Neighboring Food Co-op Association Annual Meeting 2014

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On March 29th, 2014, the Neighboring Food Co-op Association (NFCA) held its Third Annual Meeting, hosted by the Putney Food Co-op in Putney, VT. The gathering, facilitated by David Fowle, Eastern Corridor Advisor for the National Co-op Grocers Association, was attended by over 100 co-operators from more than 35 food co-ops and start-up initiatives from Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont, and over 10 regional and national partner organizations.

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Neighboring Food Co-op Association Annual Meeting 2014

  1. 1. 3rd  Annual  Meeting     29th  March  2014   Putney  School   Putney,  VT  
  2. 2.  Welcome    David  Fowle  (NCGA),  Facilitator    Board  of  Director’s  Report    Glenn  Lower,  Chair    Guest    Roger  Noonan,  President  of  NEFU    Staff  Report    Erbin  Crowell  &  Bonnie  Hudspeth    “Bringing  the  Co-­‐operative  Principles  to  Life”    Lunch  Topic  Tables  &  Networking    Afternoon  Workshops    Election  Results,  Appreciations  &  Evaluation   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   AGENDA  FOR  THE  DAY  
  3. 3. Glenn  Lower     President  &  Chair   of  the  Board     General  Manager   Middlebury  Natural   Foods  Co-­‐op   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   BOARD  OF  DIRECTORS  REPORT  
  4. 4.  Welcome  new  members   from  2013:  Alternative   Food  Co-­‐op  (RI)    …and  new  members  in   2014:  St.  J  Food  Co-­‐op   (VT)  and  North  Quabbin   Community  Co-­‐op  (MA)    Congratulations  to   Monadnock  Food  Co-­‐op   (NH)  on  their  first  year,   coming  up  in  April!    And  welcome  Noah!   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   BOARD  OF  DIRECTORS  REPORT  
  5. 5. Our  Progress     Informal  networking  2004     Middlebury  Manifesto  2007     Shared  Impact  Study  2008     Hired  Erbin  2010     NFCA  incorporated  2011     Hired  Bonnie  2011     Financial  Progress     Total  Assets:  20%  increase     Total  Liabilities:  Down  2.6%     Total  Equity:  Up  36%     NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   BOARD  OF  DIRECTORS  REPORT  
  6. 6. Roger  Noonan,   New  England   Farmers  Union   GUEST  SPEAKER  
  7. 7. Roger  Noonan    President,  New  England   Farmers  Union  (NEFU)    Organic  Famer:   Middlebranch  Farm,   New  Boston,  NH    Local  Harvest  Co-­‐op  CSA    Advocate  for  small   farmers  in  food  safety   policy  dialogs    NEFU  key  NFCA  partner   on  food  system  policy   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   OUR  GUEST  SPEAKER  
  8. 8. A  grass-­‐roots  membership  organiza2on,  commi5ed  to   enhancing  the  economic  sustainability  of  family  farmers,   fishermen,  and  their  communi2es  through  Legisla2on,   Educa2on  and    Co-­‐opera2on   www.newenglandfarmersunion.org  
  9. 9. Overview   •  1,500  members  and  growing   –  Producers,  producer  organiza:ons,   food  co-­‐ops  and  consumers     –  From  all  six  New  England  states   •  Incorporated  in  2009;  the  newest   chapter  of  Na:onal  Farmers  Union   (NFU)     •  Founded  on  the  principles  of   Legisla-on,  Educa-on  and   Coopera-on  
  10. 10. Legisla-on   •  Ar:culate  policy  priori:es  based   on  member  input   •  Organize  annual  legisla:ve  fly-­‐in   to  Washington,  D.C.   •  Engage  producers  and  consumers   to  effec:vely  influence   agricultural  legisla:on   – FSMA  (food  safety)   •  Support  producers  in  state  and   local  issues.  
