Reading Smoke – the Sequel     Northwest FireCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
“Sequel”?                                     “Reading Smoke” is far                                      from absolute –...
Noted thanks to…..   John Tanaka, Captain,                       NIST: the National    Everett, WA                      ...
PowerPoint NOTEThis PowerPoint can serve as a good teaching tool – but is best presented with video examples. Those are NO...
The Sequel Plan                                        Give you something to                                         help...
The Basic ProcessReading Smoke can help you answer 3 questions:1. Where, specifically, is the fire?2. How big or intense i...
Basic Process – the Science                                     3 concepts help you read                                  ...
Smoke is Fuel - Particulates                                        70% of smoke is                                      ...
Smoke is Fuel - Aerosols   Water   Hydrocarbons (black oil    droplets)   Some oils have self-    ignition temps as low...
Consider this…  The following gases create “ladder fuels” within  smoke (remember, there are particulates and aerosols  al...
Remember…                                        Your gear TTP masks                                         heat initial...
Concept #2 – Fuels have changed!                                           More synthetics                               ...
Concept 3: Triggers for Smoke           Ignition   Right Temperature & Right MixtureCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodso...
Temperature TriggersFlashpoint = smoke explosionsFirepoint = rapid fire spreadIgnition Temperature = flashover and backdra...
Mixture Triggers                            Too Rich . . .Too Lean . . .                                             Just ...
Other Prerequisites to Reading                SmokeYou must be able to determine...   The Rate of Change – getting better...
The “Reading Smoke” ProcessProcess Rules:1. Nothing is absolute2. Compare ventilation   openings (restricted or   unrestri...
The “Reading Smoke” ProcessDon’t Forget:• Turbulent vs. Laminar• Measure Rate of Change• Smoke is FUEL!      Courtesy of B...
The 3-Steps for “Reading Smoke”1.   Inventory & compare smoke     attributes: volume, velocity,     density, and color2.  ...
STEP 1: Inventory and compare the key                  attributes   Volume   Velocity    (Pressure)   Density   Color ...
VOLUME                                          Gives an impression                                          Establishes...
VELOCITY (Pressure)                                             How fast is the smoke                                    ...
Density                                       Most Important                                        Factor               ...
Color                                        Tells Stage of Heating                                        Should compli...
STEP 2: Factor in Influences    Container (defines the     significance of VVDC)    Weather    Courtesy of www.firefight...
STEP 3: Answer the Questions   Where’s the fire?   How big or Intense is    the fire?   How fast is it    changing? (Ge...
Update/Refocus                                                 Velocity trumps                                           ...
Update/Refocus                                     Turbulent smoke is                                       ready to flash...
Update/Refocus                                     Opinion: Ventilation has                                       never be...
Short Cuts (not absolute)   Black/Thick/Fast = heat and explosive   Black/Thin/Fast = flame near   White w/Speed = hot ...
Practice Time!Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
Don’t Just Be Safe – Make it Safe!  Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
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Reading smoke part 2 2 5-09

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  • Developed by Dave Dodson, Battalion Chief (ret.), Colorado . Do NOT sell or exchange money for any part of this. Many of the pictures included are private property – they are used in good faith as a training tool. Please respect this request.
  • This is an updated PowerPoint – May, 2008
  • Many have helped improve the program – no way to list everyone. Special thanks to all!
  • There are also many sources to find raw fireground footage. Use your web-search engine and list “Fire Ground Video”
  • Overview of this program
  • Show a video as a teaser.
  • The more energy firefighters spend on understanding new fire theory, the better prepared they are to read smoke. The new fire research projects by NIST are a good starting place. They have many FREE research DVDs that capture fire behavior. www.cdc.gov/nist
  • If smoke is 70% solids – then interior compartment fires will go “under-ventilated” as the solids displaces air. That equates to a more explosive environment when air is finally introduced. Soot is carbon – it can burn. Ash contains trace minerals and metals and wont burn. Ash, however, can carry amazing amounts of heat.
  • An aerosol is a suspended or propelled liquid. Heat is the propellant.
  • Compare the flammable ranges and the temperatures. Smoke is ignitable from 1-74% mix in air and as low as 450F! These gases are the high in volume in typical fires.
  • Crawling in zero-visibility smoke has never been more risky. You may not see the flame wave coming until it’s too late. Keep smoke cool!
