomes Strategic Fit Business Need •  Problem/ Opportunity •  Prioritized Requirements •  Assumptions •  Constraints •  Dependencies Scope •  Boundaries •  Stakeholder Analysis Evaluation Criteria Possible Options Status Quo Option Descriptions Screening of Options Rationale for Options Alignment •  Strategic Alignment •  Bus. Need Alignment Costs Cost-Benefit Analysis Implementation Considerations •  Procurement •  Schedule/Approach •  Impact •  Capacity Risk •  Option Summary •  Risk Register Benchmark Policy & Standards Pros/Cons/ Comparison Summary Preferred Option •  Recommendation •  Deciding Factors •  Costs •  Risks •  Implementation Plan Justification & Recommendation Summary Governance & Oversight Project Mgmt. Strategy •  Project Review Strategy Outcome Mgmt. Strategy Risk Mgmt. Strategy Change Mgmt. Strategy Performance Mgmt. Strategy Source: Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada
  46. 46. 46Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 4) Create Business Case—Multiple Methodologies #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! There are several different financial approaches that can be employed in developing a business case, including: Cash Flow •  Free cash flow is the cash a business generates to re-invest in the business, pursue new opportunities, pay employees and pay investors Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) •  DCF is what someone is willing to pay today in order to receive an anticipated cash flow in future years. To value an investment, we “discount” future cash flows at an interest rate that reflects the perceived riskiness of the cash flows •  The discount rate reflects both the time value of money and the risk premium investors demand to compensate for the risk that expected cash flows may not materialize Cost of Capital •  There are multiple ways to evaluate the returns from investment, including IRR, NPV, Payback Period, EVA, Real Option Value, etc. •  To prioritize, companies often use a hurdle rate that is higher than the cost of capital
  47. 47. 47Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Articulate Value Proposition #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! When it comes to defining a business growth strategy, value proposition is perhaps one of the most misunderstood and commonly misused terms What it is NOT •  A new name •  A unique selling point •  Another word for “product” or “service” or “offering” •  A corporate positioning statement •  An elevator pitch •  A communication message •  A list of benefits What it IS
  48. 48. 48Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Articulate Value Proposition—Template #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Consistent with the definition on the previous page, below is a framework that can be used to develop a value proposition for a new business growth opportunity 1 Market 2 Value Experience 3 Offerings 6 Proof 5 Differentiation 4 Benefits The specific group of customers you are targeting Benefits minus costs, as perceived by the customer The product/service mix you are selling How your offering delivers clear customer value How you are different from and better than alternatives Substantiated credibility and believability of your offering Value Proposition Source: Greener Consulting
  49. 49. 49Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Articulate Value Proposition—Alternate Model #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Another popular framework/model for value proposition is one put forward by Kevin Lane Keller of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth University Points of Preference Points of Difference Points of Entry EE. Provides best overall value C. Continuously innovates N. Leading co. that provides environ- friendly chemicals U. Provides self- service tools & support W. Provides training for your employees F. Products tailored to industry M. Offers products that use less water, energy, labor 0.32 0.300.29 0.350.36 0.31 0.35 0.37 0.34 0.31 S. Makes buying process easier thru simplified prod. range
  50. 50. 50Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 5) Articulate Value Proposition—Disguised Example #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy Understanding & Industry Expertise BB. Gets to know your business DD. Provides deep application expertise thru its dist partners Leveraging our in-depth understanding of your business and our industry-leading expertise, we collaborate with you to innovate and develop the right solutions that deliver superior performance Collaboration V. Sales team recommends best for you W. Provides training for your employees Superior Performance H. Better cleaning results thru integrated chem, serv, equip EE. Provides best overall value D. Enhances results thru tools & accessories Innovate Right Solutions C. Continuously innovates I. Offers products to differentiate your business F. Products tailored to industry U. Provides self-service tools & support Points of Difference Points of Entry Channel Partnerships CC. Has strong distribution partners AA. Distributors recommend Green Offerings N. Leading co. that provides environ-friendly chemicals M. Offers products that use less water, energy, labor Simplicity T. Makes it easier to purchase chems, serv, equip from one source S. Makes buying process easier thru simplified product range E. Provides dosing and dispensing Compliance / Risk Mitigation Q. Reduces liability risks O. Provides expertise for compliance Point of Preference
  51. 51. 51Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Practical Exercise #3—Building a Value Proposition #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy For an existing business/product/service within your organization, how would you articulate the following components of a value proposition? ! What is the Market the business/product/service currently serves ! How would you characterize the Value Experience the business/product/service provides to the Market? ! How would you describe the specific/tangible Offering(s) for the business/product/service? ! What specific End Benefits do your customers derive as a result of the business/product/ service? ! In what ways is your business/product/service Differentiated vis-à-vis the competitive set? How sustainable is this source of competitive differentiation? ! What are some tangible “Proof Points” that lend credibility to the Benefit provided and/or the source of Differentiation?
