The National Picture        Achievement Gap               • 23 million low-income students               • On average, beg...
“We cannot afford to spend nearly10 months of every year devotingenormous amounts of intellect,energy and money to promoti...
Horizons Closes the Gaps• Award-winning, high-quality summer learning programs• Low-income public school students• Indepen...
The Horizons Approach• 9-year commitment beginning in Kindergarten• Students with broad range of academic abilities• Six-w...
Horizons’ Impact• Reverses effects of summer slide• Two to three month gain in reading and math skills• Students, staff re...
Horizons Expansion Efforts
Expansion Challenges• Limited number of schools• Limit to the number of students at each school• Dependence on private phi...
Horizons at Harley
Horizons at Harley Strategic Goals       Program             Program       Quality &           Financial     Effectiveness...
Contributions to Community• The Horizons Community has invested over $2M and  thousands of hours of volunteer support to m...
Community Involvement Strategies   Engaging community partners to  enhance Horizons at Harley and to      further summer l...
Horizons at Harley /                                     Community InvolvementStrategies      Rochester, NY               ...
Community Involvement StrategiesUniversities & Colleges•   U of R Get Real Science Program•   SUNY Geneseo Literacy Clinic...
Community Involvement StrategiesPublic /Gov. Sector• NYS / ED Summer Food Program ($24,000 reimbursement in 2010)• Rochest...
Community Involvement StrategiesNon-profit Sector•   Foodlink and Rochester Roots•   Latino Rotary (volunteers, books)•   ...
Community Involvement StrategiesCorporate Partnerships•   Funding (Canandaigua National Bank)•   Board Members and Volunte...
The Challenge•   Rochester and the Nation face a crisis in public education often    referred to as the Achievement Gap•  ...
Background•   In 2008, Horizons at Harley reached out to other independent schools,    public schools and colleges and uni...
Greater Rochester Summer Learning           AssociationThe mission of the Greater Rochester Summer LearningAssociation (GR...
Sustainable Funding Sources
Monroe Community CollegeSignificance Horizons to MCC• Locally• Nationally
Monroe Community CollegeResources Unique to• Higher Education• Community Colleges
Monroe Community CollegeInstitutional Support• Pilot• Moving forward
Power in Partnership: How Graduate Schools, Private Schools, and Community Colleges are Working Together to Serve Students
Power in Partnership: How Graduate Schools, Private Schools, and Community Colleges are Working Together to Serve Students
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Power in Partnership: How Graduate Schools, Private Schools, and Community Colleges are Working Together to Serve Students

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Come hear the story about how four different education institutions in Rochester, NY - an independent K-12 school, a university, a community college, and a small, private college - joined forces through a summer learning program to support K-8 public school students in their community. We will share how this innovative partnership evolved, the diverse reasons for which each institution entered the partnership, the unexpected synergies that have developed, and how this model is being replicated throughout the nation.

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  • Presenters:
    • Raffaella Borasi, Dean, Warner School of Education, University of Rochester
    • Timothy Cottrell, Head of School, Harley School
    • Kate DaBoll-Lavoie, Chair, Department of Inclusive Childhood Education, Nazareth College
    • Clayton Jones, Assistant to the Vice President of Academic Services, Monroe Community College
    • Lorna Smith, CEO, Horizons National
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  • Faye cranked this out—she rocks!
  • Power in Partnership: How Graduate Schools, Private Schools, and Community Colleges are Working Together to Serve Students

