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AM3: How to build a campaign coalition and make it last

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Presented on Tuesday 6 September at NCVO Campaigning Conference 2016.

Heather Kennedy, Campaign Manager, Quaker Social Action
Jane Cox, Director, Principle Consulting
Tom Baker, Head of Campaigns and Engagement, Bond (chair)

If you would like to find out more about our training and events, visit our website at https://www.ncvo.org.uk/training-and-events.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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AM3: How to build a campaign coalition and make it last

  1. 1. Exhibitors: Sponsor: HOW TO BUILD A CAMPAIGN COALITION AND MAKE IT LAST CHAIR: TOM BAKER HEAD OF CAMPAIGNS AND ENGAGEMENT, BOND SPEAKERS: HEATHER KENNEDY CAMPAIGN MANAGER, QUAKER SOCIAL ACTION JANE COX DIRECTOR, PRINCIPLE CONSULTING
  2. 2. How to build a campaign coalition and make it last NCVO Campaigning Conference 2016
  3. 3. Why build a coalition?
  4. 4. Case studies
  5. 5. Coalition structures Partnership Collaborative Flotilla Secretariat-led
  6. 6. What works?  Clearly defined goal that all coalition members are in agreement with  Analysis of strengths of coalition members and play to these, and make the most of unusual suspects  An agreed coalition and decision making structure can aid leadership and trust  Insightful and nimble political strategy – making most of context, timings, opportunities  Shared ownership of decisions and achievements  Balance, diplomacy and good-will  Build momentum, energy and action – enjoy it!
  7. 7. Dispatches from the frontline: Coalition frustrations “One thing I’ve learnt the hard way, plan additional capacity to cope with working in partnership. The simple fact of working with others will create an additional layer of work.“ “Years ago at Oxfam I remember trying to get sign-off in a coalition on a refugee manifesto before the 2001 General Election. At the eleventh hour, I thought I had got agreement – but then an email came in from one of the coalition asking for a greater focus on children. Despite my enthusiasm for this initiative – I knew then that this manifesto was not going to happen – and it didn’t! So no matter how simple – it will always take longer than you think!” “Vastly different theories of change can be difficult to navigate. Some times some organisations shouldn't be let in - we let in some organisations to our current coalition and they just moan and chunter and do nothing.” “Can lower ambition. You end up by inertia, or ”our organisation can't say that" so dropping things.”
  8. 8. Dispatches from the frontline: Best things about coalitions “Coalition work can leave me frazzled but it is immensely satisfying knowing we’re singing from the same hymn sheet when we successfully come together.” “Change only really happens when organisations or groups come together, ideally from different sectors, with a common vision of both the problem and the solution and then push for change in a sustained way. This is one way in which campaigning is different to marketing – here we are focused on the external change we want as opposed to just promoting our own organisation. All of us campaigners need to be aware of that despite the internal pressure to do differently!” “Helps you see different perspectives. We work a lot with UN agencies who see the world totally differently. Equally, some grass roots charities really energise me with their passion.”
  9. 9. Jane Cox jane@principleconsulting.org.uk www.principleconsulting.org.uk

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