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Peer-to-Peer Webinar Series: Success Stories in EIDM 2018 / Webinar #1

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There are many examples of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) among public health professionals and organizations in Canada. However, there are limited mechanisms in place to facilitate the sharing of these stories within the public health community. The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT) seeks to address this gap with an interactive, peer-led webinar series featuring a collection of EIDM success stories in public health.

These success stories will illustrate what EIDM in public health practice, programs and policy looks like across the country.

Join us to engage with public health practitioners across Canada as they share their success stories of using or implementing EIDM in the real world. Learn about the strategies and tools used by presenters to improve the use of evidence.

Building a cultural foundation for EIDM: An evaluative thinking communications campaign
Kristin Beaton, Huron County Health Unit
In an effort to build evaluation and evidence-informed decision making capacity, Huron County Health Unit has implemented several strategies to encourage evaluative thinking. Learn more about how this health unit built a learning organizational culture.

Testing integrated knowledge translation processes to improve the participation of children with disabilities in leisure activities in British Columbia
Dr. Ebele Mogo and Dr. Keiko Shikako-Thomas, McGill University
To improve policies on physical activity promotion for people with disabilities, this team undertook a project to bridge the evidence to policy gap. Learn more about how a community forum and policy dialogue were used to help bridge this gap and inform policymakers about evidence.

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Peer-to-Peer Webinar Series: Success Stories in EIDM 2018 / Webinar #1

