Tech training workshop 3 final 090810

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Tech training workshop 3 final 090810

  1. 1. <ul><li>Applying Excel: Making It Work for You </li></ul><ul><li>September 8, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>On Today’s Agenda: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Excel Basics Recap & Printing How-to </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Excel Formulas: Presentation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Formula Break-out Sessions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A look at Excel Charts: Short Guided Exercise </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Merging Excel Data: How and Why </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pearl and Excel Essentials </li></ul></ul></ul>
  2. 2. <ul><li>Welcome! </li></ul><ul><li>Your Training Organizers : </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Matthew Jackson | x8686 | [email_address] </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Karen Helmerson | x3003 | [email_address] </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sheri Signer | x5656 | sheri.signer@gmail.com </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Getting Started with Excel </li></ul><ul><li>Best Practices to Consider - Planning Ahead </li></ul><ul><li>What is the purpose of my data?  Does it have to be in Excel? </li></ul><ul><li>Am I making an organized table, computing figures or creating a chart? </li></ul><ul><li>Will this be used by other people?  Will they use the information differently? </li></ul><ul><li>Will the data need to be exported into another program? </li></ul><ul><li>Do I have all of the information I need to start my chart? </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Getting Started with Excel </li></ul><ul><li>Best Practices to Consider - Preparing Your Layout </li></ul><ul><li>Based on current data, decide how many rows and columns you will need </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare your View to accommodate your comfort </li></ul><ul><li>Create the necessary borders around your cells and chart </li></ul><ul><li>Decide what information needs to be separated into cells to create the appropriate charts and to reorder data if necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Create a color scheme to highlight or separate information for readability </li></ul><ul><li>Title Column or Rows to help organize information </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Getting Started with Excel </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing your way around </li></ul><ul><li>The first step in understanding Excel is feeling comfortable with the basic components of an Excel file, or “Workbook”: </li></ul><ul><li>Sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Row </li></ul><ul><li>Column </li></ul><ul><li>Active Cell </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Getting Started with Excel </li></ul><ul><li>Do this! Create a simple shopping list. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a New Workbook </li></ul><ul><li>Create Headers for your item and the item’s price. </li></ul><ul><li>Format the column for the items’ prices </li></ul><ul><li>Come up with a total for your shopping trip using AutoSum </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Getting Started with Excel </li></ul><ul><li>Do this! Try your hand at the following… </li></ul><ul><li>Insert a new row for something you forgot </li></ul><ul><li>Insert a new column to add a new category for your list </li></ul><ul><li>Sort your list by category </li></ul><ul><li>Clean up the look of your spreadsheet using Borders and Shading </li></ul><ul><li>Get your list ready to print </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Printing </li></ul><ul><li>A Few Steps to Know </li></ul><ul><li>Excel is generally not designed to produce documents for printing. For text-heavy reports that use Excel data, a better option may be to use a Mail Merge , or provide a Chart (both covered later). </li></ul><ul><li>But, sometimes you just want to print the data… </li></ul><ul><li>You’ll need to know how to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hide and Unhide rows and Columns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set the “print area” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fit your work to a single page </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Printing </li></ul><ul><li>Hide & Unhide </li></ul><ul><li>First, select the row(s) or column(s) that you wish to hide or unhide. Choose Format > Row from the menu bar, and then choose either Hide or Unhide . Or, simply right-click to and choose Hide or Unhide . </li></ul>Choosing from the menu bar ( Format> Row ) Choosing from the right-click menu.
  10. 10. <ul><li>Printing </li></ul><ul><li>Setting the Print Area </li></ul><ul><li>By default, Excel prints the entire worksheet. One way to stop this is to set a print area, which specifies the exact range of cells to print. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Printing </li></ul><ul><li>Setting the Print Area </li></ul><ul><li>To set a print area : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select the group of cells you want included in the print range by dragging your mouse. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose File> Print Area> Set Print Area from the menu bar. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose File> Print Preview from the menu to check that the print area is set correctly. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To remove a print area : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose File> Print Area> Clear Print Area from the menu bar. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose File> Print Preview from the menu to check that the print area has been cleared. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Printing </li></ul><ul><li>Formatting for a Single Page </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose File> Page Setup from the menu bar. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select the “Page” tab. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the button that says “Fit To”. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set “Fit To” to one (1) page “Wide”. Leave the setting for “Tall” blank. Click OK. </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>The Main Attraction </li></ul>The power of Excel to perform complex calculations has made it one of the most ubiquitous software on the market. It is used in industries ranging from Advertising to Investment Banking to the Nonprofit sector. Excel formulas combine elements of database, statistical, and accounting software into a single feature.