  • The big change started in the 90’s and has become continually worse.
  • Remember the ladder fuels?
  • These triggers are arguable – as are the definitions of hostile fire events like flashover and backdraft.
  • “ Too Rich” seems to be the situation in most building fires.
  • Turbulent smoke: box can’t absorb more heat – a flashover warning. Other words for turbulent include agitated, boiling, or angry. “Laminar” means smooth, soft-billowing, or straight-line smoke movement. If the box is absorbing heat, it will cause smoke to smooth out (become laminar) as it moves through the building. If you have a video example – show it here!
  • Flames will attract your attention! Try to look past them because the future of the fire is painted by the smoke.
  • Reinforce these points often!
  • Previous lessons taught a four-step process. We just simplified it.
  • This is easy to say but hard to capture because firefighters use “light and heavy” to describe smoke. It takes practice to break that habit and get good at reading smoke.
  • Volume of smoke tells very little about the fire. It merely sets an impression.
  • Volume-pushed smoke will immediately slow down when it leaves a building. Heat-pushed will keep its speed. To find the fire location, compare liked-sized openings: wherever you see the fastest, longest duration velocity is closer to the fire. Be careful here: the size of opening ultimately determines how fast smoke can leave. A good rule of thumb: look for the fastest smoke from the most-restrictive opening – that’s probably where the fire is.
  • The thicker the smoke – the more likely you are to have a spread event – and the more dangerous (intense) the event will be.
  • Velocity trumps color because smoke can be filtered over distance or through cracks (carbon and hydrocarbon makes smoke black – these are very “sticky” and will deposit on things as smoke moves. The further smoke moves through a building, the lighter it will become.
  • Smoke that is low volume, slow velocity, thin, and white sounds like a small fire. That is true only if the “box” is small. The same attributes from more than one location of a very large box can mean a huge fire. Weather impacts smoke also. Wind can alter the attributes. Humidity creates smoke movement resistance. Air temperatures impact smoke speed. As a rule, cold/humid air will cause smoke to fall quickly and stay together. Conversely, hot/dry air will cause smoke to rise and disperse easily.
  • This is good place to insert a video example to show how the process can work.
  • Reinforce points.
  • Human life thresholds: 300 degrees F for 1 minute = death (not ALS savable).
  • “ Vent and cool” needs to be our mantra. Interior fire attack unsupported by ventilation is foolish in today’s fire environment.
  • These short-cuts are easy to learn – tell your crews to make flashcards and keep testing themselves until they are second nature.
  • Show video examples
  • If you have questions: DaveDFYFD@aol.com (and no, I cant get you video – everything I have is copyright and I’ll go to jail if I give you copies! ) There is a short training DVD on Reading Smoke marketed by Fire Engineering Books and Video. It is fairly cheap and has practice examples at the end. www.fireengineeringbooks.com.
  • Reading smoke part 2 2 5-09

    1. 1. Reading Smoke – the Sequel Northwest FireCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    2. 2. “Sequel”?  “Reading Smoke” is far from absolute – therefore there is room for interpretation  Many have “added” fingerprints to the curriculum – helping the information become more street friendlyCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    3. 3. Noted thanks to….. John Tanaka, Captain,  NIST: the National Everett, WA Institute of Science and Peter McBride, Ottawa Technology Duty Safety Officer  Bobby Halton, Ted Nee, Dave Ross, Chief of Mike West, Brian Safety for Toronto Kazmierzak, Ed Hadfield, and Gerald Billy Goldfeder, Chief of Tracy (and many more) Global F/F Safety!  You – and your emails, videos, and pictures! Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    4. 4. PowerPoint NOTEThis PowerPoint can serve as a good teaching tool – but is best presented with video examples. Those are NOT included here – you must find your own examples. www.youtube.com has many examples: search under “flashover” or “house fires.” Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    5. 5. The Sequel Plan  Give you something to help at your next structure fire  Review the basic process  Update/refocus some key points  Offer some “short cuts”Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    6. 6. The Basic ProcessReading Smoke can help you answer 3 questions:1. Where, specifically, is the fire?2. How big or intense is the fire?3. How fast is it changing? (rate and severity of fire spread) Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    7. 7. Basic Process – the Science 3 concepts help you read smoke: 1. Smoke is FUEL 2. The fuels have changed – more continuity and explosiveness than previously taught 3. The smoke has trigger pointsCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    8. 8. Smoke is Fuel - Particulates  70% of smoke is particulate  Soot (Black)  Ash (White)  Fibers/dust/pulpCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    9. 