Customer Insight Public information 1
Choosing a GP & NHS Choices data
May 2012
Customer Insight Public information 2
Introduction
• Investigate how some new measures published on the site would be rece...
Customer Insight Public information 3
Methodology & Respondents – Stage 1 (Qual)
• Respondents were recruited from our pan...
Customer Insight Public information 4
Sample and Methodology – Stage 2
Type of survey Pop-up survey which was placed on th...
Customer Insight Public information 5
Stage 1 – Qualitative
interviews
Customer Insight Public information 6
Reactions to composite scores 1/3
Composite Scores
• All respondents received the fo...
Customer Insight Public information 7
Reactions to composite scores 2/2
× General composite score of practice performance
...
Customer Insight Public information 8
Reactions to composite scores 3/3
 Composite score (based on subset of measures) re...
Customer Insight Public information 9
Stage 2 – Quantitative
survey
Customer Insight Public information 10
Choosing a GP
We would like you to imagine that you have just moved to a new area a...
Customer Insight Public information 11
Using information to choose a GP
Q. On a scale of 1-5 where 1= not at all relevant ...
Customer Insight Public information 12
Different measures to compare GPs
Q. It is also possible to compare GP practices in...
Customer Insight Public information 13
Users were shown an image of the Index of
Multiple Deprivation scores on scorecard
...
Customer Insight Public information 14
Expenditure on secondary care
14%
7%
13%
19%
39%
9%
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50%
1 not at...
Customer Insight Public information 15
Patient Survey Data
Customer Insight Public information 16
Users were shown two images of how patient
survey data could be presented on scorec...
Customer Insight Public information 17
Patient survey data presentation
21%
52%
4%
23%
Unbanded data Banded data shown wit...
Customer Insight Public information 18
Questions and comments to:
thechoicesteam@nhschoices.nhs.uk
please quote “Slideshar...
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Choosing a GP and NHS Choices data

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This report looks at findings from web survey and depth interviews about use of the site amongst people looking for a new GP. It identifies what factors are important to people and provides feedback on some proposed new indicators.

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Choosing a GP and NHS Choices data

  1. 1. Customer Insight Public information 1 Choosing a GP & NHS Choices data May 2012
  2. 2. Customer Insight Public information 2 Introduction • Investigate how some new measures published on the site would be received with site users. • In addition, the data team wanted to understand which of the existing scorecard items were most important to users as well as to gathering sufficient information to inform future developments of the scorecard Research objectives In order to meet the business objectives the following research objectives were developed; • Explore whether banding of survey items is considered useful • Understand the impact of composite measures of GP performance i.e. whether they are relevant, understood or useful • Understand the need for general composite scores covering all aspects of care • Explore reactions to suggestions for composites for GP choices in terms of usefulness when choosing a GP practice • Investigate the perceived utility of Choose & Book • Explore reactions to the Index of multiple deprivation (IMD) data • Identify the need for immunisation data and information on expenditure on secondary care • Understand reactions to data relating to A&E admissions, emergency appointments and 1st OP appointments
  3. 3. Customer Insight Public information 3 Methodology & Respondents – Stage 1 (Qual) • Respondents were recruited from our panel of site users who had all stated an interest in taking part in research. Respondents were invited to our offices for a face to face interview • The interviews were qualitative and each lasted for 60 minutes • Respondents were asked about their usage and impressions of the GP scorecard and were also asked for their feedback on the use of composite scores • The interviews were also used to explore the PIMS GP profile which was part of a different study • A total of 9 interviews were conducted among men and women from a range of different ages • All respondents were site users and were using the internet on a daily basis. • The majority had used the site for GP related information in the past and many had used the GP comparison
