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Fact of the Day: Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

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Honor Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month by gaining a daily dose of knowledge. Share the knowledge and help raise awareness everyday.

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Fact of the Day: Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

  1. 1. OVARIAN CANCER AWARENESS
  2. 2. MYRIAD GENETICS PRESENTS OVARIAN CANCER AWARENESS SEPTEMBER DAILY AWARENESS SUN MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3
  3. 3. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 1 1 in 72 women will develop ovarian cancer in their lifetime.1
  4. 4. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 2 1 in 7 ovarian cancers are due to BRCA mutations.2
  5. 5. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 3 Lynparza (olaparib) is the first and only FDA-approved PARP inhibitor for use in patients with ovarian cancer who have a BRCA mutation and have been treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy.3 Hear about one patient’s journey with BRCA-associated ovarian cancer: Katya
  6. 6. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 4 Pap tests/cervical smear tests are not a screening test for ovarian cancer.4
  7. 7. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 5 Almost half (44%) of women with BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer have NO family history of breast or ovarian cancer.2 44%
  8. 8. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 6 Up to 5% of endometrial cancers are due to a hereditary (inherited) cause. The most common hereditary cause of endometrial cancer is Lynch syndrome, which also increases the risk of developing colorectal and ovarian cancer.5
  9. 9. t w eet th is t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 7 There are other genes that increase the risk of ovarian cancer beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2, such as BRIP1, MSH6, and RAD51D. Learn more about these and other hereditary ovarian cancer genes here. OVARIAN BRCA1 BRIPI MSH2 MSH6 PMS2RAD51D RAD51C EPCAM TP53 BRCA2 MLH1 STK11
  10. 10. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 8 0 20 40 60 80 100 Women with a BRCA mutation have up to a 44% risk of developing ovarian cancer by age 70 (compared to the average woman’s risk of 1.4%.)6 Breast cancer by age 50 Breast cancer by age 70 Ovarian cancer by age 70
  11. 11. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 9 Symptoms of endometrial cancer can include vaginal bleeding, spotting, or discharge that is not normal for you. Any vaginal bleeding occurring after menopause should be further evaluated to rule out endometrial cancer.7
  12. 12. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 10 People who have a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or child) with a BRCA mutation have a 50% chance to inherit the same mutation.5
  13. 13. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 11 There is no proven early detection test for ovarian cancer. Women at increased risk of developing this cancer, such as those with an inherited gene mutation, may be recommended by their doctor to undergoing screening for certain markers in the blood (such as CA-125) or by ultrasound.8
  14. 14. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 12 The average woman’s risk of developing endometrial cancer is 2.7%. That risk increases to up to 71% in women with a hereditary endometrial cancer syndrome like Lynch syndrome.9 2.7% 71% with hereditary endometrial cancer syndrome the average woman’s risk
  15. 15. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 13 While ovarian cancer is often called the “silent killer”, there are some symptoms to watch out for. These can include bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, difficulty eating or feeling full quickly, urinary symptoms such as urgency or frequency, fatigue, indigestion, back pain, pain with intercourse, constipation, and menstrual changes. If these symptoms persist for more than two weeks, see your physician.4 FATIGUE UPSET STOMACH BACK PAIN CONSTIPATION MENSTRUAL CHANGES ABDOMINAL SWELLING WITH WEIGHT LOSS RECOGNIZE THE SYMPTOMS
  16. 16. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 14 There are preventive measures available for women at increased risk of ovarian cancer. Oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer by up to 50%, and surgical removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes reduces risk by up to 96%. Tubal removal alone and breastfeeding may also reduce the risk of developing ovarian cancer.4 50% oral contraceptives reduce the risk by up to
  17. 17. t w eet th is t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 15 Risk factors for ovarian cancer include: a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, a mutation in a hereditary cancer gene, a personal history of breast cancer, a personal history of colon cancer, having no children, possibly infertility, beginning menstruation at an early age (before age 12), a later age of menopause (after age 55), and increasing age.4
  18. 18. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 16 The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) recommend that ALL women with ovarian cancer receive genetic testing, regardless of family history.10
