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Come Together: Interdepartmental Collaboration to Connect the IR and Library Catalog

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Presenter: Amanda Makula, University Of San Diego

While institutional repositories (IRs) often include a built-in searching mechanism and/or are indexed by web search engines, what about our patrons who go straight to the library catalog with their information need? Rather than hope that users will stumble upon the IR from the library website or assume that they will start their research with a Google search, librarians can facilitate greater IR discoverability and usage by integrating its content into the library catalog. With strong teamwork, good communication, and a shared vision, this endeavor helps transform the IR and library catalog from separate, siloed platforms into a more cohesive collections package.

At the University of San Diego, librarians and administrators across three departments -- Technical Services, Systems, and Archives / Special Collections / Digital Initiatives --recognized this opportunity and came together to share information and work in concert to explore and enact the benefits of auto-harvesting IR content into the library catalog. Driven by a vision of providing enhanced discoverability and access, as well as promoting the IR as a whole and enriching the catalog, the team members worked cooperatively to identify specific IR collections appropriate for harvest, investigate technical logistics, consult outside vendors (including Innovative and bepress), and experiment with implementation.

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Come Together: Interdepartmental Collaboration to Connect the IR and Library Catalog

  1. 1. Come Together: Interdepartmental Collaboration to Connect the IR and Library Catalog AMANDA MAKULA, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO
  2. 2. Background
  3. 3. “Scholars are often frustrated with isolated databases that require them to repeat their searches . . . The discovery tool is an attempt to answer this criticism by integrating resources with traditional catalog entries to provide a single point for searching . . . [and] can include more than just articles with the addition of locally developed resources that are frequently hidden in repositories and disconnected from the catalog” (1). Using Google Analytics, this study discovered that users: • spend greater time with content they find via harvest than via other referral sources, such as a Web search • are more likely to return to content discovered via harvest than to content discovered in other ways DeeAnn Allison, “OAI-PMH Harvested Collections & User Engagement,” Journal of Web Librarianship10, no. 1 (2016): 1-14, https://doi.org/10.1080/19322909.2015.1128867
  4. 4. “The library catalog enhances access by virtue of being one of any library’s most authoritative and widely available resources. In addition, it is more familiar to many researchers than the institutional repository. The library catalog is also used by researchers worldwide, either directly or through WorldCat, and when the content it has cataloged is made openly available, such as through an institutional repository, those researchers may access it. Finally, harvesting and crosswalking institutional repository metadata . . . also extends the function of the catalog to include non-traditional library materials” (226). Andrew Wesolek, Jan Comfort, and Lisa Bodenheimer, “Collaborate to Innovate: Expanding Access to Faculty Patents through the Institutional Repository and the Library Catalog,” Collection Management 40, no. 4 (2015): 219-235, doi:10.1080/01462679.2015.1093986
  5. 5. Institutional context
  6. 6. University of San Diego The University of San Diego is a Roman Catholic institution committed to advancing academic excellence, expanding liberal and professional knowledge, creating a diverse and inclusive community and preparing leaders who are dedicated to ethical conduct and compassionate service. College for Women (1949) merged with College for Men (1954) in 1972 Approximately 8900 undergraduates, graduate students, and law students; 900 full and part-time faculty members Eight academic divisions
  7. 7. University of San Diego Marks of Distinction: ◦Changemaker Campus ◦Study Abroad Program ◦Sustainable Campus ◦Most Beautiful Campus
  8. 8. Library and ITS Copley Library ◦ Collections, Access, and Discovery ◦ Reference ◦ Archives, Special Collections, and Digital Initiatives ◦ Institutional repository, Digital USD: Digital Commons (bepress) ◦ Prior to IR: ContentPro (DAMS by Innovative / III) Information Technology Services ◦ Head of Library and Web Services and Library System Administrator ◦ Library catalog: Encore & Encore Duet (discovery platform) (Innovative / III) ◦ Integrated library system: Sierra (Innovative / III)
  9. 9. Harvesting project team members: From Copley Library: •Laura Turner, Head of Technical Services •Diane Maher, University Archivist •Amanda Makula, Digital Initiatives Librarian From Information Technology Services (ITS): •Michael O’Brien, Senior Director of Library & Web Services •Bee Bornheimer, Library System Administrator
  10. 10. Implementation
  11. 11. Questionnaire from Innovative • What is the repository base URL? • Is this an image repository? • What is the name of the repository? • What is the estimated number of records that will be harvested? • How frequently is the repository updated? (daily/weekly/monthly) • Please provide at least one staff email address to receive notifications.
  12. 12. Problems / Issues 1. Large amount of metadata from the IR cluttered the catalog record --Solution: greater customization of metadata output by using Simplified Dublin Core (dcs) 2. Customized field titles in IR did not carry over to the catalog record 3. Harvest dumped the contents of multiple fields mapped to the same Dublin Core element into one string in the catalog record 4. Time stamp appearing at the end of the Date field
  13. 13. Problems / Issues (continued) 5. Back sides of postcards appeared as separate records in the catalog with no connection to their corresponding fronts --Solution: bepress can add a field to mark specific records for exclusion from the harvest 6. Harvest mysteriously blocked when IR transitioned to HTTPS --Solution: Roll back the IR to HTTP until Encore can support HTTPS harvesting
  14. 14. Harvested collections appear in the facet menu of the library catalog
  15. 15. Reflection
  16. 16. • Meet in person • E-mail and phone calls • Shared Google Doc • What’s working? What isn’t? • Challenge your vendors • Metadata mappings • Information and questions for vendors • Assemble your team • Items to include? Exclude? Identify Prepare ShareAssess
  17. 17. REFERENCES Kathleen Menzies, Duncan Birrell, and Gordon Dunsire, “An Investigation of Information Systems Interoperability in UK Universities: Findings and Recommendations,” New Review of Information Networking 16, no. 2 (2011): 92-140, doi:10.1080/13614576.2011.619917. DeeAnn Allison, “OAI-PMH Harvested Collections & User Engagement,” Journal of Web Librarianship 10, no. 1 (2016): 1-14, doi:10.1080/19322909.2015.1128867. Andrew Wesolek, Jan Comfort, and Lisa Bodenheimer, “Collaborate to Innovate: Expanding Access to Faculty Patents through the Institutional Repository and the Library Catalog,” Collection Management 40, no. 4 (2015): 219-235, doi:10.1080/01462679.2015.1093986.
  18. 18. “Mission, Vision and Values,” University of San Diego, accessed May 18, 2018, http://www.sandiego.edu/about/mission-vision-values.php. “Rankings and Recognition,” University of San Diego, accessed May 18, 2018, http://www.sandiego.edu/about/rankings-and-recognition.php. “Digital Commons and OAI-PMH: Harvesting Repository Records,” bepress, accessed May 18, 2018, https://www.bepress.com/reference_guide_dc/digital-commons-oai-harvesting.
  19. 19. Thank You!

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