  1. 1. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Peer-to-Peer Webinar: Success Stories in EIDM Webinar 1 - Featuring: Building a cultural foundation for EIDM: An evaluative thinking communications campaign Kristin Beaton, Huron County Health Unit Testing integrated knowledge translation processes to improve the participation of children with disabilities in leisure activities in British Columbia Dr. Ebele Mogo and Dr. Keiko Shikako-Thomas, McGill University October 23, 2018 1:00 – 2:30 PM EDT
  2. 2. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 2 Housekeeping Use Chat to post comments and/or questions during the webinar • ‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Connection issues • Recommend using a wired Internet connection (vs. wireless), • WebEx 24/7 help line • 1-866-229-3239 Participant Side Panel in WebEx Chat
  3. 3. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 3 After Today Presentation slides (in English and French) and a video recording (in English) will be posted. These resources will be available at: http://www.nccmt.ca/capacity- development/webinars/previous-webinars
  4. 4. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 4 How many people are watching today’s session with you? Poll Question #1 a. Just me b. 1-3 c. 4-5 d. 6-10 e. >10
  5. 5. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 5
  6. 6. NCC Infectious Diseases Winnipeg, MB NCC Methods and Tools Hamilton, ON NCC Healthy Public Policy Montreal, QC NCC Determinants of Health Antigonish, NS NCC Aboriginal Health Prince George, BC NCC Environmental Health Vancouver, BC 6
  7. 7. Registry of Methods and Tools Online Learning Opportunities WorkshopsVideo Series Public Health+ Networking and Outreach NCCMT Products and Services 7
  8. 8. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo The EIDM Casebook • Collection of success stories in public health • Available at http://www.nccmt.ca/impa ct/eidm-casebook 8
  9. 9. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 9 Presenter Kristin Beaton, MPH Huron County Health Unit
  10. 10. Building a cultural foundation for EIDM: An evaluative thinking communications campaign NCCMT Peer-to-peer webinar series October 23, 2018
  11. 11. “Evaluative thinking is critical thinking applied in the context of evaluation, motivated by an attitude of inquisitiveness and a belief in the value of evidence…” -Buckley, Archibald, Hargraves and Trochim (2015)
  12. 12. “Evaluation is an activity. Evaluative Thinking is a way of doing business.” -Michael Quinn Patton (2014)
  13. 13. Campaign Key Messages: • Evaluative Thinking is critical, actionable and happens anytime. • Evaluative Thinking can help improve our programs, services and culture. • It’s easy to add more Evaluative Thinking into your everyday work.
  14. 14. Process measures • Participation: – 94% of staff participated in some way – 89% participated in at least 1 workshop – 41% submitted a completed ET BINGO card • Intranet analytics: – 277 content site visits – 255 blog post visits – 17 comments
  15. 15. Outcome measures • Evaluative Thinking Inventory: – Increase in working knowledge of ET – 8 of 13 skill-related dimensions increased – 5 of 6 value-related dimensions increased • Campaign take home messages: – Take different perspectives – Evidence informed action – Ask tough questions
  16. 16. Management feedback “The campaign brought visibility to what is already being done by staff” “…have noticed more questions being asked by staff during meetings…” “Would like tangible tools to use some of the skills taught” “Campaign was too short to shift organizational culture” “Need to have a plan for how to continue to communicate this work to staff”
  17. 17. Key Success Factors • External pressure • Strong management support • Intranet • “Go with the flow”
  18. 18. Lessons Learned • Workl0ad continues to be a barrier • Need to understand different public health roles • Culture change doesn’t happen overnight
  19. 19. Next steps…
  20. 20. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 33 Your Comments/Questions • Use Chat to post comments and/or questions • ‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Chat Participant Side Panel in WebEx
  21. 21. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 34 Presenters Dr. Ebele Mogo, DrPH McGill University Dr. Keiko Shikako-Thomas, PhD, OT McGill University
  22. 22. Testing integrated knowledge translation processes to improve the participation of children with disabilities in physical activity in British Columbia
  23. 23. Ebele Mọgọ, DrPH Post-doctoral Researcher, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University Keiko Shikako-Thomas, PhD, OT Canada Research Chair in Childhood Disability: Participation and Knowledge Translation. Assistant Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Associate Member McGill Institute of Health and Social Policy Annette Majnemer, PhD, OT Professor, Vice-Dean of Education, Faculty of Medicine, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy McGill University Jonathan Lai, PhD Post-doctoral Researcher and CIHR Health System Impact Fellow, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University Te a m
  24. 24. Background and Rationale • 4.6% of Canadian children and youth have an identified sensory, cognitive, physical or developmental disability1 4.60% 95.40% • In British Columbia alone, about 15% of the population (over 500,000 people) identify as having a disability2 15 % • Children with disabilities in Canada face major systemic challenges to participation (structural, information, attitudes) • There is research evidence that identifies the barriers and possible solutions to promote participation • This research is typically not available to those with the necessary power to create recreational opportunities for these children
  25. 25. Improving the methods for engaging community and research partners in discussing evidence-based solutions related to leisure promotion for children with disabilities 1 Conveying research information and stakeholders’ opinions about participation in leisure and tailoring to policy makers2 Opportunities for Impact Testing knowledge translation to policy interventions.3
  26. 26. Initiative To use a policy dialogue to bridge the evidence to policy gap.
  27. 27. 1 Disseminate research-based information on leisure participation for children with disabilities to decision-makers 2 Inform how researchers could work better with policy makers Objectives of the Policy Dialogue 3 Gather stakeholders to discuss strategies that promote participation for children with disabilities in BC.
  28. 28. • Grassroots organizations: • share successful strategies to promote participation for children with disabilities • identify existing policy frameworks and evidence gaps • prioritize constructs within their chosen framework (The National Recreation Framework) • identify potential policymakers who could be interested and affect changes • Conducted a systematic Rapid Review of the research literature on community- based and policy interventions promoting: inclusion, access, capacity building • Developed a targeted policy brief based on stakeholders preferred formats for receiving information (qualitative or quantitative) Before the dialogue