  11. 11. Our  members  set   our  priori-es   •  Our  2014  priori:es  include:   – Farm  Bill  Implementa:on  and   appropria:ons   – FSMA  (Food  Safety  Moderniza:on   Act)   – Local  and  Regional  Food  System   –   Mandatory  Transparent  Consumer   Labeling  (GMO,  COOL)     – Industrial  Hemp     NEFU  is  a   member-­‐driven   and  member-­‐ supported   organiza7on  
  12. 12. Educa-on   •  NFU  Beginning  Farmer  Ins-tute   –  An  NFU  program  that  helps  beginning   farmers  acquire  leadership  and  farm   management  skills.   •  NFU  Women’s  Conference     –  NFU,  in  partnership  with  Annie’s  Project,   is  helping  women  farmers  enhance  their   farm  knowledge  and  leadership  skills.     •  College  Conference  of  Co-­‐opera-ves   –  An  annual  educa:onal  opportunity  for   your  adults  to  learn  about  co-­‐ops,  hear   from  co-­‐op  leaders  and  visit  co-­‐ opera:ve  enterprises  
  13. 13. Co-­‐opera-on   •  Support  co-­‐opera:ve   endeavors   –  Developed  co-­‐op  resources   –  Value-­‐Added  Producer  Grant   with  Deep  Root  Organic  Co-­‐op   –  Organize  co-­‐opera:ve   educa:onal  opportuni:es   •  Partner  with  Neighboring   Food  Co-­‐op  Associa:on  to   engage  consumers  on  issues   affec:ng  family  farmers  
  14. 14. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   MORNING  BREAK   Thank  you  to  our  partners  for  their  support.  
  15. 15. 2013  activities   &  priorities  for   2014   STAFF  REPORT  
  16. 16. Priorities  for  2013…    Network   Partnerships    Marketing  &   Outreach    Regional  Sourcing    Organizational   Development   …Context:  The  Co-­‐ operative  Decade   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   STAFF  REPORT  
  17. 17.   New  England   Farmers  Union     Cooperative  Fund  of   New  England     Hunger  Free   Vermont     Food  Co-­‐op  Initiative     Cross-­‐Sector  Co-­‐op   Collaboration     Valley  Co-­‐op   Business  Association   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   NETWORK  PARTNERSHIPS  
  18. 18. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   ORGANIC  VALLEY  FARM  TOUR,  2013  
  19. 19. •  Ads  &  Press:  Co-­‐op   Decade  &  Food   Security   •  Materials:  Projects,   Member  Resources   •  Regional  Events:   Integrating  Co-­‐ops   into  the  Dialog   •  Educational   Initiatives:  UMASS   Co-­‐op  Certificate   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   MARKETING  &  OUTREACH  
  20. 20.  Winter  NOFA   Conferences    Co-­‐op  track  at  NOFA   summer  conference    Member  co-­‐op   annual  meetings  and   events    Slow  Living  Summit    “Food  for  Change”   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   REGIONAL  EVENTS  
  21. 21.  Facebook    645  to  874  likes    Promoting  co-­‐op  buzz   and  member  co-­‐ops    Twitter    233  followers    Slideshare    6,300  downloads  —   among  top  5%   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   SOCIAL  MEDIA  
  22. 22.  UMASS  Co-­‐operative   Enterprise  Collaborative    Certificate  in  Applied   Research  in  Co-­‐ operative  Enterprise    Summer  internship   program    2013:  Senior  seminar    2014:  100+  students   enrolled  in  ECON  105:   “Introduction  to  the  Co-­‐ operative  Movement”   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   CO-­‐OPS  IN  THE  CURRICULUM  