  52. 52. 52Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Content ! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy ! Session #2—Conducting a Current State Assessment ! Session #3—Articulating a Business Growth Vision ! Session #4—Driving Organic Growth ! Session #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Session #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Session #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Session #8—Measuring and Tracking
  53. 53. 53Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Organizational Readiness & Implementation #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation “Success is readiness for instant action when the opportune moment arrives.” —Newell D. Hillis
  54. 54. 54Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Organizational Readiness—Frame of Reference #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Organizational readiness is a critical link in the business growth strategy chain. Without it, even the greatest strategic plan will fail Current State Assessment Articulating a Business Growth Vision Driving Organic Growth Pursuing Inorganic Growth Developing a Business Growth Strategy Organizational Readiness & Implementation Measurement & Tracking
  55. 55. 55Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Make Changes to Structure Building Blocks of an Implementation Program #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! There are four building blocks executives can use to ensure strategy and execution are inextricably linked 1 2 3 4 Clarify Decision Rights Design Information Flows Continually Monitor the Plan
  56. 56. 56Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Management Selection & Development Corporate Culture Leadership Style Organizational Structure Information Systems Incentive Systems Organization Processes Strategic Planning Systems Control Systems 1) Make Changes to Structure ! As always, organizational and functional structure must be aligned and consistent with the business growth strategy—or any business strategy for that matter Source: Harvard Business Review, The Secrets to Successful Strategy Execution #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation
  57. 57. 57Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 2) Clarify Decision Rights #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Research shows that actions having to do with decision rights and information are twice as effective as improvements made to the other two building blocks, emphasizing the critical importance of organizational structure Source: Strategy Formulation & Implementation, Richard Daft
  58. 58. 58Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 3) Design Information Flows #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Above all else, the business must communicate strategy clearly and regularly to employees. When the CEO and top management demonstrate the link between business strategy and specific business decisions, front-line staff are encouraged to think strategically too
  59. 59. 59Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic 4) Monitor the Plan •  Challenge underlying assumptions •  Create a champion for every strategy and action •  Stay committed •  Conduct short-term strategy reviews •  Expand skills •  Target sales •  Set strategic plan milestones #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Review progress on a monthly or quarterly basis, depending on the level of activity and time frame of the strategic plan Guiding Principles:
  60. 60. 60Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Performance Gaps •  Where are we now? •  Where do we want to be? •  How will we get there? •  When will we get there? #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! There are four important and frequent questions a business should ask itself as it prepares to implement a strategy Source: www.learnmarketing.net
  61. 61. 61Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Performance Gap Closure—OGSM #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! The OGSM process forces a company to clearly define its objectives, identify key strategies and initiatives, and assign accountabilities and deadlines Objectives Goals Strategies Measures Description Long term, broad statements outlining a desired state Usually to be accomplished over the next 2-3 years Quantitative targets of the objectives with respective timeframes Usually include overall factors : ! Share ! Revenue ! Profit Structured approaches to pursue the objectives Strategies force choice among competing key priorities and focus areas to build the competitive advantage necessary to achieve desired goals. Numerical evaluations indicating progress towards milestones, goals, and objectives Questions Addressed What do we want to achieve as a company and/or business unit / region? What specific targets should be delivered? Answers typically include targets: ! Share ! Revenue ! Profit How will we achieve our goals and objectives? What will be done? How will resources – people, capital, and dollars – be invested? How is the business performing? How will we know if our strategies are effective in pursuing our goals and objectives? Nature of Component QUALITATIVE QUANTITATIVE QUALITATIVE QUANTITATIVE
  62. 62. 62Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic OGSM—Disguised Example (Partial) #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation Strategy Initiatives Metric Function(s) Impacted SPA Timeline Status S1: Enable distributor and other channel partners to succeed I1: Offer end-user training tools for distributors to utilize in on-site customer visits M1: Develop questionnaire to regularly measure effectiveness of training by QX 200X M1: Conduct XX number of forums with distributor sales reps to develop or refine training tools ! Marketing ! Sales ! SSE I2: Provide marketing materials to enhance distributor rep selling capabilities M1: Conduct XX number of training sessions with distributor reps by QX 200X ! Marketing ! Sales ! SSE S2: Offer alternative points of access to meet varied channel needs I1: Develop online forum to provide application tips, Q&A support, and other easy to navigate informational materials M1: Develop/enhance IT infrastructure to support online interactions, e.g.. information sharing, customer support, ordering, etc. by QX 200X M2: Drive website traffic and measure unique site visits with goal to increase by XX% annually ! IT OBJECTIVE: O7 Channel partnerships - Leverage strong distributor relationships to ensure timely and adequate delivery of products and solutions GOAL: ! Increase distributor satisfaction ratings by XX% ! Achieve annual improvement of X points up to a 4 out of 5 score on customer survey for “Likelihood to recommend JD products” ! The example below demonstrates the breadth and level of specificity that can and should go into an OGSM effort