  4. 4. Customer Insight Public information 4 Sample and Methodology – Stage 2 Type of survey Pop-up survey which was placed on the Find Services hub page. Those not looking for information relating to a GP were screened out of the survey Methodology Online quantitative survey Fieldwork dates 4th – 26th April 2012 Sample Total sample completes n= 301 Sample distribution General public – self-selected sample of people who visit the site looking for information about their GP. Following on from the qualitative stage of the research a quantitative survey was completed
  5. 5. Customer Insight Public information 5 Stage 1 – Qualitative interviews
  6. 6. Customer Insight Public information 6 Reactions to composite scores 1/3 Composite Scores • All respondents received the following explanation of the idea of the proposed composite scores; • Overall clinical performance - The proposed composite score would be 1 score i.e. 1 number which would represent the GP practices performance across 68 clinical measures. Respondents were given the opportunity to look over the 68 clinical measures to be included • Respondents were also asked for their thoughts on a composite based on a subset of the clinical measures e.g. on diabetes and on patient feedback • In addition, respondents were asked what they would expect from a composite score on ‘quality of prescribing’ Overall reactions • Site users have mixed reactions to the idea of using composite scores and are generally uninterested in seeing clinical data or indicators • Respondents were more interested in softer measures relating to a GP practice such as opening hours, car parking, friendliness of staff and patient feedback
  7. 7. Customer Insight Public information 7 Reactions to composite scores 2/2 × General composite score of practice performance • Overall a general composite on practice performance was not considered to be a good use of data, an aggregated score perceived to mean little in terms of the individual conditions • Would be even less useful to someone in good health • Appears to be a measure of the local demographic (and how many people suffer from different conditions) rather than how the GP handles these conditions and this could be misleading • Looks like it could be used as an NHS management tool • Does not account for variability in the practices competency in different areas, and could be misleading if it were interpreted in this way • Furthermore, it is difficult to understand what a composite score is and a detailed human explanation would be needed
  8. 8. Customer Insight Public information 8 Reactions to composite scores 3/3  Composite score (based on subset of measures) related to a specific condition e.g. diabetes • Could be very relevant if the score related to individual conditions • However, an explanation of its meaning would be necessary  Composite on patient experience/satisfaction • Patient feedback score would be interesting to most respondents • Reflects that respondents want to know that other patients are happy with the practice × Composite score on quality of prescribing • Respondents are generally unclear regarding what this may tell them • Is it on appropriate prescribing? Prescribing rates? Is it cost savings associated with prescribing generics? • The concept of a quality of prescribing score, leads to general confusion as it is widely believed that the patient has the right to assume competence relating to prescribing
  9. 9. Customer Insight Public information 9 Stage 2 – Quantitative survey
  10. 10. Customer Insight Public information 10 Choosing a GP We would like you to imagine that you have just moved to a new area and you would like to find a GP practice to join, please tell us what information would be most useful for you? • There are many factors which contribute to the decision to join a GP practice • Patients are particularly interested in the practicalities of visiting a GP surgery as well as the friendliness of staff and GPs Base n=714 comments 3% 4% 5% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 11% 13% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% Ease of appointment booking Referral to clinics/specialists Appointment booking system Patient feedback Waiting times Gender of GP Services available Friendliness of staff & GPs Location Opening hours % of comments What kind of hours of service is offered How far is it from where I live? A Dr who is not rude Friendly and helpful receptionists and Drs
  11. 11. Customer Insight Public information 11 Using information to choose a GP Q. On a scale of 1-5 where 1= not at all relevant and 5 = very relevant, please rate the following information in terms of how relevant it would be to you if you were choosing a new GP 21% 34% 16% 7% 6% 6% 7% 4% 4% 12% 10% 9% 5% 6% 4% 4% 3% 2% 22% 15% 23% 15% 17% 17% 14% 8% 7% 20% 15% 21% 26% 20% 20% 20% 25% 18% 26% 27% 30% 47% 52% 53% 55% 60% 70% Proximity to public transport/bus routes Car parking facilities GP special interests Services/clinics offered Patient feedback Distance from home/work Availability of evening/weekend appointments Availability of appointments 2 days in advance Availability of same day/within 48 hour appointments 1 = not at all relevant 2 3 4 5 = very relevant • Flexible appointment times, distance from home/work and patient feedback information are particularly relevant to users when choosing a GP. n=301 88% Score 4&5 85% 75% 73% 72% 73% 51% 42% 46%
