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PM1: Open sourcing – using digital channels to make policy collaboratively

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Presented on Tuesday 6 September at NCVO Campaigning Conference 2016.

Peter Bryant, Head of Learning Technology and Innovation, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tim Hughes, Open Government Programme Manager, Involve
Nick Davies, Public Services Manager, NCVO (chair)

If you would like to find out more about our training and events, visit our website at https://www.ncvo.org.uk/training-and-events.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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PM1: Open sourcing – using digital channels to make policy collaboratively

  1. 1. Exhibitors: Sponsor: OPEN SOURCING – USING DIGITAL CHANNELS TO MAKE POLICY COLLABORATIVELY CHAIR: NICK DAVIES PUBLIC SERVICES MANAGER, NCVO SPEAKERS: PETER BRYANT HEAD OF LEARNING TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION, LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE TIM HUGHES OPEN GOVERNMENT PROGRAMME MANAGER, INVOLVE
  2. 2. Hacking the UK Constitution Peter Bryant @peterbryantHE Head of Learning Technology and Innovation London School of Economics and Political Science, UK Crowdsourcing democracy and learning in a messy, fragmented world
  3. 3. The PROPOSITION • Deliver a written constitution that was crowd sourced by a representative community • Ensure that it clearly represented the will of the people • Do it before the May 2015 election • Make sure it was civil and engaging • Provide an educational experience that did not look like or work like a course in constitutional law
  4. 4. THE CHALLENGE #1
  5. 5. BUILDING A COHESIVE COMMUNITY
  6. 6. ‘…it’s through participation in communities that deep learning occurs. People don’t learn to become physicists by memorizing formulas; rather it’s the implicit practices that matter most. Indeed, knowing only the explicit, mouthing the formulas, is exactly what gives an outsider away. Insiders know more. By coming to inhabit the relevant community, they get to know not just the “standard” answers, but the real questions, sensibilities, and aesthetics, and why they matter.’ BROWN, J. S. Learning in the digital age
  7. 7. THE CHALLENGE #2
  8. 8. Modern pedagogy/ civic engagement is often… SEQUENTIAL SCAFFOLDED ALIGNED STRUCTURED STRATIFIED
  9. 9. LEARNING EXPERIENCING LIVING ACQUIRING CONNECTING RARELY ARE LEARNING SHARINGCONNECTING CHANGING
  10. 10. What if Informal Community led Non-linear Democratic Problem solving Collaborative Chaotic Aspirational Emancipatory Open engagement couldbe…
  11. 11. ALL AT A MASSIVE SCALE
  12. 12. USING SOCIAL MEDIA
  13. 13. Combination of learning approaches Integrating participatory practices Engaged individuals and groups No readings, no course, No lecturer, no teacher, maybe a guru No sequence, enter at any time Learning was an expectation Learning through practice, debate and citizenship What we built https://www.flickr.com/photos/leolondon/451273331
  14. 14. Where we finished over 1500 users; over 725 idea submissions; over 125000 idea views; over 10000 comments; over 25000 votes cast; an 8500 word constitution; from more than 1m words written. Over 75% learnt something and 88&% were influenced by the community Participation went up across the project not DOWN https://www.flickr.com/photos/stephen_downes/1470015134
  15. 15. RE-DEFINING MASSIVE IMPACT RIPPLE POWER OF ANALYSIS EXPERIENCE
  16. 16. https://www.flickr.com/photos/balleyne/2668834386 RE-DEFINING OPEN OPEN ACCESS OPEN PARTICIPATION OPEN ACADEMY OPEN ENGAGEMENT
  17. 17. RE-THINKING PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION AUTHORITY FLEETING CONNECTIONS IDEATION HACKING
  18. 18. ‘Social media has facilitated a complex, co-created and immediate form of learning response, where content and openness challenge the closed, structured nature of modern higher education. Social media has had significant impacts on the way learners connect with people and with the knowledge they require in order to learn across a variety of contexts. Social media support more than user interactivity, they support the development and application of user-generated content, collaborative learning, network formation, critical inquiry, relationship building, information literacy, dynamic searching and reflection.’ BRYANT, PETER (2015) Disrupting how we ‘do’ on-line learning through social media: a case study of the crowdsourcing the UK constitution project.
  19. 19. What happens when you empower a community to learn and engage in social change? Does this build an informed digital citizenry? Can this be more than civic engagement? Problem solving, capacity development or change? And that’s what is next…
  20. 20. Developing the… …and… 2016-18 Open Government Action Plan NCVO Campaigning Conference 6 September 2016
  21. 21. www.opengovernment.org.uk
  22. 22. forum.opengovernment.org.uk
  23. 23. 79 ideas 28 proposals 8 workshops 250+ contributions
  24. 24. www.opengovmanifesto.org.uk
  25. 25. www.opengovernment.org.uk/resource/terms-of-reference-of-the-uk-open- government-network/
  26. 26. Tips 1. Have a clear process 2. Leave some flexibility for changing circumstances 3. Combine online and offline 4. Apply the rule of thumb for internet culture

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