  23. 23.  Vision:  Branded,   Regional,  Sustainable,   Scalable,  Co-­‐operative      Cave  to  Co-­‐op:   Promote  &  Grow   Program    Farm  to  Freezer:   Develop,  Expand,   Learn    Future?  Distribution   Model  to  Facilitate   Sourcing   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   REGIONAL  SOURCING  2013  
  24. 24.  2  yr  exploratory  pilot    NCGA  grant  support    13,000  pounds  for   2012-­‐13  season    Challenge:  processing,   price  &  distribution      Collaboration  with   Deep  Root  Organic  Co-­‐ op,  NEFU  to  explore   models  for  future   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   FARM  TO  FREEZER  
  25. 25.  Promote    our   region’s  artisan   cheese  makers    Food  co-­‐ops  as  food   system  partners    Volume  has  doubled   since  2009    28,000  pounds  over   5  years   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   CAVE  TO  CO-­‐OP  
  26. 26. OVERALL  VOLUME    City  Market  /  Onion   River  Co-­‐op  (VT)    Co-­‐op  Food  Stores  /   Hanover  Co-­‐op  (NH,   VT)    Brattleboro  Food   Co-­‐op  (VT)   VOLUME  /  REVENUE    Upper  Valley  Food   Co-­‐op  (VT)    Putney  Food  Co-­‐op   (VT)    Wild  Oats  Co-­‐op   (MA)   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   CAVE  TO  CO-­‐OP  ALL-­‐STARS,  2013  
  27. 27. OVERALL  VOLUME    Co-­‐op  Food  Stores  /   Hanover  Co-­‐op  (NH,   VT)    City  Market  /  Onion   River  Co-­‐op  (VT)    River  Valley  Co-­‐op   Market  (MA)   VOLUME  /  REVENUE    Buffalo  Mountain   Co-­‐op  (VT)    Plainfield  Co-­‐op   (VT)    Upper  Valley  Food   Co-­‐op  (VT)   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   FARM  TO  FREEZER  ALL-­‐STARS,  2013  
  28. 28.  Membership:  From  31  to   34  members    Linkage:  E-­‐news,  Social   media,  outreach,   events,  member   gatherings    Resources:  Dues   supported,  external   grants  &  support    Support:  Peer  to  peer   collaboration  and   partner  support   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   ORGANIZATIONAL  DEVELOPMENT  
  29. 29. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   PEER  TO  PEER  COLLABORATION  
  30. 30. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   FOOD  CO-­‐OPS  &  HEALTHY  FOOD  ACCESS  
  31. 31.  Financially  sustainable  organization    Member  dues  and  supplemental  grant  support    Peer  to  peer  collaboration    Member  trainings,  HFA  and  partner  support    Network  partnerships    Increasing  our  impact,  accessing  resources    Marketing  &  education    Regional  conferences,  UMASS  program      Regional  sourcing    Collaboration  with  Deep  Root  and  NEFU   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   PRIORITIES  FOR  2014  
  32. 32. To  our  members,   our  board  of  directors,     and  our  organizational  partners…     …for  making  this  another  year  of   growth,  success  and  impact  for  the   NFCA,  our  member  co-­‐ops  and  our   vision.   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   THANK  YOU!  
  33. 33. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   QUESTIONS,  FEEDBACK,  IDEAS?  