  12. 12. Customer Insight Public information 12 Different measures to compare GPs Q. It is also possible to compare GP practices in terms of a number of different measures, we would like you to tell us whether you would be interested in seeing the following measures/information (some of which already appear on the site) when choosing a GP 3% 5% 7% 9% 6% 66% 56% 53% 45% 44% 31% 39% 40% 46% 51% Number of patients receiving seasonal flu vaccinations Number of patients admitted to hospital in an emergency Number of patients who attended A&E from the practice Number of patients using choose and book, online hospital booking service Number of patients referred for an outpatient appointment Don't understand this information Not useful/would not use Yes, I would be interested in this information about the practice • Of the suggested measures relating to attendance at hospital, it is not clear which respondents would be most interested in seeing. For example, 51% of respondents would be interested in the number of patients referred for an outpatient appointments, but 44% would not find this useful • Furthermore, 66% of respondents would not find the number of patients receiving seasonal flu vaccinations useful. n=301
  13. 13. Customer Insight Public information 13 Users were shown an image of the Index of Multiple Deprivation scores on scorecard 26% 9% 19% 12% 15% 20% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 1 not at all useful 2 3 4 5 very useful Don't know How useful is this information on a scale of 1 (not at all useful) to 5 (very useful?) Have you ever looked at this score before? 11% 86% 3% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes No Don't remember • There is no real consensus as to how useful this measure was. However, only 15% of respondents rated it as ‘very useful’ and 86% had never looked at this score before, suggesting that site users are unsure what the score will mean for them n=301n=301
  14. 14. Customer Insight Public information 14 Expenditure on secondary care 14% 7% 13% 19% 39% 9% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 1 not at all interested 2 3 4 5 very interested Don't know Q. We are considering including a measure which relates to the level of expenditure on secondary care, by secondary care we mean healthcare that is not provided by the first Dr that you see e.g. referrals to a hospital or clinic. Each GP practice spends a certain amount of their budget referring patients to secondary care. How interested on a scale of 1-5 where 1 = not at all and 5 = very interested would you be in seeing this type of information? • 58% of respondents would be very interested or somewhat interested in measures relating to the expenditure on secondary care • Many respondents agree that this measure will provide and indication of the level of care they may receive n=301 5% 6% 7% 12% 16% 24% 0% 10% 20% 30% Indicates whether patient gets the best treatment Indication of level of service Just interested To see how budget is spent Shows positive GP attitude towards patient care Shows willingness to refer Q. Why do you say that n=151 comments 58%
  15. 15. Customer Insight Public information 15 Patient Survey Data
  16. 16. Customer Insight Public information 16 Users were shown two images of how patient survey data could be presented on scorecard Banded survey data Unbanded survey data
  17. 17. Customer Insight Public information 17 Patient survey data presentation 21% 52% 4% 23% Unbanded data Banded data shown with icons Neither, I would prefer something else I don't have a preference Q. Which of the two presentations of data do you prefer? n=301 • 52% of respondents preferred the banded data shown with icons. However, there was still a significant minority that preferred the percentages displayed (21%) or had no preference (23%) Base n=235 comments 35% – Ease & clarity 31% – Prefer visuals 18% – Easier to understand the data Base n=93 comments 37% – Easier to understand the percentages 32% – Prefer data/percentages 20% – Dislike visuals, could be misleading Percentages are clearer and easier to understand Better to view at a glance The colours make it easier to spot what is what Graphic image is more powerful and translates into any language Why? Banding is too generic, would prefer to see the % and the number Icons look more user friendly
  18. 18. Customer Insight Public information 18 Questions and comments to: thechoicesteam@nhschoices.nhs.uk please quote “Slideshare” in subject line

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