    1. 1. The National Picture Achievement Gap • 23 million low-income students • On average, begin Kindergarten 6 months behind • Gap grows to 2.5 years by fifth grade • 1.2 million students drop out of high school per school year • More than half are from minority groups • Low-income students 6x more likely to drop out11U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics 2006
    2. 2. “We cannot afford to spend nearly10 months of every year devotingenormous amounts of intellect,energy and money to promotingstudent learning and achievement,and then walk away from that The National Pictureinvestment every summer.” Jeff Smink, National Summer Summer Learning LossLearning Association Over half of the ninth-grade achievement gap between lower and higher income youth can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities during the elementary school years1 1Alexander et al. 2007.
    3. 3. Horizons Closes the Gaps• Award-winning, high-quality summer learning programs• Low-income public school students• Independent school and college partners• Provides opportunity to learn new academic, social and life skills
    4. 4. The Horizons Approach• 9-year commitment beginning in Kindergarten• Students with broad range of academic abilities• Six-week summer session with additional year-round support• Project-based learning• Professional teachers, 5 to 1 student teacher ratio• Swimming!
    5. 5. Horizons’ Impact• Reverses effects of summer slide• Two to three month gain in reading and math skills• Students, staff retention for 6 years on average• Creates love of learning and increased engagement• Improved high school graduation and college matriculation
    6. 6. Horizons Expansion Efforts
    7. 7. Expansion Challenges• Limited number of schools• Limit to the number of students at each school• Dependence on private philanthropy
    8. 8. Horizons at Harley
    9. 9. Horizons at Harley Strategic Goals Program Program Quality & Financial Effectiveness Sustainability Connections With Other Programs
    10. 10. Contributions to Community• The Horizons Community has invested over $2M and thousands of hours of volunteer support to make all this possible• Horizons at Harley is a powerful force for good in Rochester and serves as an example for other communities
    11. 11. Community Involvement Strategies Engaging community partners to enhance Horizons at Harley and to further summer learning
    12. 12. Horizons at Harley / Community InvolvementStrategies Rochester, NY Public / Gov. Sector Non – Horizons Profit Corporate At Sector Sector Harley Universities & Colleges
    13. 13. Community Involvement StrategiesUniversities & Colleges• U of R Get Real Science Program• SUNY Geneseo Literacy Clinic• Graduate level Social Work Interns• Marketing and Administrative Interns• Student Teachers• College and Career Field Trips• New affiliate sites (U of R, MCC, Nazareth)
    14. 14. Community Involvement StrategiesPublic /Gov. Sector• NYS / ED Summer Food Program ($24,000 reimbursement in 2010)• Rochester City School District (busing, recruiting of students, student academic tracking, information sharing)• City of Rochester Department of Youth Services and Recreation (extended day programming)• Charter Schools (Character Development Curriculum, recruiting of students)
    15. 15. Community Involvement StrategiesNon-profit Sector• Foodlink and Rochester Roots• Latino Rotary (volunteers, books)• Greater Rochester Literacy Commission• United Way & RACF (funding, training)• Children’s Institute (Data tracking and management & meeting space)• The Ad Council (marketing plan, professional volunteers)• Harley School (Board members, specialty teachers)
    16. 16. Community Involvement StrategiesCorporate Partnerships• Funding (Canandaigua National Bank)• Board Members and Volunteers• Sponsorships (Go-kart build / STEM, Financial Literacy)• Training space• Sponsor the Annual Horizons Garden Party
    17. 17. The Challenge• Rochester and the Nation face a crisis in public education often referred to as the Achievement Gap• In Rochester, 84% of RCSD students are on the free or reduced cost lunch program. Fewer that 50% graduate from high school on time. Fewer than 6% are deemed ready to go on to higher education (NYS Board of Regents College Readiness Data 6/19/11).• Research demonstrates that approximately 2/3rds of the achievement gap is directly attributable to summer learning loss.
    18. 18. Background• In 2008, Horizons at Harley reached out to other independent schools, public schools and colleges and universities in the area.• During summer 2009 and 2010, a number of leaders (presidents, deans, faculty members) from these educational institutions visited Harley to see Horizons in action.• Joe and Nancy Briggs, David and Shirley Kearns, and the Marie C. and Joseph C. Wilson Foundation stepped forward to contribute a total of $400,000 to initiate new summer learning programs in Rochester.• In July of 2011, the Greater Rochester Summer Learning Association was formed with eight member institutions.
    19. 19. Greater Rochester Summer Learning AssociationThe mission of the Greater Rochester Summer LearningAssociation (GRSLA) is to promote the development ofsustainable, high-quality summer learning programs for low-income children in Rochester and in the Greater Rochester area.
    20. 20. Sustainable Funding Sources
    21. 21. Monroe Community CollegeSignificance Horizons to MCC• Locally• Nationally
    22. 22. Monroe Community CollegeResources Unique to• Higher Education• Community Colleges
    23. 23. Monroe Community CollegeInstitutional Support• Pilot• Moving forward

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