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James Falconer Kirkup, FRSL (23 April 1918 – 10 May 2009) was a
prolific English poet, translator and travel writer. He wr...
About the poem –
The poem talks about the concept of global
brotherhood and equality without any place for
any kind of pre...
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9 no men are foreign

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9 no men are foreign

  1. 1. James Falconer Kirkup, FRSL (23 April 1918 – 10 May 2009) was a prolific English poet, translator and travel writer. He wrote over 30 books, including autobiographies, novels and plays. He became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1962.After writing simple verses and rhymes from the age of six and the publication of his first poetry book, 'The Drowned Sailor' in 1947, Kirkup's published works encompassed several dozen collections of poetry, six volumes of autobiography, over a hundred monographs of original work and translations and thousands of shorter pieces in journals and periodicals. His skilled writing of haiku and tanka is acknowledged internationally. Many of his poems recalled his childhood days in the North East, and are featured in such publications as The Sense of the Visit, To the Ancestral North, Throwback, and Shields Sketches. His home town of South Shields now holds a growing collection of his works in the Central Library, and artifacts from his time in Japan are housed in the nearby Museum. His last volume of poetry was published during the summer of 2008 by Red Squirrel Press, and was launched at a special event at Central Library in South Shields.
  2. 2. About the poem – The poem talks about the concept of global brotherhood and equality without any place for any kind of prejudice. It can be described as a post colonial poem which talks of globalisation and its resultant human unity worldwide. The poem seems to be written at a crucial time (around late 1940s) when the entire colonial world was revolting against their oppressors.

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