Cognitive Systems Institute Group Speaker Series - Virtual Reality, Game Design, and the Future of Education

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Virtual Reality, Game Design, and the Future of Education

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Cognitive Systems Institute Group Speaker Series - Virtual Reality, Game Design, and the Future of Education

  1. 1. Virtual Reality, Game Design, and the Future of Education Aldis Sipolins Head of Virtual Reality and Game Design IBM Research: Education and Cognitive Sciences
  2. 2. My Background
  3. 3. The Holodeck Project
  4. 4. VR Brain Training Startup
  5. 5. What Is Virtual Reality?
  6. 6. Binocular Disparity
  7. 7. Binocular Disparity
  8. 8. Presence & Transfer
  9. 9. Learning in Virtual Reality Presence - Ecologically valid responses - Makes learning engaging
 Transfer - True goal of learning - Near vs. far transfer
 Physical Activity - Room-scale tracking allows for mild exercise - Elevated heart rate enhances learning
  10. 10. "It works. Nobody’s getting sick off this… And you don’t have to teach them anything except the most basic interactions, because our brains know all about three dimensional space. It’s startling and perhaps insulting what we’ve tolerated as interaction models until now.” Tycho Brahe (Jerry Holkins), Penny Arcade
  11. 11. The Virtual Reality Market
  12. 12. Virtual Reality Is(Finally) Here Watershed moment in technology - First VR headsets hitting the market 
 Hardware is dominated by big players - Facebook, Google, HTC 
 Software/infrastructure is not - IBM in prime position with Cognitive + Cloud + Watson
  13. 13. “We believe VR devices will have multiple use cases similar to smartphones that serve the functions of voice communication, texting, email, video, internet browsing, and social platforms. In our view, consumers will be able to use a single VR device to play videogames, watch video programming and live events, and shop.” Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research
  14. 14. VR/AR Investment 00 00 00 00 00 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Q1 2016 $542m $2,100m $307m $692m $250m$223m$102m$26m Oculus (Facebook) Magic Leap (Google) Source: Pitchbook Virtual Reality Analyst Report
  15. 15. 0 m 100 m 200 m 300 m 400 m 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Projected User Base Source: IDC Worldwide Augmented and Virtual Reality Hardware Forecast 315 million 95 million 200k 9.6 million
  16. 16. Hardware Revenue(2025) Source: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research 0 75 150 225 300 0 200 400 600 800 $14b $62b $111b $99b$63b $110b Average Sale Price ($) AnnualShipments(millions) Game Consoles Desktops Laptops TelevisionsTablets VR/AR
  17. 17. Projected Revenue Hardware 55% Software 45% Source: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research
  18. 18. Software Revenue (2025) Videogames $23.9b Media $15.0b Real Estate $5.3b Education $1.4b Engineering $9.7b Retail $3.3b Healthcare $10.5b Military $2.9b Source: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research
  19. 19. Virtual vs. Augmented Reality AR 25% VR 75% “At this stage, we have greater conviction in the relative success of VR versus AR given VR’s technological progress and momentum, and the early formation of an ecosystem of vendors and partners” Source: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research
  20. 20. Virtual Reality and Youth 47% know “a lot” about VR 75% will ask parents for VR device 88% said VR is “very cool” Source: The New Reality of Virtual Reality and the Potential With Youth
  21. 21. Cognitive Is The Future of VR VR generates massive amount of user data - What users do (accuracy, reaction time) - Where users are (3D position + rotation) - How users interact (motion controller gestures) 
 More data sources on the horizon - Wearables (heart rate, respiration) - Vision tracking - Brain imaging (EEG sensors) 
 Cognitive makes this data meaningful - Predict performance - Suggest content
  22. 22. Hardware
  23. 23. Oculus Rift Samsung GearVR HTC Vive Mobile VR High-End VR Google Cardboard
  24. 24. Google Cardboard - - Cheap - Works with any smartphone - Tons of content - Display quality - No position tracking - One-button input +
  25. 25. Samsung GearVR - - Wireless - Resolution (2560 x 1440) - Headset cost ($100) - No position tracking (for now) - Specific phones - Phone cost ($800) +
  26. 26. Oculus Rift - - Resolution (2160 x 1200) - Refresh Rate (90 Hz) - Touch controllers (Q4 2016) - Hardware requirements - Tracking range - Cost ($600) +
  27. 27. Oculus Touch Controllers
  28. 28. HTC Vive - - Room-scale tracking (15’ x 15’) - Resolution (2160 x 1200) - Refresh Rate (90 Hz) - Space requirements - Hardware requirements - Cost ($800) +
  29. 29. Vive Inside-Out Tracking
  30. 30. Vive Motion Controllers
  31. 31. Which Is Better?
  32. 32. "It's going to change the world. The hardware is going to double in quality every few years for another decade, to the point where, 10 years from now, it's going to be hard to tell the difference between virtual reality and the real world.” Tim Sweeney, founder of Epic Games
  33. 33. Motion Sickness
  34. 34. “It’s no longer the hardware’s fault anymore. It’s the developer’s choices that are making you sick.” Chet Faliszek, Valve
  35. 35. Additional Slides
  36. 36. Virtual Reality & Education
  37. 37. Huge Potential - Immersive, engaging lessons - 3D concepts taught in 3D
 Physical Activity - Enhances performance and learning - Lifelong brain health - Helps autism, ADHD, obesity/diabetes
 A New Frontier - Education & VR is unexplored territory Virtual Reality & Education vs.
  38. 38. Challenges Outcome variables - Paper & pencil tests - Real-world outcomes (transfer)
 Cultural stigma - VR is isolating & passive - VR is social & active 
 Age restrictions - 13+ for now
  39. 39. “…adults are going to be too embarrassed to run around outside chasing after some invisible phantom. But a nine-year-old running around the yard, playing kickball with Pikachu? Like, oh my God. Kids are going to love this thing so much.” Jesse Schell, Schell Games
  40. 40. Education & Game Design
  41. 41. “[A good game is] one that teaches everything it has to offer before the player stops playing. That’s what games are, in the end. Teachers. Fun is just another word for learning.” Ralph Koster, A Theory of Fun
  42. 42. Education & Game Design Why games? - Fundamental human desire for fun - Learning is hard-wired to be fun 
 Skill Acquisition - Instruction, exploration, integration - Variable Priority Training 
 Positive Reinforcement - Make every interaction rewarding - Utterly intuitive user experience design
  43. 43. “Good design is good business” Thomas J. Watson
  44. 44. The Virtual Classroom
  45. 45. "...since the buildings were just pieces of software, their design wasn't limited by monetary constraints, or even by the laws of physics. So, every school was a grand palace of learning, with polished marble hallways, cathedral-like classrooms, zero-g gymnasiums [way cool!], and virtual libraries containing every (school-board approved) book ever written” Ernest Cline, Ready Player One
  46. 46. The Virtual Classroom Watson Is The Teacher - Explains lessons - Answers questions - Suggests content 
 Learner Models - Accuracy, reaction time - Heart rate, breathing, EEG… - Personality & preferences 
 Adaptive Social Learning - Collaborative lessons - Real-time changes to optimize learning
  47. 47. Binocular Disparity
  48. 48. Thank You!
  49. 49. Go Make Stuff!

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