  34. 34. Small  group   activity  on   the  ICA’s   Guidance   Notes   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   BRINGING     THE  CO-­‐OPERATIVE   PRINCIPLES  TO  LIFE  
  35. 35. By  2020,  co-­‐operative   enterprise  will  be…    The  acknowledged   leader  in  economic,   social  and   environmental   sustainability,    The  business  model   preferred  by  people   around  the  world,    The  fastest  growing   form  of  enterprise.   INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE ALLIANCE BLUEPRINT FOR A CO-OPERATIVE DECADE JANUARY 2013 NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   VISION  FOR  A  CO-­‐OPERATIVE  DECADE  
  36. 36. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   STRATEGY  FOR  A  CO-­‐OPERATIVE  DECADE   Sustainable   Business   Legal   Framework   Co-­‐op   Capital     Member   Participation   Co-­‐operative   Identity  
  37. 37.  Principle  3:  Member  Economic   Participation    Principle  5:  Education,  Training  &   Information    Principle  7:  Concern  for  Community     NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   GUIDANCE  NOTES  ON  THE     CO-­‐OPERATIVE  PRINCIPLES  
  38. 38. Members  contribute  equitably  to,  and   democratically  control,  the  capital  of  their  co-­‐ operative.  At  least  part  of  that  capital  is  usually  the   common  property  of  the  co-­‐operative.  Members   usually  receive  limited  compensation,  if  any,  on   capital  subscribed  as  a  condition  of  membership.   Members  allocate  surpluses  for  any  or  all  of  the   following  purposes:  developing  their  co-­‐operative,   possibly  by  setting  up  reserves,  part  of  which  at   least  would  be  indivisible;  benefiting  members  in   proportion  to  their  transactions  with  the  co-­‐ operative;  and  supporting  other  activities  approved   by  the  membership.   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   MEMBER  ECONOMIC  PARTICIPATION  
  39. 39. Co-­‐operatives  provide  education  and   training  for  their  members,  elected   representatives,  managers,  and   employees  so  they  can  contribute   effectively  to  the  development  of  their   co-­‐operatives.  They  inform  the  general   public  —  particularly  young  people  and   opinion  leaders  —  about  the  nature  and   benefits  of  co-­‐operation.   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   EDUCATION,  TRAINING  &  INFORMATION  
  40. 40. Co-­‐operatives  work  for  the  sustainable   development  of  their  communities   through  policies  approved  by  their   members.   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   CONCERN  FOR  COMMUNITY  
  41. 41. a) What  is  most  important  to  you  about   the  principle  you  are  considering  in   terms  of  what  makes  co-­‐ops  different?   b) What  are  some  of  the  exciting  things   that  your  co-­‐op  is  doing  that  relates  to   the  principle  you  are  considering?   c) What  is  the  NFCA  doing  related  to   these  principles?    What  could  we  do  in   the  future?   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   SMALL  GROUP  DIALOG  
  42. 42. Your  group’s  NUMBER  ONE  Answer:    What  is  most  important  about  this   principle?    What  is  most  exciting  about  what  our   co-­‐ops  are  doing  in  this  area?  (Could   be  an  example  from  a  member  co-­‐op)    What  is  the  NFCA  doing  and  what   could  we  do  in  the  future?   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   SMALL  GROUP  REPORT  OUT  
  43. 43. Dialog  and   member   networking   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   LUNCH:     THANK  YOU,     PUTNEY  FOOD  CO-­‐OP!    
  44. 44. 1)  Operations  Grab   Bag   2)  Truckload  Sales   3)  Cave  to  Co-­‐op  at  5   Years   4)  Planning  a   Successful   Expansion   5)  Supporting  New   Co-­‐ops   6)  Building   Employment   Opportunities   7)  Board  Peer  to  Peer   Learning   8)  CCMA  2015!   9)  Member  Loan   Campaigns   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   LUNCH  TABLES  
  45. 45. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   LUNCH  &  NETWORKING   Thank  you  to  our  partners  for  their  support.  
  46. 46. GMOs,   Healthy  Food   Access,   Membership   Development   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   AFTERNOON   WORKSHOPS  
  47. 47.  GMO  Labeling:  What   Can  Co-­‐ops  Do?      (Class  Room)    Food  Co-­‐ops  &  Healthy   Food  Access    (Meditation  Rm)    Get  over  the  Hump:   Build  Your   Membership   Campaign  to  Scale    (Main  Room)   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   AFTERNOON  WORKSHOPS  
  48. 48. Building a Membership Campaign to Scale Suzi Carter Director of Programs and Partnerships  
  49. 49. What’s this training going to cover? 1.  Introduction to Public Narrative and Organizing 2.  Components of a Membership Recruitment Campaign 3.  Planning your Membership Campaign to Scale
  50. 50. What’s this training going to cover? 1.  Introduction to Public Narrative and Organizing 2.  Components of a Membership Recruitment Campaign 3.  Planning your Membership Campaign to Scale
  51. 51. What’s your experience with member recruitment? How would you describe your experience planning and implementing membership campaigns?   Novice   Beginner   Intermediate   Expert
  52. 52. Why do member campaigns fail?  
