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"So You Have a Big Idea?"

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AZLA 2015 learning studio presentation

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"So You Have a Big Idea?"

  1. 1. SO YOU HAVE A BIG IDEA?
  2. 2. FACULTY & THE LEARNING STUDIO -WITH MARK MANONE
  3. 3. THE EVOLUTION OF THE BIG IDEA
  4. 4. i have BIGdreams
  5. 5. “BUILD FOR THE POTENTIAL IN THE TECHNOLOGY.” Astrid Klocke Associate Professor, Comparative Cultural Studies President, NAU Faculty Senate Faculty Partner, Cline Library Learning Studio
  6. 6. SCALE-UP CLASSROOM http://scaleup.ncsu.edu/index
  7. 7. PHOENIX BIOMEDICAL CAMPUS
  8. 8. BUILDING THE SPACE Moving the Big Idea from Your Mind to Reality
  9. 9. WHAT SPACES MEAN TO US “Buildings learn from their occupants and they learn from it.” Stewart Brand “Whether people are fully conscious of this or not, people actually derive countenance and sustenance from the atmosphere and things they live in and with.” Frank Lloyd Wright
  10. 10. PROJECT MANAGEMENT • Know Your Building • Layouts, layouts and more layouts • How Many People Does it Take to Build Your Project? – Contractors/Sub-contractors • Timelines – Sticking to the timeline: wait is that even possible? • Project Managers • Documentation • How to Pick a Chair? • Humor and Perseverance • A Great Team
  11. 11. KNOW YOUR BUILDING HVAC Security Fire, Life, Safety Floor Load/PSF History Lighting
  12. 12. LAYOUTS
  13. 13. LAYOUTS AND DESIGNERS
  14. 14. LOTS OF REVISIONS • Confirm every measurement. • Review every finish specification. • Look at all the outlet placements. • Expect to miss something.
  15. 15. HOW MANY PEOPLE DOES IT TAKE… • The short answer is…a lot. • 2-30 people from each company.
  16. 16. TIMELINES (ALWAYS LIE)
  17. 17. GANTT CHARTS CAN BE YOUR FRIEND (BUT THEY LIE TOO) • Gantter by Google
  18. 18. PROJECT MANAGERS • How many people are in charge? 1. NAU Facility Services Project Manager (NAU-PM) • Contracts, funds allocation, NAU’s compliance • Works closely with CLPM • Helps review/official sign-off on all plans 2. Cline Library Project Manager (CLPM) • Leads library project team • Ensure “Big Idea actually happens as envisioned” • Works closely with NAU-PM 3. General Contractor Project Manager • Oversees construction • Hires and manages subcontractors • Dry-wall, paint, electricians, Fire-Life-Safety, etc… • Technology Subcontractor
  19. 19. DOCUMENTATION 1 BILLION AND 1 DETAILS Track it all. Don’t expect that others are doing this for you. You’ll want to know all those details later and you won’t remember yesterday, tomorrow. Meeting notes and action items. OneNote.
  20. 20. HOW TO PICK A CHAIR?
  21. 21. HUMOR AND PERSEVERANCE
  22. 22. GETTING TO DONE = A GREAT TEAM Video removed due to size requirements
  23. 23. QUESTIONS?
  24. 24. BREAK
  25. 25. LEARNING STUDIO TECHNOLOGY Bringing behind the scenes technology to the front of the classroom
  26. 26. DESIGN • Minimalist Design – Multiple Configurations to suit virtually any teaching method – Frontless design to engage every student – Writeable Surfaces – Behind the scenes technology, so the focus is on the lesson • Simple, Unobtrusive Technology – Minimalist design carried through into technology – Simplified connectivity for everyone – Students can connect the devices they already have – Self-Healing technology • Supporting a New Pedagogy – Facilitates collaboration in real-world scenarios with industry-standard software to provide students the experience as well as the education – Move between lab and lecture seamlessly
  27. 27. ROOM TECHNOLOGY • 85” UltraHD 4k monitor • 2 120” digital HD projectors • HD Videoconferencing (via Microsoft Lync) • iPad for room control • UHD DVD player • Ceiling mounted HD document camera • Hands free headset for instructor • 70 Dell laptops available for student use • 70 sets of headphones • iClicker polling system with 70 remotes
  28. 28. WORKSTATION TECHNOLOGY • 10 Completely independent workstations – 55” Monitor – Discrete speaker and headphone system – Windows 7 virtual desktop – 6 HDMI inputs – Touch panel controls – Table microphones for voice amplification and videoconferencing – Color-coded sources
  29. 29. ROOM CONTROL Activity-based controls so you tell the room what you want to do, instead of how to do it. Scaled user interface to provide exactly the level of control that you need Help is at the touch of a button, or just outside the door
  30. 30. USE Classes in the Learning Studio this semester include the following: • Statistics • Geography • Economics • Cinema • Business • Philosophy • Biology
  31. 31. QUESTIONS
  32. 32. MANAGING THE LEARNING STUDIO Scheduling, day-to-day management, tech support, security, and more
  33. 33. SCHEDULING • Minimum requirements – Enrollment - 50-70 students – Intended use of room – not just lecture • Exceptions made after classes meeting above requirements are scheduled – Demonstrated need for features of the room – Often used for supplemental instruction • One-time events – Should meet minimum requirements above—especially the second one – Have used for continuing education, strategic planning meetings, and more
  34. 34. BEFORE THE SEMESTER STARTS • Identify faculty needs – usually software • Maintenance and upgrades
  35. 35. DAY-TO-DAY MANAGEMENT • Setup – 20 minutes before class/event – Technology Services staff member or student meets instructor in room and ensures that everything is in good working order, answers instructor questions • Reset – 20 minutes after class/event – Technology maintenance – Cleaning
