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NCCMT Webinar - Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook

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The Contextualizing Guidance Workbook can help you consider factors from the broader health system and political system so you make the most appropriate policy recommendations and decisions. Find out how this tool can help you apply recommendations from a guidance document to address the issue/problem in your local context:
View our summary of this resource here: http://www.nccmt.ca/resources/search/238

NCCMT is one of six NCCs for Public Healthh in Canada More on the NCCs at www.nccph.ca Production of this webinar has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

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NCCMT Webinar - Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook

  1. 1. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada | Affiliated with McMaster University Production of this presentation has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada.. Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook Presenter: Elizabeth Alvarez MD, MPH, CCFP, ABFM, PhD(c) March 9, 2016 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET
  2. 2. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Use Q&A to post comments / questions during the webinar • ‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Connection issues • Recommend using a wired Internet connection (vs. wireless), • WebEx 24/7 help line • 1-866-229-3239 Housekeeping 2 Q&A Participant Side Panel in WebEx
  3. 3. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo After Today The PowerPoint presentation (in English and French) and English audio recording will be made available. These resources are available at: PowerPoint: http://www.slideshare.net/NCCMT/ Audio Recording: https://www.youtube.com/user/nccmt/videos 3
  4. 4. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Poll Question #1 How many people are watching today’s session with you? 1. Just me 2. 2 to 3 3.4 to 5 4. More than 5 4
  5. 5. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Your profession? Put a √ on your answer (or RSVP via email) / Epidemiologist Management (director, supervisor, etc.) Allied health professionals (nurse, dietician, dental hygenist, etc.) Librarian Physician / Dentist Other 5
  6. 6. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook http://www.nccmt.ca/resources/search/238 Episode 23 6
  7. 7. Poll Question #2 Where are you from? 1. BC 2. AB 3. SK 4. MB 5. ON 6. QC 7. NB 8. NS 9. PEI 10. NL 11. YK 11. NWT 12. NU 13. Outside Canada 7
  8. 8. NCC Infectious Diseases Winnipeg, MB NCC Methods and Tools Hamilton, ON NCC Healthy Public Policy Montreal, QC NCC Determinants of Health Antigonish, NS NCC Aboriginal Health Prince George, BC NCC Environmental Health Vancouver, BC 8
  9. 9. Registry of Methods and Tools Online Learning Opportunities WorkshopsMultimedia Public Health+ Networking and Outreach NCCMT Products and Services 9
  10. 10. Poll Question #3 What sector are you from? 1. Public Health Practitioner 2. Health Practitioner (Other) 3. Education 4. Research 5. Provincial/Territorial/Government/Ministry 6. Municipality 7. Policy Analyst (NGO, etc.) 8. Other 10
  11. 11. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Elizabeth Alvarez, MD, MPH, CCFP, ABFM, PhD(c) Family Medicine Public Health, Administration Health Policy, Political Studies Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar Presenter 11
  12. 12. CONTEXTUALIZING GUIDANCE WORKBOOK NCCMT WEBINAR MARCH 9, 2016 ELIZABETH ALVAREZ, MD, MPH, PHD(C) JOHN LAVIS, MD, MSC, PHD
  13. 13. KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION • Many terms – knowledge transfer, knowledge exchange, knowledge brokering • “Knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) is an interactive process involving the interchange of knowledge between research users and researcher producers” (Mitton et al, 2007)
  14. 14. BACKGROUND • Fragmented and overburdened public health systems • Unused / underutilized effective public health interventions • Global, evidence-based guidance can be used to strengthen public health systems (Bosch-Capblanch et al, 2012)
  15. 15. BACKGROUND • Need to contextualize global guidance with national or local evidence and health system and political system assessments (Lavis et al, 2012) • Clear direction from countries for need to have more support in implementing global guidance recommendations • Countries requesting such support from WHO • International forum on evidence-informed health policymaking in low and middle-income countries, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Aug 2012
  16. 16. CONTEXTUALIZING GUIDANCE WORKBOOK A systematic, transparent, and user-friendly tool - a workbook to help develop national or subnational policy recommendations or policy decisions Meshes global guidance and national or local evidence Includes broader health system and broader political system factors http://optimizemnh.org/Annexes/Annex_8_Contextualizing_Workbook.pdf
  17. 17. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Poll Question #4 How familiar are you with the Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook? A. I am not familiar with the Workbook. B. I have heard of the Workbook. C. I have used the Workbook. 17