  53. 53. Why does this happen? •  Too much information •  Death by leaders •  Didn’t plan •  No training •  Didn’t engage the community •  No momentum •  No systems of accountability •  No rewards •  Lack of communication •  What else?
  54. 54. The secret to successful campaigns?
  55. 55. What if I told you that… Storytelling = More Members ?
  56. 56. Four Cornerstones in Three Stages
  57. 57. LEADERSHIP Taking responsibility for enabling others to achieve shared purpose, in the face of uncertainty
  58. 58. Intro to Public Narrative
  59. 59. What is Public Narrative?"What is Public Narrative?
  60. 60. A princess sends two robots to find a veteran warrior. A farm boy blows up a space station. Storytelling
  61. 61. CHALLENGE" CHOICE" MORAL"
  62. 62. STAGNATION" MOTIVATION" Inertia" Apathy" Fear" Isolation" Self Doubt" URGENCY" ANGER" HOPE" SOLIDARITY" YCMD"
  63. 63. •  Am I inspired by this vision? •  Is the leadership credible? •  Do I have these interests? •  Do I think a co-op will solve them? •  Do I think this team and organization will be able to achieve a new co-op? •  Do I trust and respect the speaker? •  Do I know other people who have joined? •  Am I like the people who have joined? Is this for people like me? •  Do I see the need to join before it opens? •  Will I actually shop at the co-op? •  Am I financially able to join for the full amount? •  Is there an installment plan? •  Do I need to get permission from my spouse first? •  Can I pledge to join? •  Will I be able to afford the food at the co-op? •  Can I learn more about the co-op and team at a meeting, or talking with leadership 1:1? Can I do it?Is it worth it? Your presentation needs to answer these questions!
  64. 64. Why are you starting a co-op? When was the moment of decision? What values motivate you to do this? Where did you learn those values? Growing up? Uncovering the root through dialogueUncovering the root through dialogue
  65. 65. The  name  of  the  game:  Grassroots  Organizing  The Job of the Organizer Identify and recruit the people needed to do the work of starting the co-op, and keep them working together effectively
  66. 66. Intro to Planning a Membership Recruitment Campaign
  67. 67. Membership  growth?   0   100   200   300   400   500   600   Membership growth?
  68. 68. Membership  (fantasy?)   0   100   200   300   400   500   600   Membership (fantasy?)
  69. 69. Membership  plateau   0   100   200   300   400   500   600   Membership plateau
  70. 70. Endowed  Rela:onal  Capacity  Endowed Relational Capacity
  71. 71. Low hanging fruit
  72. 72. Adop:on  curve  Adoption curve
  73. 73. …  vs.  Earned  Rela:onal  Capacity  …vs. Earned Relational Capacity  
  74. 74. In  the  long  run…   0   200   400   600   800   1000   1200   1400   1600   In the long run…
  75. 75. I have the most experience with this part of recruitment: 1)  Identifying goals, strategies and measurement tools 2)  Designing and creating campaign materials/templates 3)  Talking with friends and coworkers about the co-op 4)  Presentations and tabling at community events 5)  Recruiting and managing volunteers 6)  Data management, numbers, quality control
  76. 76. Campaign  planning  graph   Resources  +  Intensity   Time   Campaign Planning Graph
  77. 77. Food  co-­‐op  campaign   Stage  0   Stage  1   Stage  2A   Stage  2B   Stage  3A   Stage  3B,C   Stage  3D   Resources  +  Intensity   Time   Food co-op campaign
  78. 78. Pre-­‐level   Level  1   Level  2   Level  2  PLAN   Level  3   Get  ready  for  opening!   Shihing  to   Opera:ons   Building a Membership Campaign Level  3  PLAN   Level  1  PLAN  
  79. 79. Time to build your own campaign! Fun!  
