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Rope rescue set up

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A review of the Technical Rope Rescue set-up procedure.

Published in: Devices & Hardware
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Rope rescue set up

  1. 1. Rope Rescue Set-Up Review Newport Fire Department
  2. 2. Overview 1. Anchoring/Picket System 2. Anchor Plate
  3. 3. Anchoring PrincipalsAnchoring Principals 1.1. Anchors are the foundation of the rope rescueAnchors are the foundation of the rope rescue system.system. 2.2. The actual physical strength and capacity ofThe actual physical strength and capacity of an anchor is generally unknown. What wean anchor is generally unknown. What we determine to be “bombproof” is really adetermine to be “bombproof” is really a judgment based on knowledge, training, andjudgment based on knowledge, training, and experience.experience.
  4. 4. Good AnchorsGood Anchors 1. Structural Steel (Properly1. Structural Steel (Properly connected to a structure)connected to a structure) 2. Reinforced Concrete2. Reinforced Concrete 3. Bulk Masonry3. Bulk Masonry 4. Heavy Machinery4. Heavy Machinery (Cranes, Bulldozer, etc.)(Cranes, Bulldozer, etc.) 5. Fire Apparatus5. Fire Apparatus 6. Natural Anchors6. Natural Anchors (Big *#^&%ing Rock(Big *#^&%ing Rock / Big LIVE rooted/ Big LIVE rooted tree)tree) 7. HVAC Units (If7. HVAC Units (If properly secured toproperly secured to the structure)the structure) 8. Pickets8. Pickets
  5. 5. Bad AnchorsBad Anchors 1.1. Insulated PipeInsulated Pipe 2.2. Cast Iron Pipe (StandCast Iron Pipe (Stand pipes and Sprinkler risers)pipes and Sprinkler risers) 3.3. Masonry Without BulkMasonry Without Bulk 4.4. Concrete Block WallsConcrete Block Walls 5.5. ChimneysChimneys 6.6. Exhaust DuctsExhaust Ducts 1.1. Hand RailsHand Rails 2.2. Stair TreadsStair Treads 3.3. Ladder RungsLadder Rungs 4.4. Wood FramedWood Framed WallsWalls 5.5. Corroded MetalCorroded Metal 6.6. Round RocksRound Rocks 7.7. Trees with shallowTrees with shallow rootsroots
  6. 6. Self-EqualizingSelf-Equalizing Helps to transfer weight of the load.Helps to transfer weight of the load. If one anchor fails thereIf one anchor fails there willwill be a shockbe a shock load.load. Always try to keep the “self-equalizer” asAlways try to keep the “self-equalizer” as short as possible keeping in mind theshort as possible keeping in mind the “critical angles”.“critical angles”.
  7. 7. Self-Equalizing Twist in line prevents webbing from sliding through
  8. 8. Self-EqualizingSelf-Equalizing Self-Equalizer
  9. 9. Angle Leg Tension 170° 1150 % 150° 200 % 120° 100 % 90° 70 % 0° 50 % Critical AnglesCritical Angles
  10. 10. PicketPicket Systems Simple Picket System Windlass
  11. 11. Picket Systems 1. Picket systems are usually made up of three or1. Picket systems are usually made up of three or more evenly spaced stakes driven into themore evenly spaced stakes driven into the ground or snow.ground or snow. 2. The stakes should be positioned in a straight2. The stakes should be positioned in a straight line away from the intended rappelling orline away from the intended rappelling or lowering point.lowering point. 3. They should be spaced approximately one3. They should be spaced approximately one stake length apart.stake length apart.
  12. 12. Picket Systems 4. After the stakes are driven to the ground,4. After the stakes are driven to the ground, secure a length of rope or webbing to thesecure a length of rope or webbing to the base of the picket farthest from the loadbase of the picket farthest from the load and then take 3 to 6 turns around the top ofand then take 3 to 6 turns around the top of the next closest picket, ending with a clovethe next closest picket, ending with a clove hitch on either picket.hitch on either picket. 5. Repeat this lashing from the base of each5. Repeat this lashing from the base of each picket to the top of the next closest picketpicket to the top of the next closest picket to the load.to the load.
  13. 13. Picket SystemsPicket Systems 6. Next place a shorter stake (a CROW-BAR works6. Next place a shorter stake (a CROW-BAR works well) between the the lashings and twist until all ofwell) between the the lashings and twist until all of the slack is out and you are starting to put tension onthe slack is out and you are starting to put tension on the forward picket. (Windlass)the forward picket. (Windlass) 7. Repeat the tensioning process to subsequent7. Repeat the tensioning process to subsequent lashings, working toward the load.lashings, working toward the load. 8. The short stakes used for tensioning should be8. The short stakes used for tensioning should be driven into the ground a short distance to securedriven into the ground a short distance to secure them.them.
  14. 14. Anchor plateAnchor plate * Used to connect the system to the anchor itself Webbing connects to “bombproof” anchor
  15. 15. Anchor plate set-up Load release always in the system Munter Hitch Rack Load Release Haul
  16. 16. RackRack • Used to lower responder to the victim
  17. 17. Load ReleaseLoad Release • Used to release weight of rescuer/victim when prussik knots “lock” onto safety rope • Always in the system (safety)
  18. 18. Rack & Load ReleaseRack & Load Release
  19. 19. Prussick linesPrussick lines • Attach from safety line to load release (always connected in system Line connects to rescuer using “Figure 8”
  20. 20. Completed Lowering Setup
  21. 21. Raise VictimRaise Victim • Remove the rack from the system • Add a munter hitch to the system (opposite side of pulley) • Add the haul (5:1) pulley system
  22. 22. Munter Hitch • Add to the carabineer (far left side on anchor plate) 1 2 3
  23. 23. Munter – second view 3
  24. 24. Haul System completed
  25. 25. Practical Application Go put it all together…

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