  14. 14. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>How Do Formulas Work? </li></ul>Excel Formulas, or Functions, are short lines of computer code that tell Excel to perform a calculation. Most Excel Formulas are designed to do a mathematical calculation, but formulas can accomplish other tasks as well. Formulas are entered into a single cell on an Excel spreadsheet. The expression that you enter tells Excel how to manipulate some other combination of cells. The results of that calculation are displayed in the same cell in which the formula was entered.
  15. 15. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>Syntax </li></ul>All formulas begin with the “equals” symbol ( = ). Built-in functions are also available through Excel. These built-in formulas are indicated by a keyword in capital letters that directly follows the = (e.g., =SUM(A1:A4), =AVERAGE(A1:A4), etc.) .
  16. 16. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>Syntax – Basic Math </li></ul>NOTE : Symbols must be typed exactly as shown. =2+2 Cell will display “4” =B2-B4 Cell will display the cell B2 minus the cell B4 (e.g., if B2=5 and B4=2, =B2-B4 will show “3” =C4*D3 Cell will display the cell C4 multiplied (x) by cell D3 (e.g., if C4=3 and D3=5, =C4*D3 will show “15”) =H2/B2 Cell will display the cell H2 divided (÷) by the cell B2 (e.g., if H2=20 and B2=5, =H2/B2 will show “4”) =SUM(A1:A4) Cell will display the sum of cells in the sequence of A1 through A4 (e.g. =SUM(A1:A4) will show the results of A1+A2+A3+A4)
  17. 17. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>The Formula Bar </li></ul>If you click on a cell that contains a formula, you can view and/or edit the formula by clicking on the formula bar.
  18. 18. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>Applying Formulas </li></ul>Once you have crafted a formula, Excel can copy that formula and automatically make changes as needed when the formula is pasted . This allows you to apply a formula to large numbers of cells without needing to re-type the formula each time. By default, all cell names (e.g., “B6”) in Excel formulas are relative , meaning that the formula variables will be adjusted automatically as the formula is applied in new cells. For example, if “=SUM(A1:A5)” exists in cell A1, copying it and pasting it into cell B1 will produce the formula “=SUM(B1:B5)”
  19. 19. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>The Fill Handle </li></ul>Excel uses a special cursor called the Fill Handle to apply formulas.
  20. 20. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>Built-in Functions </li></ul>Excel contains hundreds of built-in functions and formulas. You can insert a built-in formula or function into a cell by clicking Insert > Function from the menu bar, or by clicking the f x icon on the formula bar. NOTE : Each of these built-in functions has a specific, distinct syntax. Excel provides the proper syntax as you insert the function.
  21. 21. <ul><li>Excel Formulas </li></ul><ul><li>Built-in Functions Commonly Used at NYSCA </li></ul>SUM Calculates the sum of the numbers in a specified range AVERAGE Calculates the average of the numbers in a specified range SUBTOTAL Inserts a subtotal that adjusts automatically when using advanced features; can use math operations other than SUM.
  22. 22. <ul><li>A Closer Look at Excel Charts </li></ul><ul><li>Is it all that hard? </li></ul>
  23. 23. Excel Charts – Working Together Part 1 - Launch Excel : If Excel is already open on your workstation, open a new Excel workbook. There are three ways: 1. Go to the Standard toolbar. Click on the New Workbook button. 2. Go to the File menu. Select New . 3. Use a keyboard combination: Ctrl + N
  24. 24. Part 2 - Enter the data to be graphed : For the purpose of this lesson you will use data from FY Budgets. Enter it as you see below:
  25. 25. <ul><li>Part 3 - Highlight data to be graphed: </li></ul><ul><li>Include the row with heading titles, the years, and budget numbers. Put your cursor in cell A1, click and hold the mouse button down and drag to the farthest corner of data. Highlighted data should look like the image below: </li></ul><ul><li>Note: Cell A1 is selected, the select color extends around the cell </li></ul>
  26. 26. Part 4 - Select the Chart Wizard: That is done by going to the Insert menu and selecting Chart . You can also click on the Chart Wizard button on the Standard toolbar.