9. Smoke is Fuel - Aerosols Water Hydrocarbons (black oil droplets) Some oils have self- ignition temps as low as 460°F Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    10. 10. Consider this… The following gases create “ladder fuels” within smoke (remember, there are particulates and aerosols also).Gas Self-Ignition Temperature Flammable RangeAcrolein 450°F 3-31%Benzene 928°F 1-8%Hydrogen Cyanide 1000°F 5-40%Carbon Monoxide 1123°F 12-74% Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    11. 11. Remember…  Your gear TTP masks heat initially – you can’t feel 450°F for minutes – yet the smoke you are crawling in is ignitable!  The thicker the smoke – the more continuity of fuel between you and the fire.Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    12. 12. Concept #2 – Fuels have changed!  More synthetics  Lower density/mass  High surface-to-mass  This adds up to MORE smoke Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    13. 13. Concept 3: Triggers for Smoke Ignition Right Temperature & Right MixtureCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    14. 14. Temperature TriggersFlashpoint = smoke explosionsFirepoint = rapid fire spreadIgnition Temperature = flashover and backdraft Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    15. 15. Mixture Triggers Too Rich . . .Too Lean . . . Just Right . . . Courtesy of www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    16. 16. Other Prerequisites to Reading SmokeYou must be able to determine... The Rate of Change – getting better or worse in seconds or minutes. Is the “box” absorbing heat? Laminar vs. TURBULENT flow Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    17. 17. The “Reading Smoke” ProcessProcess Rules:1. Nothing is absolute2. Compare ventilation openings (restricted or unrestricted, smoke or no smoke)3. Watch the smoke –not the flames! Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    18. 18. The “Reading Smoke” ProcessDon’t Forget:• Turbulent vs. Laminar• Measure Rate of Change• Smoke is FUEL! Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    19. 19. The 3-Steps for “Reading Smoke”1. Inventory & compare smoke attributes: volume, velocity, density, and color2. Factor in influences that change the meaning of VVDC3. Answer the questions: Fire location? Size of fire? What will it do next? (better or worse/seconds or minutes) Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    20. 20. STEP 1: Inventory and compare the key attributes Volume Velocity (Pressure) Density Color Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    21. 21. VOLUME  Gives an impression  Establishes relativity to the “box”  Remember: a small volume of smoke from a very large box is significant  Volume is a source of pressure (velocity)Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    22. 22. VELOCITY (Pressure)  How fast is the smoke leaving?  Turbulent or Laminar?  Is laminar smoke heat or volume pushed?  Compare velocity from like-sized openings to find fire locationCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    23. 23. Density  Most Important Factor  Tells you the future  Continuity of Fuel  Likelihood of an Event  “Degree” of the EventCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    24. 24. Color  Tells Stage of Heating  Should compliment velocity to find location of fire  “Brown” Smoke is usually unfinished wood being heated  Remember, smoke color can be filtered over distance or through resistanceCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    25. 25. STEP 2: Factor in Influences Container (defines the significance of VVDC) Weather Courtesy of www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    26. 26. STEP 3: Answer the Questions Where’s the fire? How big or Intense is the fire? How fast is it changing? (Getting better or worse – in seconds or minutes?) Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    27. 27. Update/Refocus  Velocity trumps color  ANY thick, fast moving smoke is ignitable  Zero visibility makes you a slave to your environmentCourtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    28. 28. Update/Refocus Turbulent smoke is ready to flash – and indicates that floor temperatures are past human life thresholds (zero rescue profile!) Manage it – but reduce your risk-taking!Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    29. 29. Update/Refocus Opinion: Ventilation has never been more important and needs to be our #1 tactical priority (make the building behave!*) *Tom Brennan – we’ll never forget you!Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    30. 30. Short Cuts (not absolute) Black/Thick/Fast = heat and explosive Black/Thin/Fast = flame near White w/Speed = hot – but fire is distant Uniform speed/color (steady flow & light color)from many places = deep seated fire Brown = unfinished wood being heated Turbulent = Flashover Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    31. 31. Practice Time!Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com
    32. 32. Don’t Just Be Safe – Make it Safe! Courtesy of Battalion Chief Dave Dodson & www.firefighterclosecalls.com

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