  18. 18. Health systems guidance contextualization framework STEP 1 •Clarify the problem STEP 2 •Frame the options STEP 3 •Identify implementation considerations STEP 4 •Consider the broader health system context STEP 5 •Consider the broader political system context STEP 6 •Refine the statement of the problem, options and implementation considerations in light of health system and political system factors STEP 7 •Anticipate monitoring and evaluation needs STEP 8 •Make policy recommendations or decisions
  19. 19. STEP 1 – CLARIFY THE PROBLEM 1) What is the problem? a) a risk factor, disease or condition; b) the programmes, services or drugs currently being used to address a risk factor, disease, or condition; c) current health system arrangements, including delivery, financial and governance arrangements; or d) the current degree of implementation of an agreed upon course of action; 2) How did the problem come to attention, and has this process influenced the prospect of it being addressed, in addition to the guidance?; 3) What indicators can be used or collected to establish the magnitude of the problem and to measure progress in addressing it?; 4) What comparisons can be made to establish the magnitude of the problem and to measure progress in addressing it?; 5) How can the problem be framed (or described) in a way that will motivate different groups?
  20. 20. STEP 2 – FRAME THE OPTIONS 1) Has an appropriate set of options been identified to address the problem?; 2) What benefits are important to those who will be affected and which benefits are likely to be achieved with each option?; 3) What harms are important to those who will be affected, which harms are likely to arise with each option and how can these harms be mitigated? 4) What are the local costs of each option, and is there local evidence about their cost-effectiveness?; 5) What adaptations might be made to any given option and how might they alter its benefits, harms and costs? 6) Which stakeholder’s views and experiences might influence the acceptability of each option and its benefits, harms and costs?
  21. 21. STEP 3 – IDENTIFY IMPLEMENTATION CONSIDERATIONS 1) What are the potential barriers to the successful implementation of each option?; 2) What strategies should be considered in order to facilitate the necessary behavioural changes among healthcare recipients/citizens?; 3) What strategies should be considered in order to facilitate the necessary behavioural changes among healthcare professionals?; 4) What strategies should be considered in order to facilitate the necessary organizational changes?; 5) What strategies should be considered in order to facilitate the necessary system changes?
  22. 22. STEP 4 – CONSIDER THE BROADER HEALTH SYSTEM CONTEXT 1) How do delivery arrangements influence the possibility of each option being adopted and implemented successfully?; 2) How do financial arrangements influence the possibility of each option being adopted and implemented successfully?; 3) How do governance arrangements influence the possibility of each option being adopted and implemented successfully?
  23. 23. STEP 5 – CONSIDER THE BROADER POLITICAL SYSTEM CONTEXT 1) Would current political institutions allow for or hinder each policy change?; 2) Which politically active group(s) might have an interest in (face concentrated or diffuse costs or benefits) and mobilize for or against each option?; 3) Does each option resonate with the beliefs and values of the government and the public? Is there any local research evidence on stakeholder’s views and experiences?; 4) Are there external factors which may press the issue forward or draw attention away from each option?
  24. 24. STEP 6 - REFINE THE STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM, OPTIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION CONSIDERATIONS IN LIGHT OF HEALTH SYSTEM AND POLITICAL SYSTEM FACTORS
  25. 25. STEP 7 – ANTICIPATE MONITORING AND EVALUATION NEEDS 1) Is monitoring necessary?; Is monitoring already in place or are new systems necessary? What are the costs of establishing a new system? Are findings going to be useful for change? What actions would occur if monitoring reveals things are not going as planned? 2) What should be measured?; 3) Should an impact evaluation be conducted?; 4) How should the impact evaluation be done?
  26. 26. STEP 8 – MAKE POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS OR DECISIONS 1) If applicable, has the public been engaged in the policymaking process? 2) Is a policy brief being developed to collate all of the analyses captured in the workbook? 3) Is a policy dialogue being planned to support evidence-informed policymaking
  27. 27. EVALUATION OF THE WORKBOOK • The process of using the workbook was studied in Peru and Uganda • Overall, the findings reflect 3 changes in the process of developing evidence briefs: 1) A workbook, which was specific to contextualizing the OptimizeMNH guidance, was provided. 2) Two authors from Canada provided support throughout the process. 3) Each relevant recommendation from the OptimizeMNH guidance was worked through systematically for developing policy options for the evidence briefs, which according to country experts, is not how guidelines are typically used, and are instead used more generally as a reference.