  36. 36. ROOM RESET SURVEY • Survey conducted during reset period after each class/event by Technology Services staff/student • Questions – Technology used – Room features used – What worked – What didn’t work – Anything else they’d like us to know • Responses reviewed every 1-2 weeks to identify problems not otherwise reported and patterns of problems • Responses analyzed each semester and reported in semi-annual assessment report to Provost • Key element of assessment program • Also demonstrates support and concern for faculty and student experience
  37. 37. TECHNICAL SUPPORT • Goal from beginning: problem fixed within 2 minutes of report • Instructor can call or send someone for help • Tech Desk – launched fall 2015 – Line of sight to Learning Studio – helps with room security – Easier for faculty to request assistance – Students provide most frontline support
  38. 38. ROOM SECURITY • Card access only • Card access programmed by class time • Line of sight from Tech Desk
  39. 39. PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE • Increase redundancy so equipment failures aren’t catastrophic • Use assessment tools to identify additional faculty needs – and find ways to meet them • Possibly – make room available for student study late evenings • Incorporate emerging technologies to keep the room on the cutting edge
  40. 40. QUESTIONS?
  41. 41. ASSESSMENT IN THE CLINE LIBRARY LEARNING STUDIO In Fall 2014, at the request of NAU’s provost, we launched a year-long assessment project to better understand the experience of students and faculty in the room. NAUMARKETING
  42. 42. ASSESSMENT PROJECT We collaborated with faculty teaching in the Learning Studio, library staff, a research analyst and many others on this project, which incorporated both quantitative and qualitative measures. Key Project Personnel • Suzanne Pieper, Assessment Coordinator, Office of Curriculum, Learning Design, and Academic Assessment • Laura Rose Taylor, Assistant Dean, Cline Library • Toshio Asai, Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology, NAU College of Education JESSVOGELSANG
  43. 43. CRITICAL INCIDENT QUESTIONNAIRE (CIQ) A five-question survey encouraged students to reflect on their learning and gave instructors information regarding how students were experiencing their teaching. Survey Item: At what moment in class this week did you feel most engaged with what was happening? “I felt most engaged when we were watching each other present our projects and presenting ourselves. It was a fun way to see the people in the class understanding the material.”
  44. 44. CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS Comments and a ranking were recorded on a rubric for various interactions such as student engagement in instruction and instructor engagement with technology. Rubric Criterion: Instructor Engagement with Students Highest-Ranking Interaction: Instructor Engagement with Students • Most of the instructors maintained good eye contact with their students, walked around the room to facilitate questions, and visited work stations to better facilitate student learning. • Instructor engagement with students increased as instructors became more familiar with the layout of the room and its instructional and technological capabilities.
  45. 45. STUDENT AND FACULTY END-OF-TERM SURVEYS The surveys assessed four psychometrically tested constructs: engagement, enrichment, flexibility, and classroom/course fit. They were adapted from a 2009 survey of student perceptions of classroom space developed by the Research and Evaluation Team at the Center for Educational Innovation at University of Minnesota. Rated High by Students and Faculty: Enhances in-class activities with features of the room (movable furniture, large-screen displays, etc.) Rated Low by Students and Faculty: Helps me to develop connections with my classmates/students. Survey Item: The classroom in which I am taking this course…
  46. 46. FACULTY POST-TERM INTERVIEWS Faculty were asked four questions about their experience teaching in the Learning Studio. Interview Question: How have you changed as an instructor as a result of your experience in the Learning Studio? Most frequent response: I became more interactive with my students. “I feel as though all of my projects have become more ‘hybridized’ to include more group, discussion, writing, and technical analysis. I have also confirmed my feeling that ‘studio’ time, using class time to work on projects, to get instructor and peer feedback is essential.” – MARK MANONE
  47. 47. CLASSROOM-BASED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES A small study was conducted using student performance data from the signature assignment in five iterations of one instructor’s course. Research Questions • Are there significant differences in students’ total scores on the signature assignment analysis essay among the five different iterations (Fall 2011 Traditional, Fall 2012 Blended, Spring 2013 Blended, Fall 2013 Blended, and Fall 2014 Blended + Learning Studio) of the course? • If so, between which iterations of the course are there significant differences? Fall 2014 students in the Learning Studio performed statistically significantly better than did Fall 2011 students in a traditional type of classroom space. Students in all classes taught in the blended format performed statistically significantly better than did students in the traditional format.