  29. 29. At the dialogue • Researchers presented: • Current research on children with disabilities and participation • Participants discussed: • implementation considerations • possible solutions to overcome barriers to participation • Presented the Jooay App - previously chosen by stakeholders as a solution - a listing of adaptive and inclusive leisure activities across Canada
  30. 30. Post-dialogue Evaluation: Interview + Survey 34% of participants were from the provincial government. Other sectors represented included the school board, the municipal government, and NGOs. 67 % had experience working with people with disabilities. had a post- graduate degree had a bachelors’ degree. 93 % 33 %
  31. 31. Interviewees By Sector 8% 25% 17%17% 8% 25% Family & Children Non-Profit Political Leader Recreation Education Health Individual interviews with participants post- dialogue
  32. 32. Interviews - Results • What were your initial perceptions of the policy brief? • What did you think of the dialogue? • What was your perception of other participants? • Do you think the culture at your organization is conducive to influencing policy? Interview Questions
  33. 33. Interviews - Results Perception of the policy brief and intent to use the information in the next six months - Participants understood the policy brief and planned to use the information in content creation, planning and leadership training within their organizations Perception of the policy dialogue - Participants found the policy dialogue useful for networking though would have wanted a greater focus on action. Interview Themes
  34. 34. Interviews - Results Perceptions of other participants - Participants perceived other participants to be smart, articulate and worth collaborating with in the future. - Opined that it would have been useful to discuss real-life applications of the dialogue with other participants. Perceptions of efficacy to effect change - This depended on their position in their organization as well as the organization’s proximity to upstream policy decision making. Interview Themes
  35. 35. Lessons Learned From The Process • Knowledge translation should be active - include opportunities for engaging with research evidence and integrating the context- specific information acquired from stakeholders. • “Customer service” can make or break participation • Limited funding, staff turnover and capacity gaps hinder use of evidence-based information. • Known barriers to “evidence” translation and use: staff attitudes, human resources, financial resources, language, culture and location
  36. 36. Recommendations • Ensure greater inclusion of marginalized voices (people with disabilities, rural and Indigenous communities) in future policy dialogues • Participation may require incentives • Accessibility of location for knowledge translation activities • Consider strategies prior to dialogue for longitudinal follow- up post dialogue
  37. 37. Recommendations • Align program goal and content to participants • e.g. frontline workers versus policy maker versus program managers versus NGOs • Set clear and actionable outcome expectations e.g. networking versus knowledge exchange versus policy change • Gauge participants’ expectations in participating prior to the dialogue
  38. 38. Future Directions • Assess knowledge use 6 months post dialogue • Aggregate learnings from dialogues in different provinces • Assess participation and specific barriers and facilitators related to: location, socioeconomic factors, and behavioral factors • Validate a tool for knowledge use and behavior change by policymakers (in development)
  39. 39. REFERENCES 1. Bassett-Gunter, R. L., Ruscitti, R. J., Latimer-Cheung, A. E., & Fraser-Thomas, J. L. (2017). Targeted physical activity messages for parents of children with disabilities: A qualitative investigation of parents' informational needs and preferences. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 64, 37-46. 2. Accessibility 2024 - Province of British Columbia. (2017). www2.gov.bc.ca. Retrieved 2 November 2017, from https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/governments/about-the-bc- government/accessibility 3. Leveling the playing field: A natural progression from playground to podium for Canadians with disabilities. (2017). Senate of Canada. Retrieved 2 November 2017, from https://sencanada.ca/content/sen/committee/411/ridr/rep/rep07jun12-e.pdf 4. Shikako-Thomas, K., Majnemer, A., Mogo, E. M., Lai, J., & Kalaba, M. (n.d.). Childhood Disability Link. Retrieved from Promoting the participation of children with disabilities in Leisure Activities: https://www.childhooddisability.ca/wp- content/uploads/2017/12/researchbrief_dec20.pdf
  40. 40. This project was funded by: • Edith Strauss Foundation • Government of Canada – Economic and Social Development • Research Assistance: • Icoquih Badillo
  41. 41. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 54 Your Comments/Questions • Use Chat to post comments and/or questions • ‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Chat Participant Side Panel in WebEx
  42. 42. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Share your story! • Are you using EIDM in your practice? We want to hear about it! • Email us: nccmt@mcmaster.ca • Need support for EIDM? Contact us for help! • Email us: nccmt@mcmaster.ca • We typically respond within 24 business hours 55
  43. 43. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 56 Your Feedback is Important Please take a few minutes to share your thoughts on today’s webinar. Your comments and suggestions help to improve the resources we offer and plan future webinars. The short survey is available at: https://surveys.mcmaster.ca/limesurvey/index.php/288818? lang=en
  44. 44. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 57 Join us for our next webinar Webinar 2 - Featuring: Sharing health information with community organizations to promote health equity Dr. M. Mustafa Hirji and Cassandra Ogunniyi, Niagara Region Public Health & Emergency Services Putting research in place: An innovative approach to decision support in Newfoundland and Labrador Dr. Stephen Bornstein and Rochelle Baker, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research Date: November 28, 2018 Time: 1:00 – 2:30pm EST Register at: https://health-evidence.webex.com/health- evidence/onstage/g.php?MTID=ebe6a03e93566ef431d09c5078eca a2df
  45. 45. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Webinar Series from NCCMT http://www.nccmt.ca/capacity-development/webinars • Spotlight on Methods and Tools • Topic-Specific Methods and Tools • Online Journal Club • Peer-to-peer Webinars 58
  46. 46. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada | Affiliated with McMaster University Production of this presentation has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada.. For more information about the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools: NCCMT website www.nccmt.ca Contact: nccmt@mcmaster.ca

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