NAHO CONFERENCE
      2009
  OTTAWA, ON
The Treatment of Intergenerational
     Trauma, Resiliency in First Nation
      Peoples and the Experience of
       Resi...
What are the meanings of Post-
    Colonial Trauma and what to do?
 Linking History to the Present
 Linking Present Situ...
   Ever since Residential Schools were officially
    sanctioned by the Government in the late 1850s
    to when they off...
Results:
   Depression
   Anxiety
   Problems with parenting
   Maladaptive coping:

    – Substance Abuse

    – Dome...
Trauma Subtypes
   Cultural trauma is an attack on the fabric of a society, affecting the
    essence of the community an...
Trauma Informed Principles
- “Trauma-informed” services are not specifically designed
  to treat symptoms or syndromes rel...
Trauma Informed Services

 Understand what is meant by trauma
  informed systems of care or practices;
 Gain an understa...
Trauma Informed Principles
   Information:
    – Normalize victim‟s and family‟s reactions to
      severe stress or chao...
Feeling the Impact of Trauma on:

– Feelings and emotions

– Physical and body responses

– Thinking and reasoning functio...
Identity Conflicts
Historical and Cultural effects: Identity as a
  First Nation person not valued
  – Conflict with youth...
Restoring Healing and Promoting
                Balance
 Using Story-telling or Narrative methods to
  instill trust
 Un...
Models of Well-Being and Resiliency

                                Relational




             Emotional               ...
Models of Well-Being and Resiliency
   Traditional methods focus on Balance,
    Harmony, Respect, Connectedness and
    ...
Role of Helper in Trauma Healing
 Guide on the healing pathway
 Impart a sense of confidence in process
  and methods us...
Questions?
   Meegwetch, Nia:wen, Merci, Thank you

   Acknowledgements to DS Bigfoot at the
    University of Oklahoma
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The Treatment of Intergenerational Trauma, Resiliency in First Nation Peoples and the Experience of Residential School Exposure.

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Authors: Dr. Bob Chaudhuri (1), Gerry V Martin, Anishawbae(2), Mary Lou Kelley MSW (3)

Affiliations:
1.Northern Ontario School of Medicine
2.Thunder Bay, Traditional Teacher
3.Lakehead University

NAHO 2009 National Conference

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
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The Treatment of Intergenerational Trauma, Resiliency in First Nation Peoples and the Experience of Residential School Exposure.

  1. 1. NAHO CONFERENCE 2009 OTTAWA, ON
  2. 2. The Treatment of Intergenerational Trauma, Resiliency in First Nation Peoples and the Experience of Residential School Exposure.  Authors: Dr. Bob Chaudhuri (1), Gerry V Martin, Anishawbae(2), Mary Lou Kelley MSW (3)  Affiliations: 1. Northern Ontario School of Medicine 2. Thunder Bay, Traditional Teacher 3. Lakehead University
  3. 3. What are the meanings of Post- Colonial Trauma and what to do?  Linking History to the Present  Linking Present Situations to the Future  Not being afraid to face: – Fear – Shame – Guilt  Being vulnerable and a victim  Turning a victim of the past to a victor in the future  Recognizing root causes, i.e. Residential Schools
  4. 4.  Ever since Residential Schools were officially sanctioned by the Government in the late 1850s to when they officially closed in the lte 1970s [though some would say it was the finished in late 1980s in the Arctic]: – children were taken from parents – many were abused emotionally, physically or sexually – arguably all were spiritually damaged – they‟re skills with relationships were compromised
  5. 5. Results:  Depression  Anxiety  Problems with parenting  Maladaptive coping: – Substance Abuse – Domestic Violence – Suicide – Loss of Traditions/Values/Language – Accidents – Incarceration
  6. 6. Trauma Subtypes  Cultural trauma is an attack on the fabric of a society, affecting the essence of the community and its members  Historical trauma is the cumulative exposure of traumatic events that affect an individual and continues to affect subsequent generations  Intergenerational trauma occurs when trauma is not resolved, subsequently internalized, and passed from one generation to the next  Present trauma is what vulnerability Today‟s youth are experiencing on a daily basis
  7. 7. Trauma Informed Principles - “Trauma-informed” services are not specifically designed to treat symptoms or syndromes related to sexual or physical abuse or other trauma, but they are informed about, and sensitive to, trauma-related issues present in survivors. - A “trauma-informed” system is one in which all components of a given service system have been reconsidered and evaluated in the light of a basic understanding of the role that violence plays in the lives of people seeking mental health and addictions services (Harris & Fallot, 2001)
  8. 8. Trauma Informed Services  Understand what is meant by trauma informed systems of care or practices;  Gain an understanding of cultural practices that can direct treatment considerations and;  Incorporate reconciliation / reunification process (Balance and Harmony Concepts)
  9. 9. Trauma Informed Principles  Information: – Normalize victim‟s and family‟s reactions to severe stress or chaos created by the event(s) – Provide information about emotional and physical/behavioral reactions to stressful or dangerous events – Instill hope for victim and family recovery – Educate family about the benefits and need for talking or addressing event in a helpful manner
  10. 10. Feeling the Impact of Trauma on: – Feelings and emotions – Physical and body responses – Thinking and reasoning function – Access to family contact and prior level of family support – Degree of safety and trust – Expectations about legal/child welfare system – Questions about self-worth and where client has attachment and sense of belonging
  11. 11. Identity Conflicts Historical and Cultural effects: Identity as a First Nation person not valued – Conflict with youth culture (gang, assimilation, dominate society) – Difficult for Native youth in urban schools to develop a sense of pride in their heritage – Content with stereotypes of their people and what those stereotypes reflect of themselves – the mirror not the role model – Biculturalism poses a particular problem (mixed races or mixed tribes)
  12. 12. Restoring Healing and Promoting Balance  Using Story-telling or Narrative methods to instill trust  Uncover Contextual ways of explaining the world  Uncover Contextual ways of explaining how and why good and bad things happen  Pathways for the Healing Process
  13. 13. Models of Well-Being and Resiliency  Relational Emotional Communal Spiritual Physical Mental
  14. 14. Models of Well-Being and Resiliency  Traditional methods focus on Balance, Harmony, Respect, Connectedness and Wellness  The Healer to be a useful guide to “Healing the Soul Wound” (Duran, 2008) must be mindful that Trust is Key
  15. 15. Role of Helper in Trauma Healing  Guide on the healing pathway  Impart a sense of confidence in process and methods used  Call upon helpers and healers to aid with child and family  Use the family‟s wisdom to assist with the healing process  Affirm the child and family „s sense of well-being and balance
  16. 16. Questions?  Meegwetch, Nia:wen, Merci, Thank you  Acknowledgements to DS Bigfoot at the University of Oklahoma

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