  80. 80. Campaign  planning  graph  What yours might look like…
  81. 81. Campaign  planning  graph  Color Guide PINK  Membership Goal BLUE  Approach and Strategies ORANGE  Tools and Resources PURPLE  Measurements
  82. 82. One next step! Go  us!  
  83. 83. FoodCoopInitiative.coop Suzi Carter Food Co-op Initiative suzi@fci.coop 540-416-2667 (COOP) More guides, webinars, toolkits, grants, and more available at: Thank you!
  84. 84. Stage 1: Level 1 Recruitment Endowed Relationships Goal: 200-300 members Approach: Friends, family, those closest to steering committee; grassroots feel Strategy: •  Deadline: 6 months (spring or fall of year 1) •  Co-op as the hero: name the problem, present the co-op as the solution •  Invite: you can be the first! •  Attainable goal: With your vision, we can work on feasibility •  Ask/Listen/Follow up: How would you like to be involved?      
  85. 85. Stage 1: Level 1 Recruitment cont’d Activities: •  One-on-ones •  Steering Committee as ambassadors and recruiters •  Phone calls •  Create web presence •  Build email list •  Send regular emails •  Create FAQs •  Have a party! (not a festival)             Tools/Resources: •  Website •  Email template •  Calling script •  How to do a ‘one-on-one’ •  Brochure & generic poster •  Budget •  Member database •  Member prospect tracking tool •  Photos •  Outreach report        
  86. 86. Stage 1: Level 1 Recruitment cont’d Talent: •  8-15 core ambassadors •  1-2 member trackers •  1-2 media updaters                   Budget: •  Printing $ •  Web hosting $ •  Postage $ •  Travel & mileage $ •  Volunteer Appreciation $ •  Computer $ •  Recruitment Training $ •  Office (opt.) $ •  Phone (opt.) $ •  Member Recruitment $ Coordinator (opt.)       Measurement: •  Deadline: 6 months •  35 new members/mo. •  100 1-on-1 contacts/mo. •  At least 2 emails/mo. (30%) •  Daily Fb updates •  100 new Fb Likes/mo.  
  87. 87. Stage 2: Level 2 Earned Relationships Goal: 500-700 members Approach: Build mid-level support from core members’ networks; friends of friends Strategy: •  Deadline: 6 months (fall of year 1 or spring of year 2) •  Co-op as the hero (cont’d) •  Exploring and refining message and image •  Attainable goal: you will help to secure the site! •  Train/Follow Up: building out the snowflake model          
  88. 88. Stage 2: Level 2 Earned Relationships (cont’d) Activities: •  Everything from Level 1 •  Presentations to orgs and small groups •  Private house parties •  Small public events •  Press releases •  Recruit talented core volunteers •  Get your story in others’ communications •  Personal follow-ups with prospect list              
  89. 89. Stage 2: Level 2 Earned Relationships (cont’d) Tools/Resources: •  Everything from Level 1 •  Event in a bag •  How To templates •  Inexpensive swag •  PR templates (story, event) •  House party toolkit •  Formalized thank you process •  Volunteer member recruitment training           •  PowerPoint template •  Invitations template to events •  Co+op video, poster, recipes •  Thermometer graphic (sign?) •  Photos of other co-ops •  “I’m a member because” •  Tabling Like a Pro •  Write up of your co-op            
  90. 90. Stage 2: Level 2 Earned Relationships (cont’d) Talent: •  Everyone from Level 1 •  Paid outreach/member recruitment coordinator •  Private parties coordinator •  Small events Coordinator •  General volunteer coordinator •  Presentations coordinator •  PR/Media Team (1-4 people) •  Photographers (on-call pipeline)              
