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THE ROLE OF SCHOOL HEALTH COMMITTEES IN
HIV PREVENTION
THE 6TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PEER
EDUCATION, SEXUALITY AND H...
Background
School Health Committees (SHCs) are platforms
that bring together schools and community to
address the health c...
Members: Head Teacher, teacher in charge,
PTAs’, Education board and sponsor, special
needs, MoH (Public Health Officer, C...
Rationale of SHCs
• Increased enrollment due to Universal Primary
Education: enrollment increased from 5.9m in
2002 to ove...
Rationale cont…
• High rate of alcohol and substance abuse
among youth
• Health care services often are not youth friendly...
Role of SHCs: They enable learning institutions to:
• Link the school to health facilities
• Focus and advocate for suppor...
7
Role of SHCs also enables young people to:
• Access information, skills and knowledge to
prepare them for their future s...
HOPE Program: 4-year USAID/PEPFAR funded
program to promote HIV prevention among school
age children.
• Program design rec...
HOPE Program has supported SHCs to:
– Strengthen linkages to health facilities
– Hold community events that brought togeth...
Challenges
• Inadequate information on Adolescent Sexual
Reproductive Health (ASRH) & their role as
parents and community
...
Recommendations
• Improve advocacy mechanisms to cater for ASRH
services and IEC materials.
• Train health & service provi...
Conclusion
• SHC can help to strengthen partnership &
collaboration of all stakeholders on health
concerns including HIV p...
Acknowledgement: HOPE Program Team
• Betty Adera
• Fred Nyagah
• Ann Wahinya
• Lily Murei
• Kimberly Tilock
• HOPE Program...
14
SHUKRANI
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THE ROLE OF SCHOOL HEALTH COMMITTEES IN HIV PREVENTION

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THE ROLE OF SCHOOL HEALTH COMMITTEES IN HIV PREVENTION

  1. 1. THE ROLE OF SCHOOL HEALTH COMMITTEES IN HIV PREVENTION THE 6TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PEER EDUCATION, SEXUALITY AND HIV&AIDS 2014 18-20th June 2014 Luciana Koske Global Communities 1
  2. 2. Background School Health Committees (SHCs) are platforms that bring together schools and community to address the health concerns of the students. MoH and MoEST developed the Kenya National School Health Policy and Guidelines together with an implementation framework The Policy advocates for formation of SHC and SHC structures at County and Sub-county levels Focus is on Comprehensive School Health Program 2
  3. 3. Members: Head Teacher, teacher in charge, PTAs’, Education board and sponsor, special needs, MoH (Public Health Officer, Community nurse, extension worker) & students. This presentation seeks to: • Create awareness on the Comprehensive School Health Program through SHCs to make schools a healthy place. • Raise awareness on importance of linkages and networking within the community 3
  4. 4. Rationale of SHCs • Increased enrollment due to Universal Primary Education: enrollment increased from 5.9m in 2002 to over 8m today. • Declining parental guidance and support due to competing demands. • High rates of HIV infection among the young people - 60% of adolescents are sexually active by 18 years (KAIS, 2007) • Low levels of knowledge on HIV prevention among young people (SACMEQ, 2010) 4
  5. 5. Rationale cont… • High rate of alcohol and substance abuse among youth • Health care services often are not youth friendly • Inadequate support and linkages between schools and communities in managing youth health care Recognizing these challenges the government established the idea of SHC – through introduction of National Health Policy and the current Education Sector Policy on HIV and AIDS which 5
  6. 6. Role of SHCs: They enable learning institutions to: • Link the school to health facilities • Focus and advocate for support on priority areas e.g. values & Life skills, Gender issues, Child rights, protection & responsibilities, water, sanitation & hygiene, nutrition, disease prevention &control, special needs and environmental safety • Develop action plans & mobilize resources in line with health priorities of the school • Encourage community-owned behavioral 6
  7. 7. 7 Role of SHCs also enables young people to: • Access information, skills and knowledge to prepare them for their future sexual lives • Gain confidence & improve on their health when their parents and adults are concerned about their welfare • Improve their SRH and protect themselves against teen pregnancy, STIs, including HIV through linkages to health services available • Take advantage of educational and other opportunities that will impact their lifelong well-being
  8. 8. HOPE Program: 4-year USAID/PEPFAR funded program to promote HIV prevention among school age children. • Program design recognizes the critical importance of involving & strengthening parents, family networks and communities in youth-focused interventions for greater impact and long-term change. • Program extends support beyond the school to parents & communities to create a mutually- supportive system to influence behavior change. 8
  9. 9. HOPE Program has supported SHCs to: – Strengthen linkages to health facilities – Hold community events that brought together Stakeholders to understand SHC process – Encourage participation of BOMs & establishment of PTAs in school activities. – Engage CHEWs (MoH) to act as link between school and health facilities. - Participate in forums and discussions with young people - Encourage parents to enrol for capacity 9
  10. 10. Challenges • Inadequate information on Adolescent Sexual Reproductive Health (ASRH) & their role as parents and community • Inadequate capacity (financial & human)to respond to young people’s health needs and concerns • Stigma and discrimination of Youth Living with HIV at school and community level • Inconsistent messaging and inadequate documentation of lessons learned and best 10
  11. 11. Recommendations • Improve advocacy mechanisms to cater for ASRH services and IEC materials. • Train health & service providers towards youth- friendliness. • Ensure consensus on relevant interventions and their socioeconomic and cultural appropriateness. • Recognise and sustainably address the unique needs of YLHIV at school. • Strengthen coordination for consistent messages11
  12. 12. Conclusion • SHC can help to strengthen partnership & collaboration of all stakeholders on health concerns including HIV prevention, care and treatment at school & community level. • A multi-sectoral approach to comprehensive sexuality information for young people at school and community level is needed—SHC help create this linkage. • Operationalize the youth friendly services policy to enable youth access health care 12
  13. 13. Acknowledgement: HOPE Program Team • Betty Adera • Fred Nyagah • Ann Wahinya • Lily Murei • Kimberly Tilock • HOPE Program Partners 13
  14. 14. 14 SHUKRANI

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