  28. 28. + Participants in both countries plan on using or are already using the workbook for other, unrelated, work. + The workbook, which was specific for contextualizing the OptimizeMNH guidance, made the process faster and easier when compared with prior processes. + The workbook was systematic, logical, and user-friendly. It served as a tool for developing evidence briefs but also as a checklist for evaluating the work. There was a concern raised, however, that because it is so systematic, it could also limit peoples’ thinking about the problem or how to address it. + Examples in the workbook were seen as helpful, however, there was disagreement over whether there was a need for more examples to help those in areas with limited data or those who were not trained in health policy and systems. + Country experts were helpful for both content and methods (i.e., evidence briefs). + Outside support was helpful for building capacity and focusing attention on the work. + The process of using the workbook helped find gaps in knowledge and in practice. + The process of using the workbook helped evaluate the OptimizeMNH guidance and standardize thinking globally. Even though some of the comments made by participants reflected a sense of what the guidance and the workbook should be able to do, it is important to address the expectations of this work, as neither the guidance nor the workbook could address the specific contexts of each country or region (although consideration could be given to having WHO regional offices and country offices support the development of regional or national guidance) nor direct how the country should or could make necessary changes (e.g., ensure a law is passed to support the changes) nor replace the tacit knowledge of people at the country level. ADVANTAGES OF USING THE WORKBOOK
  29. 29. CHALLENGES OF USING THE WORKBOOK - The workbook was too long and complex. In general, everyone reviewing the workbook stated that it is too dense or tedious because of the amount of sections and questions asked in the workbook. However, when asked which sections could be left out to make it shorter, there were no specific areas mentioned. - The workbook had areas of redundancy and overlap - The workbook had missing components: glossary of medical terms, advocacy Also, although costs are addressed in the workbook they may need to come out more explicitly in the evidence brief since policymakers are very interested in cost. - The language used in the workbook could be difficult for those without training in health policy and systems to understand. Also, English terms could be difficult for some to understand. This was not the case for those involved in these processes in Peru and Uganda because they had the appropriate training, but they felt others may have difficulty with the language. On the other hand, several interviewees felt the workbook was easy to understand and that the terms were described well.
  30. 30. NEXT STEPS Revise the workbook based on findings from evaluating the process of using the workbook in Peru and Uganda and from a critical interpretive synthesis of the literature to better define contextualization and contextual factors affecting policy development and implementation
  31. 31. REFERENCES • Bosch-Capblanch X, Lavis JN, Lewin S, Atun R, Røttingen J-A, Dröschel D, et al. Guidance for Evidence-Informed Policies about Health Systems: Rationale for and Challenges of Guidance Development. PLoS Med. 2012 2012/03/06;9(3). • Lavis JN, Røttingen J-A, Bosch-Capblanch X, Atun R, El-Jardali F, Gilson L, et al. Guidance for Evidence-Informed Policies about Health Systems: Linking Guidance Development to Policy Development. PLoS Med. 2012 2012/03/13;9(3). • Mitton C, Adair C, McKenzie E, Patten S and Wayperry, B. Knowledge Transfer and Exchange: Review and Synthesis of the Literature. Milbank Quarterly 2007, 85(4): 729-768.
  32. 32. THANK YOU!! Questions??
  33. 33. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo • Use Q&A to post comments and/or questions • ‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Q&A Participant Side Panel in WebExYour Comments/Questions 35
  34. 34. Your Feedback is Important Please take a few minutes to share your thoughts on today’s webinar. Your comments and suggestions help to improve the resources we offer and plan future webinars. The short survey is available at: https://nccmt.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bxTi 9jbBoSaomLb 36
  35. 35. Poll Question #5 What are your next steps? I plan to … A. access the Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook. B. read the NCCMT summary of the Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook. C. consider using the Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook. D. tell a colleague about the Contextualizing Guidelines Workbook. 37
  36. 36. Join us for our next webinar A Tool for Sharing Best Practices March 30th from 1:00 – 2:30pm EST The INFO Project with the United States Agency for International Development, has developed a method for sharing best practices within organizations. Join us to learn more about how this method could be applicable to your organization. Register at: https://health-evidence.webex.com 38
  37. 37. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada | Affiliated with McMaster University The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada. For more information about the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools: NCCMT website www.nccmt.ca Contact: nccmt@mcmaster.ca

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