  91. 91. Stage 2: Level 2 Earned Relationships (cont’d) Budget: •  Printing $ •  Web hosting $ •  Postage $ •  Travel & mileage $ •  Volunteer Appreciation $ •  Computer $ •  Recruitment Training $ •  Office $ •  Phone $ •  Memb. Recr. Crdtr. $ •  Promo (electronic) $ •  Parties $         Measurement: •  Deadline: 6 months •  65 new members/mo. •  10 house parties/mo. •  1 event/wk. •  1-2 presentations/wk. •  At least 2 emails/mo. •  1-2 Fb posts/day •  1 mass media coverage/wk. •  At least 15 core volunteers by kickoff      
  92. 92. Stage 3: Level 3 Leveraging the 500-700 Goal: 700-1,200 members Approach: Building on the reciprocators networks; people you don’t know and late adopter friends of members Strategy: •  Deadline: 6 months (prioritize spring and fall) •  Professionalizing all that has been built; less labor intensive •  We’re strong and this is really happening! Join before the store opens! •  Store as ‘carrot’ •  Mass media as best friends      
  93. 93. Stage 3: Level 3 Leveraging the 500-700 Activities: •  Everything from Level 1 and 2 •  Include membership message with Member Loan Campaign •  Small public events •  Participation in larger community events •  Telling confident story of success •  Enhanced communications, refined voice; regular press releases •  Brand all materials, photos •  Update website and brochure(s) with store and shopping •  Site tours monthly with ownership message •  Be more selective with presentations •  Email and social media updates •  Canvassing to surrounding communities and residents    
  94. 94. Stage 3: Level 3 Leveraging the 500-700 (cont’d) Tools/Resources: •  Everything from Level 1 and 2 •  Updated PowerPoint presentation •  Store/site renderings •  “How to” store tour templates •  Press release template for story and event •  “Hey Neighbor!” packets •  New pro logo/brand kit*           Talent: •  Everyone from Level 1 and 2 •  3 trained tour guides •  Site tour coordinator •  Photographer (on-call list) •  2-3 one-on-one follow up volunteers •  1 media writer •  1-3 bloggers •  1-3 social media volunteers          
  95. 95. Stage 3: Level 3 Leveraging the 500-700 (cont’d) Budget: •  Printing $ •  Web hosting $ •  Postage $ •  Travel & mileage $ •  Volunteer Appreciation $ •  Office $ •  Phone $ •  Memb. Recr. Crdtr. $ •  Site Tours $ •  Sponsorships $             Measurement: •  Deadline: 4 months •  80 new members/mo. •  1 site tour/mo. with goal of 100 people at each •  1 mass media coverage/wk. •  3-4 presentations/mo.* •  10 Fb posts/wk. minimum •  20 follow up calls/wk. •  1 email/wk.        
  96. 96. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   WRAP  UP   Thank  you  to  our  partners  for  their  support.  
  97. 97. Our  candidates    Ed  King,  General  Manager,  Littleton  Food   Co-­‐op  (NH)    Kay  Litten,  Board  of  Directors,  Co-­‐op  Food   Stores  /  Hanover  Consumer  Co-­‐op  (NH,  VT)    Suzette  Snow-­‐Cobb,  Marketing  &   Membership  Manager,  Franklin  Community   Co-­‐op  (MA)    Joanne  Todd,  Board  of  Directors,   Willimantic  Food  Co-­‐op  (CT)   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   BOARD  ELECTIONS  RESULTS  
  98. 98. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   THANK  YOU,  ROBYN!  
  99. 99.  Meeting  highlights    Please  fill  out  a  meeting  evaluation   form  and  leave  it  at  registration    Save  the  Date!  NFCA  Fall   Membership  Gathering,  27th  Sept   2014   NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   EVALUATIONS  &  SAVE  THE  DATE  
  100. 100. NFCA  Annual  Meeting,  2014   THANK  YOU!   Thank  you  to  our  partners  for  their  support.  

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