  27. 27. Part 5 – Choose a Chart Type : From the Chart Wizard box that opens select Chart type. For this activity, a column graph works best.
  28. 28. Part 6 – Preview Your Chart : After you have selected the Chart type, click and hold your mouse pointer down on the Press and Hold... button to see what your data looks like in the chart type you selected. If you do not like the look, select another chart type. After you have selected the chart type you will have two options: Select Next and let Chart Wizard show you a series of options to make changes to your chart.
  29. 29. Part 7 – Format Your Chart : The second step taken by Chart Wizard is to verify the range of data being used for the chart. We will click on the series tab to revise our data. Here, we need to revise the series by removing Fiscal Year and instead placing it as the (X) axis labels.
  30. 30. Part 8 – Editing the Data Range : After clicking on the box to choose your (X) Axis labels, it will shrink to look like the box below, allowing you to view the entire spreadsheet. You can edit the data range in this small window. When you are finished, click the same box at the end to restore the window. At this time you will highlight the years from 2000-2011. This will automatically compute in the chart wizard.
  31. 32. Part 9 – Insert A Chart : For the final step, Excel will ask if you would like to insert the chart as a new sheet within your workbook or as an object on the spreadsheet you created the form from.
  32. 33. . Select Next to move to the final dialog box which allows you to see the chart as a new sheet or place it on one of the sheets in your workbook. If you let the Chart Wizard finish your chart after the first dialog box, or work through each of the four steps, your chart will look something like the one below.
  33. 34. <ul><li>The previous chart showed one instance of data associated with making a chart. Charts are beneficial in comparing data as well. In the following example, we will take the same data from our previous chart and add another column of data to compare. </li></ul>
  34. 37. <ul><li>Beyond Excel: Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>What is Mail Merge? </li></ul><ul><li>A mail merge is a method of taking data from a database, spreadsheet, or other form of structured data, and inserting it into documents such as letters, mailing labels, and name tags. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It usually requires two files, one storing the variable data to be inserted (your Excel spreadsheet), and the other containing the information that will be the same for each result of the mail merge and the instructions for formatting the variable data (e.g. a Word Document). </li></ul></ul></ul>
  35. 38. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Two Essential Tasks </li></ul>Generating a report in Microsoft Word: Using a properly formatted spreadsheet, Microsoft Word can pull variable data into a report. Sending Messages to an Email List: An Excel sheet with a mailing list can be used in conjunction with Outlook and Word to make it easier to communicate.
  36. 39. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Generating a Report in Word – Part 1 </li></ul><ul><li>To Mail Merge a custom report, you will need two (2) things: </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘template’ for the report with spaces for anything that you will want to plug in as a variable. This should be designed and saved as a normal Word document. For example, a standard letter with spaces for the recipient’s name, address, and salutation. </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘data source’ to be ‘mail merged’ with the template. For example, an Excel workbook containing a mailing list. </li></ul>
  37. 40. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Generating a Report in Word – Part 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Open your template report in Word. Select Tools> Letters & Mailings> Mail Merge . A new window will open in the right of your screen. You will complete the mail merge process here. </li></ul><ul><li>From the list on the right, select the type of document you would like to create. Click “Next”. Examples in this exercise are for “Letters” . </li></ul><ul><li>From the “Select Starting Document” options, select “use the current document” and click “Next”. </li></ul>
  38. 41. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Generating a Report in Word – Part 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Under “Select Recipients”, check “Use Existing List”. Under “Use An Existing List”, click “Browse”. Using the file window, located your data source (your Excel file). You will be prompted to select the worksheet that you will be drawing data from. Click “Next” once you are finished. </li></ul><ul><li>Under “Write Your Letter”, click on “More Items”. From the list, select the fields that you would like to be inserted as variables. Note : The fields will be inserted at the location of your cursor. They can be cut and pasted later. When you’ve entered in your variables, click “Next”. </li></ul>
  39. 42. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Generating a Report in Word – Part 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Preview your letters using the menu provided. Note that each letter is a distinct item. When you are satisfied, click “complete the merge. </li></ul>
