Giesbrecht "Submersion Improved Emergency Response"- NDPA Symposium 2012

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Giesbrecht "Submersion Improved Emergency Response"- NDPA Symposium 2012

  1. 1. Improved Emergency Response toReduce Vehicle Submersion DrowningGordon Giesbrecht, PhDGerren McDonald, MScUniversity of Manitoba Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  2. 2. The Problem  Deaths in submersed vehicles, 350-400/yr  ~10% of all drownings in vehicles  Highest fatality rate of any single-vehicle accident  Death often due to improper actions  Poor public understanding  Complete submersion and filling 2-3 minutes  “Window” of opportunity for escape only 1 minute Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  3. 3. This is what is being taught ... Igrew up (many years ago) in Florida and we were taught to stay in the car with the windows up and wait for the air bubble and then open door and leave. Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  4. 4. 3 Stages of vehicle submersionFloatation (30-120 sec) – Before water reaches bottom of side window – Ample time to exit via window – Do not open the doorSinking – Vehicle tilts forward – Water above the window – Higher level than inside – Impossible to open anythingSubmerged – Vehicle full of water – Doors and windows easily opened – Unfortunately you are probably dead Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  5. 5. Everyone’s natural responseThe Cell Phone Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  6. 6. Rescue Sling and Rope Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  7. 7. Now hear this!If your vehicle ends up in the water… And you touch your cell phone… You will probably die!!! Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  8. 8. Bottom Line DO NOT TOUCH YOUR CELL PHONE SEATBELTS off WINDOWS open or break (back is better) (CHILDREN) start with the oldest OUT Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  9. 9. Electric windows will work only for a short period of time (seconds?) Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  10. 10. Center Punches  Willbreak side windows effectively  Should be visible and within driver s reach  Preferably mounted Res-Q-Me Center Punch Photos courtesy Trevor Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba Free Press Gordon Hagan, Winnipeg
  11. 11. Res-Q-Me Center PunchGordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  12. 12. Two parallel tracks to save lives1. Public education 2. Emergency Dispatch Proposed strategyNo cell phones Current strategy Location (brief attempt) Location Focus on self rescueSeatbelts Seatbelts (undo locks)Windows Personal Windows (move to back)Children Information (break/kick, location)Open Send help Children (older first) Publication Out (immediately)Education products Stay calm until Media help arrives Prepare for the worst Policy Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba Protocols
  13. 13. What is your emergency? Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  14. 14. Help caller control own destiny Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  15. 15. Be specific - how to break window Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  16. 16. Last gasp effort Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba
  17. 17.  DO NOT TOUCH YOUR CELL PHONE SEATBELTS off WINDOWS open or break (back is better) (CHILDREN) start with the oldest OUT Emergency Dispatch Tell them what to do !!! Gordon Giesbrecht, University of Manitoba

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