  63. 63. 63Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Potential Options to Improve Strategy-Execution Capabilities Establish individual performance measures Improve field-to-headquarters information flow Define and distribute operating metrics to the field Clarify and streamline decision making at each operating level Focus corporate staff on supporting business unit decision making Create cross-functional teams Broaden spans of control Institute lateral moves and rotations Assign process owners to manage activities spanning functions Introduce differentiating performance awards Focus headquarters on important strategic questions #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation Source: Harvard Business Review, The Secrets to Successful Strategy Execution
  64. 64. 64Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation •  Inability to “just say no” •  Lack of communication •  Losing sight of the big picture •  "Bolt-on" syndrome •  Continuing “business as usual” •  Wimping out •  Using the wrong scoreboard •  No yardstick •  The be-all and end-all •  Confusing terminology and language ! Strategic planning entails risks. The goal is not to allow current operating problems to dictate or deter long-range strategic planning. Common implementation mistakes include: Avoid Common Strategic Plan Implementation Mistakes Source: www.mondaq.com
  65. 65. 65Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic How Do You Know When You’ve Nailed It? •  Everyone has a solid understanding of the decisions and actions for which he or she is responsible •  Important information about the competitive environment gets to headquarters quickly •  Once made, decisions are rarely second-guessed •  Information flows freely across organizational boundaries •  Field and line employees have the information they need to understand the bottom- line impact of their day-to-day choices #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation Key Tenets of Successful Implementation:
  66. 66. 66Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Royal Mail—Communication Is Vital In Delivering Change #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation UK’s Royal Mail has a clear strategic vision and a small number of focused strategic priorities, seeing parcel delivery as the main revenue/ profit growth driver whereas letter volumes are expected to decline •  Royal Mail's change management has been costly and complex, as would be expected for a business with tens of thousands of employees, deeply-entrenched working methods, culture and the need to invest heavily in automation •  A key challenge is to persuade employees to view Royal Mail as a parcels rather than letters business…a very different operating model •  “Our people are key to our transformation and, in particular, the successful delivery of our strategic priorities…..We are redoubling our efforts to communicate with our people about the challenges we face and our strategy to address them. We have provided managers with tools and support to help with action planning, allowing members of teams to feel more engaged in the business’ future. Alongside our broader engagement program, we are undertaking a series of ‘town hall’ events, where members of our senior management team will address as many as 1,000 colleagues at a time.” Source: www.tutor2u.net
  67. 67. 67Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Time Warner & AOL—What Were They Thinking? #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation In 2001, America Online merged with Time Warner in a deal valued at $350 billion. It was then, and is now, the largest merger in American business history •  In 2009, Time Warner decided to spin off AOL as its own company again, ending their ill-fated relationship now referred to as the “worst transaction in history” •  Culture clash was widely blamed for the failure •  “I remember saying…that life was going to be different going forward because they’re very different cultures, but…I underestimated how different… It was beyond certainly my abilities to figure out how to blend the old media and the new media culture” -Richard Parsons, president of Time Warner •  While they had a clear strategic vision, Time Warner and AOL failed to get buy-in from executives within the organization and divisions continued to work as disparate entities rather than a unified organization •  In a LinkedIn poll, 80% believed the merger failed due to the companies’ inability to generate the synergies expected Source: www.nytimes.com
  68. 68. 68Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Practical Exercise #4—Organizational Readiness Considerations #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation With your organization/business unit in mind—and obviously not knowing yet what your ultimate business growth strategy will be—how would you answer the following questions? ! How would you assess your organization’s leadership team in terms of its capacity for change management? (Consider factors such as its ability to articulate a vision, consistently communicate a vision, stay with a vision even when times are challenging, reinforce its commitment to a vision through establishing the right incentives, etc.) ! In what ways is your current organizational structure conducive to growth and in what ways could it potentially get in the way of growth? (Consider factors such as the size of your organization, whether reporting structures are flat or hierarchical, important business functions you may not currently have in-house, etc.) ! In what ways could your organization’s culture impact business growth? (Consider factors such as tenure/longevity of leaders and key managers, level of camaraderie/cohesiveness among employees, overall receptivity and openness to change, etc.) ! How effective is your organization in establishing and adhering to processes? To what extent will it be able to effectively manage the base business while it readies itself for growth?