  40. 43. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Emailing a Mailing List – Part 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Open your template report in Word. Select Tools> Letters & Mailings> Mail Merge . A new window will open in the right of your screen. You will complete the mail merge process here. </li></ul><ul><li>From the list on the right, select “E-Mail Messages”. Click “Next”. </li></ul><ul><li>From the “Select Starting Document” options, select “use the current document” and click “Next”. </li></ul>
  41. 44. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Emailing a Mailing List – Part 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Under “Select Recipients”, check “Use Existing List”. Under “Use An Existing List”, click “Browse”. Using the file window, located your data source (your Excel file). You will be prompted to select the worksheet that you will be drawing data from. Click “Next” once you are finished. </li></ul><ul><li>Under “Write Your E-mail Message”, click on “More Items”. From the list, select the fields that you would like to be inserted as variables. Note : The fields will be inserted at the location of your cursor. They can be cut and pasted later. When you’ve entered in your variables, click “Next”. </li></ul>
  42. 45. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Emailing a Mailing List – Part 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Preview your letters using the menu provided. Note that each letter is a distinct item. When you are satisfied, click “complete the merge. </li></ul><ul><li>Under “Merge”, click “Electronic Mail”. From the pop-up dialogue box, select “To” to the column name (from your Excel sheet) that contains email address. Type your desired subject line. Set “Mail Format” to HTML. </li></ul><ul><li>Under “Send Records”, select your desired option. Click “OK” to begin the emailing. </li></ul>
  43. 46. <ul><li>Mail Merges </li></ul><ul><li>Emailing a Mailing List – A Word of Caution </li></ul>Remember: Mass communication to the field MUST be vetted by the Executive Director or a designee before being sent!
  44. 47. <ul><li>Beyond Excel: Pearl & MS Access </li></ul><ul><li>How does this fit? </li></ul>Microsoft Access is software that lets a user edit and maintain a database . A database refers to a complex file that contains many spreadsheets or datasheets (raw data), queries (manipulated spreadsheets), and reports (documents with variables). Pearl is a front-end for Microsoft Access that works like a specialized guide or wizard for particular tasks. Pearl, therefore, is not literally “the database” but rather how we interact with it. At NYSCA, we generally use the phrases “Pearl” and “The Database” interchangeably.
  45. 48. <ul><li>Beyond Excel: Pearl & MS Access </li></ul><ul><li>A Whole Other Lesson </li></ul><ul><li>Pearl and Access are too complex to fully explain here, but there are some critical things to know to help ensure that you get the information you need: </li></ul><ul><li>Any data contained in our database can be pulled out and worked with. Programs should know what kinds of information is actually available. </li></ul><ul><li>Information pulled from Access/Pearl/”The Database” is best transferred as a single Excel spreadsheet. </li></ul><ul><li>Matt is available to pull information from Pearl as needed. You can make a request any time you need to take a closer look at data. </li></ul>
  46. 49. <ul><li>Beyond Excel: Pearl & MS Access </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly Used Data Fields in Pearl </li></ul><ul><li>Org. Name </li></ul><ul><li>Org. AKA </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Mailing Address </li></ul><ul><li>Org. County, Upstate vs. Downstate </li></ul><ul><li>Contact Person </li></ul><ul><li>Contact Email </li></ul><ul><li>Contact Phone & Fax </li></ul><ul><li>Org. TCE </li></ul><ul><li>Grant Award Amounts </li></ul><ul><li>Grant Request Amounts </li></ul><ul><li>Org. Demographic Information (limited) </li></ul><ul><li>Panel Ratings </li></ul><ul><li>Org info by Legislative District; Legislator Contact Info </li></ul>Simply put, anything asked for in an application can be pulled out and inserted into a spreadsheet.
  47. 50. <ul><li>Beyond Excel: Pearl & MS Access </li></ul><ul><li>Existing Queries and Reports </li></ul><ul><li>There are a variety of Reports already loaded into Pearl. These reports can easily be “pulled out” as an Excel spreadsheet: </li></ul><ul><li>From Pearl, open the report that you would like to analyze. </li></ul><ul><li>Once the report is open and active (i.e., the report window is able to be edited), from the menu bar, select Tools> Office Links> Analyze with Excel . </li></ul><ul><li>Excel will open with the data from the report displayed on a spreadsheet. Note : You may need to reformat for the data to display properly. </li></ul><ul><li>Save the Excel spreadsheet to your computer for later use. </li></ul>
  48. 51. <ul><li>Thank You! </li></ul><ul><li>Please continue to use the Technology Questions Drop Box! </li></ul>

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