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Rhode is fnd, providence, 11 8-12

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Rhode is fnd, providence, 11 8-12

  1. 1. Teaching artists and the future of education:Finding hope in unexpected placesRhode Island Foundation November 8, 2012 Nick RabkinInsert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 1
  2. 2. A better mop? Or better thana mop?Teaching Artists and the Future of Education 2
  3. 3. Arts education improvesstudent outcomes• Better grades Also, more likely to know• Proficiency in math something about• Higher standardized test scores the arts!• Less likely to be bored or drop out• More friends of other races• Less TV• More likely to go to college, graduate, and get a jobInsert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 3
  4. 4. Very big dealCorrelation It’s the arts, stupid!strongest for low-income students.Insert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 4
  5. 5. After nearly a century ofgrowth, arts ed has declinedfor three decades. Childhood arts education, 1930- 2008 Up 184% from 1930 to 1980, down 25% from 1980 to 2008 with no sign that the decline is slowing.Teaching Artists and the Future of Education 5
  6. 6. Teaching artists Significant numbers of Teaching Artists have entered schools since 1975. They’ve mitigated, but not reversed the decline. Photo: Khanisha Foster with students, Project AIM/CCAP. 6
  7. 7. Jane Addams founded Hull-House in 1889
  8. 8. Benny Goodman at a Hull-House special event;Louis Armstrong with his cornet teacher from theHome for Colored Waifs on TV in 1963.Insert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 8
  9. 9. New pedagogy emerged at the settlements,breaking with conservatory veneration of theclassical world and elite patronage, and includedrigorous and critical exploration of the real world..Insert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 9
  10. 10. Viola SpolinInsert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 10
  11. 11. Art for arts’ sake—art for people’ssake: different pedagogies. Insert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 11
  12. 12. A Swiffer for education?
  13. 13. A Nation at Risk, the template for school reform forthree decades. Descarte’s error Arts education is understood as affective and expressive, not academic and cognitive, a distraction from ‘real learning.’Teaching Artists and the Future of Education 13
  14. 14. Fiscal crisis New York fiscal crisis, 1975. Structural economic changes provoked a sustained series of crises that choked most large school systems from the mid-1970s on. The crisis has taken different forms and continues today. 14
  15. 15. Tax rebellion From Proposition 13 (1978) to the Tea Parky 15
  16. 16. Has school reform worked?• HS graduation rate flat over last 20 years 16
  17. 17. Has school reform worked?• HS graduation rate flat over last 20 years• Dropout rate remains high 17
  18. 18. Has school reform worked?• HS graduation rate flat over last 20 years• Dropout rate remains high• Achievement gap narrowed in 70s, but has widened since 18
  19. 19. Has school reform worked?• HS graduation rate flat over last 20 years• Dropout rate remains high• Achievement gap narrowed in 70s, but has widened since• US students have fallen farther behind students from more countries in more subjects 19
  20. 20. Has school reform worked?• HS graduation rate flat over last 20 years• Dropout rate remains high• Achievement gap narrowed in 70s, but has widened since• US students have fallen farther behind students from more countries in more subjects• Charters’ record is no better than conventional public schools 20
  21. 21. Are TAs good teachers?Aside from socio-economic background, good teaching is themost important predictor of student success in school.
  22. 22. What is good teaching?• Student centered: Balances students’ interests, questions, and prior knowledge, with new challenges, choices and responsibilitiesZemelman, Daniels & Hyde (2005) Best Practice: Today’s Standards for Teaching and Learning in America’s SchoolsPerkins (2010) Making Learning Whole: How Seven Principles of Teaching Can Transform EducationSmith, Lee, and Newman (2001) Instruction and Achievement in Chicago Elementary Schools 22
  23. 23. What is good teaching?• Student centered: Balances students’ interests, questions, and prior knowledge, with new challenges, choices and responsibilities• Deeply cognitive: Learning is the consequence of thinking and making work about meaningful, rich, compelling problems, concepts, and ideasZemelman, Daniels & Hyde (2005) Best Practice: Today’s Standards for Teaching and Learning in America’s SchoolsPerkins (2010) Making Learning Whole: How Seven Principles of Teaching Can Transform EducationSmith, Lee, and Newman (2001) Instruction and Achievement in Chicago Elementary Schools 23
  24. 24. What is good teaching?• Student centered: Balances students’ interests, questions, and prior knowledge, with new challenges, choices and responsibilities• Deeply cognitive: Learning is the consequence of thinking and making work about meaningful, rich, compelling problems, concepts, and ideas• Social: Collaborative activities are more powerful than individualist strategiesZemelman, Daniels & Hyde (2005) Best Practice: Today’s Standards for Teaching and Learning in America’s SchoolsPerkins (2010) Making Learning Whole: How Seven Principles of Teaching Can Transform EducationSmith, Lee, and Newman (2001) Instruction and Achievement in Chicago Elementary Schools 24
  25. 25. Engagement is job oneFor many, ‘A slow process of disengagement begins in 3rdgrade…’ Photo by Joel WanekPhoto by Joel Wanek 25
  26. 26. VoiceAn aesthetic signature and a perspective on the world and life, aset of concerns, issues, and ideas that matter to students. Studentwork from Project AIM/CCAP, Joel Wanek, Teaching ArtistCourtesy Project AIM, photo by Joel Wanek 26
  27. 27. Building a community in theclassroomInsert Presentation Title and Any Confidentiality Information 27
  28. 28. Arts integration: The ‘elegant fit’:Moving the mind, connecting ideas, andbuilding understanding. Wheatstacks lesson credit: Luke Albrecht, 8th grade math, Crown Academy, Chicago See: AIMPrint: New Relationships in the Arts and Leaning, Weiss and Lichtenstein. Renaissance in the Classroom, Burnaford, Aprill and Weiss. 28
  29. 29. Build demand for arts edResearch must be complemented with real stories. TAs are a greatsource.
  30. 30. Make the field sustainableUnder-employment, low pay, and health insurance are seriousproblems for artists. Funders and employers need to takethem seriously.
  31. 31. Arts education is vital to thefuture of the arts, too.Teaching artists are experts on how to create more engagingand meaningful artistic experiences
  32. 32. Develop arts integrationIntegrated and disciplinary instruction are more alike than differentwhen grounded in good practice. Let’s get beyond the conflict andinvest in serious development!
  33. 33. Arts ed in both schools andcommunities
  34. 34. Advocate for specialists andTAsGood schools have both already. Make them models forcollaboration, not competition.
  35. 35. Assessment – the nextfrontierBring the authentic assessment of the arts into classrooms.
  36. 36. Professional development• Use the best arts pedagogy to train teaching artists AND teachers in all settings. Hands-on, project-based, problem oriented, learning by doing.
  37. 37. Nick RabkinSenior Research Scientistnickrabkin@gmail.comPhotos by Joel WanekThank You!

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