  19. 19. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 17 There are 3 major types of ovarian cancer: epithelial, germ cell, and sex-cord stromal cell. Epithelial ovarian cancer represents around 90% of ovarian cancers.4 EPITHELIAL Represents around 90% of ovarian cancers; common among women over the age of 60 but can develop at any age. GERM CELL Represents 5% of ovarian cancers; usually only impacts 1 ovary in adolescent and young women. SEX-CORD STROMAL CELL Represents less than 5% of patients; tumors occur with equal frequency among pre- and post-menopausal women.
  20. 20. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 18 Hereditary cancer genetic testing is broadly covered by the vast majority of health insurance plans. In fact, most patients with ovarian cancer pay $0 out of pocket for genetic testing.11 $0 pay for genetic testing
  21. 21. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 19 BRCA mutations can be inherited from either the mother’s or the father’s side of the family.5
  22. 22. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 20 Risk factors for endometrial cancer include: a family history of endometrial cancer, a mutation in a hereditary cancer gene, increased age, beginning menstruation at an early age (before age 12), a late age of menopause (after age 55), exposure to estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy, obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and exposure to tamoxifen.9
  23. 23. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 21 Early detection of ovarian cancer is key, and more research is needed to develop effective screening tools. When caught in its early stages, 92% of women with ovarian cancer will survive five years, compared to only 28% of those who are diagnosed after the cancer has spread to other organs. Unfortunately, only 15% of ovarian cancer is currently diagnosed at an early stage.4 92% of women with ovarian cancer will survive 5 years
  24. 24. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 22 Patients with BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer may respond better to platinum-based chemotherapy, as well as other classes of drugs; for example, PARP inhibitors.2
  25. 25. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 23 A family history of ovarian cancer is important for men to know about as well. Not only could a hereditary ovarian cancer syndrome impact their female relatives, men with a BRCA mutation are also at increased for cancers of the prostate, pancreas, breast, and melanoma.
  26. 26. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 24 Only 25% of patients newly diagnosed with ovarian cancer know their BRCA status12 , even though the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has recommended BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for all patients with epithelial ovarian cancer since 2008. If you’ve had ovarian cancer, talk to your doctor about whether genetic testing is right for you. Only 25% of patients newly diagnosed with ovarian cancer know their BRCA status
  27. 27. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 25 Women with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing a second cancer such as colon cancer or ovarian cancer. Up to 30% will develop a second cancer within 10 years of their first cancer diagnosis, and up to 50% will within 15 years.13,14 30% will develop a second cancer within 10 years 50% will develop a second cancer within 15 years
  28. 28. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 26 Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease. This year, there will be more than 21,000 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed and about 14,000 deaths from ovarian cancer.1 More than 21,000 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed About 14,000 deaths each year from ovarian cancer
  29. 29. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 27 BRCA mutations are not only found in younger patients; 66% of women with BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer are diagnosed after the age of 50.15 66% of BRCA-positive women are diagnosed after age 50
  30. 30. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 28 1 in 4 patients with endometrial cancer are at risk for hereditary cancer and should undergo genetic testing. Approximately 24% of patients with endometrial cancer are diagnosed before the age of 50, which is one of the clinical testing criteria recognized by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN).9,16 at risk for hereditary cancer 24% with endometrial cancer are diagnosed before the age of 50
  31. 31. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 29 Are you at risk for hereditary gynecologic cancer? Take the hereditary cancer quiz here to find out. Red flags for hereditary cancer include rare cancers (such as ovarian cancer), cancer that occurs at an earlier age than in the general population (such as breast or colon cancer in a 30-year-old), more than one type of cancer occurring in one person (such as a woman experiencing both breast and ovarian cancers or cancer in both breasts), and multiple people on the same side of the family with similar or related types of cancer (for example, several relatives with breast cancer).
  32. 32. t w eet th is SEPTEMBER 30 Knowledge is power - talk to your doctor about your personal or family history of ovarian cancer. Find a health care professional here. View full interactive calendar here.

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