  48. 48. • An online survey used by Library Technology Services (LTS) after a class session collected data about the room’s use and any technical problems. • LTS tracked technical issues through the Room Reset Survey, a help desk ticket system, and frequent conversations with faculty. • As faculty taught in the Learning Studio, they shared additional needs with LTS staff. Tools and Strategies • Most used: Display instructor’s content onto large or all screens Problems Reported • Most common: Audiovisual equipment Room Reset Survey Items ROOM RESET SURVEY, TECHNICAL ISSUES, TECHNOLOGY BARRIERS AND UNMET NEEDS
  49. 49. BASIC QUESTIONS • Who will administer each measure? • How will each measure be administered? • When and how often will each measure be administered? JESSVOGELSANG • Who will collect and analyze the data? • How will the results be shared and with whom? • How will the results be used for continuous improvement?
  50. 50. LESSONS LEARNED • Start early. Anticipate the need to educate others and yourself. • Strengthen your assessment plan by including quantitative and qualitative measures. • Determine all stakeholders early and ensure they understand the project goals. Involve them in the assessment planning and ask for their feedback throughout the project. • Make sure all involved understand the time commitment.
  51. 51. MORE LESSONS LEARNED • Where applicable, partner with campus Institutional Review Board to ensure that participants understand what types of research may need or benefit from IRB approval. • Expect change to impact your assessment project. A lot can happen over the course of your project. • Acknowledge that your findings may have ripple effects beyond the original scope of the project. • Expect to learn a lot and be pushed beyond your comfort zone.
  52. 52. QUESTIONS?
  53. 53. WHAT ABOUT YOUR BIG IDEAS?
  54. 54. TOP TEN LESSONS LEARNED WHEN BUILDING OUR BIG IDEA
  55. 55. #10. EXPECT DEADLINES TO CHANGE. https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/5c/d2/51/5cd251205db8e33bfbb70ed44a6f2500.jpg
  56. 56. #9. DON’T ASSUME ANYTHING. SPELL IT ALL OUT. http://www.weeklysouthernarts.com/uploads/5/7/5/5/5755954/1350919276.jpg
  57. 57. #8. IT TAKES MORE PEOPLE THAN YOU THINK. http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/media/ images/75482000/jpg/_75482267_trapeze.jpg
  58. 58. #7. IT TAKES MORE TIME THAN YOU THINK. http://www.redbubble.com/people/kiwigal/works/3432065-running-out-of-time
  59. 59. #6. IT TAKES WAY MORE MONEY THAN YOU THINK. https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/96/e4/7c/96e47ce26fcdf362efac6aec6bd602fa.jpg
  60. 60. #5. NO MATTER HOW CAREFULLY EVERYTHING IS PLANNED, THE ENVIRONMENT WILL EVOLVE. http://cutecaptions.com/images/that-does-look-comfy/are-you-kidding-me-you-expected-me.jpg
  61. 61. #4. INVESTING IN RELATIONSHIPS IS CRITICAL FROM THE START. http://www.extrapackofpeanuts.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/lego-shake-hands-2.jpg
  62. 62. #3. ONCE YOU’VE SOLD THE IDEA, EXPECT TO KEEP SELLING IT. http://img.scoop.it/r8XTjwm2kHIFkk42put5Szl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVvK0kTmF0xjctABnaLJIm9
  63. 63. #2. ANTICIPATE A GAME-CHANGING SURPRISE. http://www.clker.com/cliparts/f/8/8/e/1391840837323789383shocked-face-hi.png
  64. 64. #1. DON’T BUILD A TRIANGLE ROOM. https://lh3.ggpht.com/-S5sYfxMmCh89QJcL0FMnLoe1__9JQWm1GwYD_AZb3BDKmqxyIzf2M84iiAEMSrnTQ=w300
  65. 65. HOW TO REACH US Cynthia.Childrey@nau.edu Dean and University Librarian, Cline Library Mark.Manone@nau.edu College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Jill.Friedmann@nau.edu Assistant Dean, Cline Library Jeff.Hillock@nau.edu Support Systems Analyst, Sr. Library Technology Services, Cline Library Janet.Crum@nau.edu Head of Library Technology Services Cline Library Laura.Taylor@nau.edu Assistant Dean, Cline Library Thank you.

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