  69. 69. 69Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Content ! Session #1—Overview of Business Growth Strategy ! Session #2—Conducting a Current State Assessment ! Session #3—Articulating a Business Growth Vision ! Session #4—Driving Organic Growth ! Session #5—Pursuing Inorganic Growth ! Session #6—Developing a Business Growth Strategy ! Session #7—Organizational Readiness & Implementation ! Session #8—Measuring and Tracking
  70. 70. 70Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics #8—Metrics & Tracking “However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.” —Winston Churchill
  71. 71. 71Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics #8—Metrics & Tracking “What gets measured, gets managed.” —Peter Drucker Management Consultant, Educator, Author
  72. 72. 72Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics—Defined #8—Metrics & Tracking ! It's important to remember that metrics are a means to an end, not an end unto themselves. Measuring a metric is not always enough—you need to use that metric to guide business decisions and to ensure your business is on the right track Purpose/Use: ! Every department in your business should be monitoring key metrics—whether that’s your sales force and marketing team or your financial aid and inventory operations. Smart organizations strengthen business metrics by combining raw values with additional insight as comparative values, anecdotal information, and objectives Examples: ! Return on Investment (ROI) ! Employee and Customer Churn Rates ! Revenues ! EBITDA Definition: Business Metric—Any type of measurement used to gauge some quantifiable component of a company's performance. A business metric is a raw measurement of a business process
  73. 73. 73Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics—Objectives #8—Metrics & Tracking ! Business metrics should be both diagnostic and prescriptive. It is not enough to provide data and information…metrics need to inform a course of action x Business Building Activities u Business Performance Metrics v Actual Business Performance w Course Corrections
  74. 74. 74Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics—Types #8—Metrics & Tracking How do customers respond to your business/ organization? Brand Awareness 7 Are customers aware of your brand (company), and is it relevant to them? How is your brand (company) perceived in the marketplace? What impact is your business having in the marketplace? Brand Funnel Brand Image Relationship/ Loyalty Business Impact 13 12 11 10 14 15 16 17 Brand Consideration 8 Behavior Metrics Perception Metrics Performance Metrics Brand Trial 9 Culture Reinforcing Market Manifestation What are you doing to reinforce desired behaviors and ideal culture? What tangible activities are being demonstrated in the market? What you do How you’re viewed What you achieve Town Hall Meetings 1 Awards & Incentives 2 Rotational Assignments 3 Articles & White Papers 4 Sponsorships & Donations 5 Proprietary Products/IP 6 18 Brand Attributes Brand Personality Organizational Associations Unit Sales/ Revenue Margin/ Profitability Market Share Customer Acquisition Customer Retention Customer Satisfaction TypesKeyQuestionExamplesCategories
  75. 75. 75Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics—KPI Dashboard #8—Metrics & Tracking ! It is often useful to weight metrics based on their importance to the business, as well as rate the company’s performance against them Importance Performance
  76. 76. 76Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics—Illustrative Dashboard #8—Metrics & Tracking ! Below is a business metrics dashboard for a major U.S.-based international airline Strategy Dashboard
  77. 77. 77Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Business Metrics—Guiding Principles #8—Metrics & Tracking ! The following represents a list of guidelines to keep in mind when developing a business metrics system and dashboard •  Measure before you manage •  Choose the right metrics •  Avoid common metrics pitfalls •  Invest in tools that deliver real-time feedback •  Share metrics with employees •  Remember that accountability starts at the top •  Continually question, reevaluate, and refine Business Metrics Guiding Principles:
  78. 78. 78Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Practical Exercise #5—Identifying Business Growth Metrics #8—Metrics & Tracking As you consider future growth opportunities for your business, what types of metrics do you think it would be beneficial to track to ensure you achieve performance goals? ! Behavior Metrics •  Culture Reinforcing—What desired behaviors would you envision tracking to achieve the “ideal culture?” •  Market Manifestation—What tangible activities could you track that would demonstrate your commitment to the external market? ! Perception Metrics •  Brand Funnel—What “funnel” metrics would be important for your organization to track (e.g., awareness, purchase intent, repurchase, loyalty)? •  Brand Image—What image-related attributes would be important for your organization to track (e.g., quality, convenience, efficiency, price/value, premium, dependability)? ! Performance Metrics •  Relationship/Loyalty—What customer relationship/loyalty metrics would be important for your organization to track? •  Business Impact—What business impact metrics would be important for your organization to track (e.g., revenue, profit, margin, market share)?
  79. 79. Proprietary and Confidential UNI Strategic Contact Information Mitch Duckler Managing Partner FullSurge +1 (312) 239-8985 mduckler@fullsurge.com

×